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NEW GUIDE 



TO THE 



ENGLISH TONGUE ; 

IN FIVE PARTS ; 



CONTAINING 



jI. vvords/both commomand pro- 
per, from one to six syllables ; 
the several sorts of monosyllables 
in the common words bein? dis- 
tinguished by tables, into words 
Oi two, three, and four lett«rs,&c. 

•with six short lesrans at the end 

x>f each table, not exceeding the 
order ofjyllable* in the forminff! 

rtables. The several sorts of poll 

^ysyllables also being ranged in' 
proper tables, have their sylla-l 

'bles divided, and directions placed 

at the head of each table for thei 

accent, co prevent false pronunJ 

nation ; together with the like! 
viiumber of lessons on the forego-* 

mg tables, placed at the end ofl 

each table, as far ^s to words of 

four syllables, for the easier and ""^ 

fnore speedy way of teaching] V. Forms of Pratees for Chil- 
PK li*? toTead. I dren, on several Occasions. 

lAo whole being recommended by several C!K>ro«»..» a 

Schoolmaiters, as the most useful Lrform»nrVl^^'"r"*** eminent 

Youth, is designed ^br tL\jTSfcu^l\^ 'i* Instruction of 

l^. and in tlfe several ^^n^Il ^^'ZlZS^^Ll^l^;^ ^'^^ 



II. A large and useful table of wordf 
that are the same in sound, but 
different in signification; very 
necessary to prevent the writing 
of one word for anotbei- of th« 
same sound. 

III. A short, but comprehensive 
Grammar of the English Tongue, 
dehvered in the most familiar a«4 
instructive method of questioa 
and answer ; nc risary for all 
suth persons as h^ve the advan. 
tageonly of an English educa. 
tion. 

IV. A useful collection of sentences 
\ pnwe and verse, divine, mor- 
al, and historical ; together with 
a select number of faWei : 

AND 



BY THOMAS DILWORTJjJ> ^ , '" .^ 

A.n.T.„r. &c. ail ^Cl^i^Sito 3Z^"--»?'«»^^ 



REPRmTEO FROM THE LATEST LoN 



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MONTREAL : 
PaiNTED Bv NAHUM MOWER i 
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To the Reverend and WoHhy Promoters of the mmut 
CharUy-Schook tn Great- Britain and Ireland, 



#|1HE tender regard which you havt) always shewed, and 
A stai continue, for the salvation of souls, is eminent- 
If discovered in your care for the education of children. 

To you it 18^ that the poorer sort of people owe their obe- 
dlence, and indeed -these kingdoms their thankfulness, for 
your endeavouring td rescu« so oiany poor creatures from tho 
slavery of Sin and Sataiu/' 

Thus, Gentlemen, it is^our happiness, that you are at 
Ae same time prortioting the glory of GOD, by your careful 
undertaking to save these little ones from utter destT^ction. 

Your preference of the Protestant Reli^on is herein glori- 
«i8ly discovered by those principles of. that best constituted 
diurch, as prof^sed in the Church of England, which you 
ciMise to beuught, and ingrafted in the tender age of your 



Therefore, go on, worthy Sirs, with your wanted zeal for 
^e glory of God, and the p^blic good of these naUons, unit- 
ed in the true faitf, of Christ ; and that your pious endeavours 
may always obtain their desired success, and yom^selves that 
rtward which is promised to those who convert a sinner from 
the evil of his way, is the earnest and hearty prayer of, 

Gentlemen, 

Your most obedient, 

and humble servant, 

Wtfptng School, June Uth^ I740t 




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PREFACE. 





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rS air^aiowg gradu4^^1y ascencU from the fim knowledie 
i «9d u«of Uum, ayUabW., wd wot*,, wh«b^ 

S -^^Pf^^T !^ %>»* » twenty.»x. VeV arena- 

nS^-- ^"^ '**^',,«*eive* it, pertVct «,":." k^o" 
3^4^,^,^^ !^' ^^ " '^'-^"ipl^ »f the «S 

P'?»?„n's,.thoo«te kDbwH W another but -fCt^J^SI u"' 
•nay 'Ssowri^ at.<Ketiio*ldS?5^4'etm tfhi„n„??^^ 

™re a» tfie usfc of Jett^g, (wflri,!^, and ,rorj. i. of .„ ^I 

*?.?»eF,, that we have acqiured.a true knowledeethererf h. 
gfimg e,(^ l^ter ite propW jdice. eachTS^t^S^!^ 

«u^^^h.^h. no one ^m pmend to write or tead atelKgib^ 



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THE F^YACK. 



hav'll/^L'rht^ -any who-^ 

«ate in spoiling, that S^r*' 1'^^::^^ ^^^^ 
guess at die meaning, couclifcd^nX Tl-K ^^*"' "^^ 
jumble of letters put iW wofdT ^laL ^« * P'^P^'^l''**"'' 
taught the irenerifbrcHn/^ **^*^*"5^> ^""^^g never been 

See 't^m'^JjU?''^"^ «»ap.e affordsl: ~ 
praciice. As monosyllables not only make thfe ereateiit nAr* 

Of our tongue, but are the substantil parts of ^TTnrJ^ 

be twe, that otter perfornmnc^ otSSS^'bl^^Sd 
*1 to proceed 8tep by ,tcp ; yet it is atae^, A^C^J"^ 
themWe provided those gr«*^ p«ces for thei^ 2hS t1^ 

1^.7' ^D^ ""™ ^ *« perfection of speJUng. 

In the several Praxes, or lessons of mouosvlSilp. hiri,i>.*^ 
pubhshed in our Mother TongJS. inS'K^neSb? 
.tep, chUdren are taught to ju4 brfore they c^w 2Jt{t 

tunes tremmonjMyllables of two to orters of seven or ^ht 
tetters, before they are informed of those coS betw^ 
#«y mast be thumped and lugged forward, With JSf beW .^i 
mstructed m the right knowledge of the mcT^Z^S md 
u«fu parts of our tongue. Ce*u.Jy this is a* b^uriS 
hterature. M .t woald be cruel in behaviour" to WdTehili 
teke care how .t comes up stams amfthe* tabStitb^wi 
It cannot stride up seven or eight steps at once. 

It It be reasonable, in the order of 'word> tn l»»^ -i^. 
Aose of one syllable, .sail qKsUhJg «,SSS' arree^t Z« 
be «h» wanted m reasonaSe, «at morosvPtaM™ JhwJ 
^st £ario« ,»^titie, ofle;.^^ sh^^KSt^S^ 

S^o^"td-^r'^l"^"S"^f "» ^'^ <* «''"^*~ 
STS^ SiS 'wl?"- '***'^' «» » esemplified in 
t» Ritewag t«,J«.. Besides, wperieace, which mint Jw 



■ *fl<«»ed to be the bMH«^.„ ... 

I rfth^ method. Sefol fr"*?" *«'««•■» the ft»Hir. 
I only_ ,«i tetter, f^'^dj^' f "*' cpUected woX^ 

■ each wMb' og ^roji^ , 'Jr,^? *<« eiwj Je^^n. between 

I over at one ^«d,W Uuiiit wl.. ' J"**™ ***«« «» thrice 
I don the change^J*^;^' l^SPt* »*« -'^'•"1 'eacher ^l p*^.. 

I ««««f the«choIan ft^I W !:^.*^.:;'*»'*««. ferdS 

■ "'epUceofoneof-morii^iffi^i "'"^'^'^'W ei^.wotdZ 

I wd all SIR* wor<l% iivS^nBtt fffff t"^ " taken w«-. 
I woi-ds m our amnuffe ■ A^n^ .*'*'' '^i* the eiiaksi! 

lections pub&hed before, T mlt^ «>>«• any of thoie 7oU 
I been equally ag much cmc^T^ ^"^ t'»t»y careha. 



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TfttpMACE/ 



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saWrtlrtg or dividing syBoble* in Iqibg woi^dp, both •cicordio^, to' 
^ thfeir iOU«d,*and to the rulei of gfatnrniMr/' As4 tJ^sketor^m 
Che peruBid' of this caakcy iowMda'tpiiiMgi jm w^ fiiid, ^t 
whonever * word occurs Ihkt inAj'-'be diVlddl^ <H?t wiy by 
sound, and another bV innnimar, the 8ch<^«r if ito^tefliow 
to^ understand thii doubtful divi^jidn by th» maijk ( '') ov^r Uie 

•"^ aright 8id€ of the VowtA, which; V^cQ]^dJi^gtQ'the»ound«l wg^t 
to'be joined with' the^foHxjwrtig confeoftanf; w^ich ia neve|thc- 
je«8 contrary tothe rules of gmmmar;- and thcte^orie divided 
in<»uch a matiiier as you find printed. "* .. „ 

As tQ the lessons proper to tfach table of wpr^ of many 
V syllabled, th« sanji: care has been corititiued/ hot tondnut any 
wdrd-tobe rieUd itr the same, btrt such only as idiin bdo^g to 
fiOime of the fd^gfoifc|j tables.^ An^ I hope it will b^ esteemed , 
a perfection, that i have omitted ill s'ujerauous Hebrew and 
•bfeolete'ftahle«,^^antf^dt de^qdd theleawSer fr<5m Uie 'attaiu- 
nifrnt of more^^8efufW^rd)?y;1>^ stopping his progress in search 
oPthose names prdpeif tb^iices^d thM^ri, ,iis others have done 
brfor^i by'fillhig -mahypaget t^ith' suuiriiiun^Vbf persons) 
which are^ hot £dintnonly received^ or U^^tuhong^i which 
too often iiartseirte ^^ ' yooftg b^ginucir, *atfd- jirevc^t Uie de- 
siifed ^ett ofHhe diHgent tfedcfeei*', whii^ pjtacejt is to instruct 
hii scholars in•tlWV^toI8t^kecessiff^y'prfrts 'of Iltifmure, *, 

Here 'I should finiaK^nj^acttourifbf tjt^ ^^^^ part of sj* tllhg, 
1!^ it not'hiy prbvirtc^' to' explode ^hiii^rroheous pretence of 
teachmgoWMren t6 s^ell aitogoth^ byttieedt'/*^^ lb opposition 
tonrhich; I wiJtfeirly ask those teach^, Whether their scholars 
dideirer obtain^ to 'a-ngbt Judgnieiit-bf fcijejlirig, ■ by &at ijoe- 
thbd, titt tbey> were^aft^fvwrd* bcttcfr'lnstructed a:pco]^g tii 
Hruie?>idif thkibfe^rufe,' asif ts Mst;-CertidWy,')ttiat tiSere 
o«*»'De\H> {|^ *ie^od 'of spiling fviflito riil^^; I wilt apyeil 

%toiitay^reaiiers howtiicdisist««t Kik,''^f%^i^kch%mior^ 
Ifaet way;;thp«e thh%s.wliich ttftdrWasrds cart" lieV^jr be attained 
but by the latter 1 Certainly every ohfe wiB jdB i^ith ' me in 
ihfe'paiPticyat, tWt' It iritih greatest iblly in thl^rid'foFeara 
things thafiiMist'atW^-iirdi^ Sc leahicd?W ;6ibthjlfr ^iner. 

- Gonseqi^entiy I.maypresttihetoWirist^uinfetftkfiA'tea^^ 
daildrento'pronouiice their wdrdi dearly ibid disiiti^iiy, witli- 
out ibaevor distorted couuteaarices r which ill habits, il is well 
itrtowiifiretoo frequently cositrdcted under :sUcV bad 6k tJiods 
oNttstrucitioiyai t mye endeavoured to root out : habits whlchi 
it is toatruci^Bl^fiWfat^^cd? persectttefas itiret^'th^rcgirBcrs 



,4 



iftfftj^flfodilferenrwweiwfjifiii for hwina 'seen a«rii«iom. 
;«fel?*;— ^^"SP^'?^**"**?*'***^ word^M 4^we in sound but 

ito|a;onIy. fijr En^wl, SoSooTf, t<y enable Tuch^^, ^d- 
^U n«c ho B,|fher towlrite Uieif MciO^prT^^ ibly, « 

wwwur; »ndl1ioB*5itXftan- 



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e 



iftd accofdiflg to tHe itilee of gmnmar 

tf«rer thfe end proi^sed. , 

As practice, in all arts and sciences, is Che sreiit niMliii 
•finrtfuction be^en master and schblan wfuld adJh« r "* 
JSL ^';hf '" a»«y find that their learneV. compreheTt^ te 
bSJ^RiiJlP*'^K'*' ^"JS''* gi«m at^the same time^^rU S " 
iSL^**^ •uthow, the Spectator, Guardian, TatS^ " ' 
whweby thejr may both amly the rules herein containcS To 
w«rd^ procunng a good styfc, and banish from thfeir^«r«ul 
Grub-street papen,, idle iLiphlets, iTdVw fi^^ 
and unseemly jesto, as se^iily to corrupt^ STffTi 

easy fables, with their SsT^rhSTCnS^^^ S* 

master to exercise his scholiri. bv wiiv^?^«nJ«J^ ^® ?® 

Uorr^*, reading « u«fM K.rS^K Sl^' ; 

L^LJ!^<!H!^i"'^r^**^"P»" Air excellent tord* rfl 

fcLS^if^.v" ^rt ^o?^!""'. which -oblige. „eiT 
pnaster to join )fith'ni» (chohuV'in •nnvav. hnfk -.-—IIj! s 

Jvenin^; tt^rHiig them the^ aHrte^Sk^iS^^ 
icpendance isonGodi « Bir wh^mTL i^^T * 1^* **^^ ^^** 
iaveniirh*i«*.""T 1.^ oywnoTO'we Ifve, and move, and 

"we p,e«n-e for our own use, thro^h^Vou^M^ S.' 
hour memory w,«ld have Win . fe^V^ra^J'Sy ^'i^- 



tkfe' i?*Aeface, 



fricii treaure of Icncftjlfed^e for t1io4^ 0at shall come after 

' '** By the flrts tof readinj/ attd writiiig we cfuii «dt at home «,«« 

**^<J4u^nt oiii^elves Vi^ith What is' done in all the distant ^ard 

^.•* of the world, and find what our fatliers did long agt> iii IW 



.^ . — — — ^.. ^.ings atii tue pas 

"a.^e8 of men at onceu^on" the stage, aiid makes tfee thos, 

"pistf^t iiatidris and ages con^rse together; afa'd grow int 

^^aVqumtitance. And'l|^is Ihij?;' by which God has di8C9v«^^^^^ 

**^hrfi power, and jtasticfe/'his pi^ovidence, mercy, and grace! 

][J;- that *vH' Who liv^^nearth'e ena of time, may lewra the wav^t^ 

*^M,etmxk and everlasting happiness,** "' ^ * ' " ' ' ' ' 



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TO 



THE ENOLISm' 



PART L 



THE AWHA 






English. 

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'a* ett id^ od ud 



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be Ki^;r|d 

ke ft fc 

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Ti) Tllfi ENGLISH T6ngUE. 



13 



bla Lie Ul 

bra bre bri 

cha die chi 

cla cle cli 

era ere cri 

dra dre dri 
dwtt dwe dvvi 
fla Be m 
fra fre fri 
gla gle gli 



TABLE Til. 
bio bill f qua que 



bro bru 
cho chu 
clo clu 
cro cru 

dro dru 
dwo 
flo flu 
iro fru 
glo glu 



sea see 

sha she 

ska ske 

sla sle 

sma sme 
sna sue 
spa spe 
sta ste 
swa swe 



qui quo 
sei SCO 
shi slio 
ski sko 
sli slo 

smi smo 
sni sno 
spi spo 
sti sto 
swi swo 



SCO. 

shic' 

sfcu. 

slu 

smxL 
snu 
spu 
stu 

SW.UL 



gra gre gri gro gru tha the tlii tho thiL 
kna kne km kno 1cmi f r. ..^ . • Y'^ ^"^^ 



kna kne kni kno Icnu 
pha phe phi pho phu 
pla pie pli plo plu 
pra pre pri pro pru 



tra tre tri tro tni 
twa twe twi two 
wha whe whi who 
wra wre wri wro writ 



OF MONOSYLLABLES. 

TABLE i; 

^or,s of T.0 Letters, viz. One Vo.el and one Consonant, 

aM an as at ax ay. If in is it. Of oh on or ox ' 

rDo'to^ ^ ^' "' ^^ ^^- ^^ ^^ i- «o so. Wo: 
CL>o to;. JBy \y njy p^ ^^^ "•. 

TABLE II. 
Wb fob th'^'ft ^'k 'l"'" "•'• fi<"> ^objob. 



,^flF 



t : 



li 



ml 



it ? 

> i ! 



t! . 



14 



A NEW GUIDE 



Bag c;^- fag gag hag nag jag tag. Beg leg. 
Big dig fig gig jig pig wig. Bog dog fog hog 
jog log. Bug dug hug jug Jug mug rug tug. 
Dam hj^m ram. Gem hem. Dim him rim. 

jGum mum rum su^ti. Can san man pan (wan). 
Be^i den fen hen men pen tep. Din fin gin kin pin 
sin tin win. Con (son ton won). Bun fun gun 
UUP ,pun run sun tun. Two. 

Cap gap lap map rap tap. Dip hip lip nip rip 
sip -tip. Fop hop lop piop sop top. Cup sup. Bar 
far jar mar tar (war). Her. Fir sir. For. Has 
(was). His. Bat cat fat hat mat rat. 

Bet get jet let met net set wet yet. Bit fit hit 
nit pit sit wit. Dot got hot jot lot not pot rot sot. 
But cut guf. hut nut put rut tut, Lax wax. Kex 
sex ve;^. Fix six. 

Bo?: fox. The. Who. Cry dry fly fry pry shy 
sly sty thy try why. Act all and apt ark arm ai:t 
ash ask asp ass. Ebb egg ell elm end. lU ink. 
Odd off oft old. 

TABLE III 

Words of Three Letters, viz. One Consonant and two Vowels, 

or a Diphthong. ,' 

l^E A sea tea yea. Bee fee see. Die fie lie. Doe 
foe roe toe. Due rue sue. Caw daw law jawj 
maw paw raw saw. Dew few hew mew new pew 
(sew). Bow low mow row sow tow. 

Cow how mow now sow vow. Coo too woo.| 
Bay day gay hay jay lay may nay pay ray say way. 
(Key) (eye). Boy coy joy toy. Ace age ape are I 
aid aim. Ear eat Ice. Oak oil oar oat one out] 
owl own. Use fuse). You. 



TO THE ENGLrlSir TONGUE. 



15 



Some easy Lessons on the foregoing Tables, consisting of 



No 



Words not exceeding Three Letters. 
LESSON I. 

man may put off the law of God. 
The way of God is no ill way. 
My joy is in God all the day. 
A bad maif^ is a foe to God. 

LESSON II. 

To God I cry all the day. 

Who is God, but our God ? 

All men go out of the way of thy law. 

In God do I put my joy, O let me not ski.; 

LESSON III, 

Pay to God his due. 

Go not in the way of bad men. 

No man can see God, 

Our God is the God of all men. 

LESSON IV, 

Who can say he has no sin? 
The way of man is ill, but not the way of* God, 
My son, go not in the way of bad men. 
No man can do as liod can do, 

LESSON V, 

Let me not go out of thy way, O God. 
O do not see my sin, and let me not go to the pit. 
Try me, O God^ and let me not go out of the 
way of thy law. 

LESSON vr. 

The way of man is no? '^ the way of God. 
The law of God is joy to me. 
^_^j -v.n, .X ^ v/u uu Hi, you cannot go to God, 
1^0 as you are bid j but, if you are bid, do no ill. 



. 



I 



I 
I 



.H 






}0 



A NEW GUIDE 
TABLE IV. 



^yords^ ^^ Four Letters, \\z. A Votvel placed bJtveen ihe hv<r- 
„^ Jb'i-mer Consonants, 

J^i^ICH much stichr "Back jack lack pack sack 
tr ick.. Deck neck peck. Kick lick nick pick sick. 

J 3ock lock mock rock sock. Buck duck luck 

J .nuck tuck. Fact. Uuff'cuff huff muff puff. Haft. 
Left. Gift lift sift. Loft soft. Hifi'h nidi sigh. 
Hekl. (Gikl)mildAvild.. ^ 

Cold ifold hold sold told (gold). Calf half. 
Self. Wolf gulf. Balk talk walk. Milk silk. Folk 
(yolk). Bulk hulk. Call fall gall hall tall wtill. J3ell 
iell sell tell well. Bill fill hill kill mill pill till will. 
Boll poll rqll toll. (Bull fuUpull) dull guU hull- 
iBftlm. calm palm. Alms*- 

Help yelp. Gulp pulp. Halt malt salt. Belt felt 
melt pelt.^ Gilt hilt jik milt wilt Colt jolt polt. 

J Lamb. Limb. Comb (bomb) tomb womb. Dumb. 

L ^ymm Camp damp lamp ramp vamp. Hemp. 

Po mp Bump jump lump pump. Band hand land 

sane, ? (wand). 

B.^nd fend lend mend rend send, tend. Bind 

find! ^J'nd mind rind wind. Bond fond pond. Bang 

gang bang. King ring sing wing. Long song. 

Bimsc, C'lmg, Bank laiik rank. Link pink sink 

wink. jVIonk. Cant pant rant (want), .Bent dent 

lent i\en t sent tent vent went. 

Dint h int lint mint (pint). Plunt runt. Garb; 

Ilcrbvevb. Curb. Card hard yard (ward). Herd. 

Bird gird. ( '"ord lord (ford) (word). Curd. Turf. 

Bark dark li.^rk mark j)ark. Jerk. Fork!(pork) 

(work). Lurk turk. Giil. Cu«} hurl purl, F^Wi^ 



(work) 

liarm (w»iO* Tmn. Firm. 



TO THK ENGLISH TONGUE. 



17 



tveen ihe iivcr 

pack sack 
pick sick, 
kick luck 
>uff. Haft, 
nigh sigh. 

Calf half, 
silk. Folk 
wall. JJell 
ill till will, 
gull hull- 

. Belt felt 
: jolt polt. 
b. Durnb^ . 
>.' Hemp, 
hand land 

id* Bind 
►nd. Bang 
>ng song., 
pink sink 
ient dent 

it. Garb. 
I). Herd, 
rd. Turf. 
rk.,(pork) 
ui. F^m^, 



"Form (worm). Barn yarn (warn). Dern fern 



hern yern. Born corn horn morn (born torn worn) 
Burn turn. Carp harp (warp). Cart dart hart 
part tart (wart). Dirt girt. Fort port sort (wort). 
Jlurt. Cas!i dash gash hash lash mash rash sash 
(wash) Dish fish. (Bush push) gush hush rush 
tusli. Cask mask task. Desk, ilisk. 

Busk dusk husk Inusk. Gasp hasp rasp (wasp). 
Lisp wisp. Lass pass. Less mess. Hiss kiss miss. 
Moss toss. Cast fast last past vast (iiast) (wast). 
Lest jest nest rest vest west yest. Fist list mist. 
Cost lost tost (dost) host most post rost. Dust 
lust must rust. Bath lath path (hath). Pith with 
Both doth loth moth. Next. - 



Som east/ Lessons tn the foregoing Tables, consistincr of JVcnls 
not exceeding Four Letters. " 

TT LESSbN I. ' 

XI OLD in the Lord, and mind his word. 
My son, hold fast the law of the Lord. ^ ' 

of Go r"' "^i"^ n^t thy own way, but the way 

Do not tell a lie, and let not thy hand do hurt. 

LESSON II. 

Let all men mind the will of the Lord 
Let no man hurt you, if you can help'it. 
Do as well as you can ; and do no iU. 
J ne Lord is my rock. ^ 

LESSON III. 

Who is God but the Lord? And who is on 
high but our God ? 

1 will call on the Lord all the day long. 
I o the Lord will I lift up myself. 



O cas 



t me not out with bad men. 
B 2 






a.' 



if 



i -r 



H 



' \ 



la 



A "NEW GUIDE 



LESSON IV. 

Goci.is kind to me, and doth help me. s 

Mark .the man that doth well, and do so too? -, 
Let thy eye be on me, O Lord, my God* 
Help such men as want help^ and do not- sin. - 

LESSON V. 

Hurt no man ; and let no man hurt you. 
Let thy sins put you in mind to mend. . 
Send aid to help me, O Lord, my God, 
Use not thyself to tell a lie. 

LESSON Vk .. 

My son,, walk not in the way of bad men, butj 
walk, in the law of the Lord. ' 

Let not God go out of thy mind for he is thy 
Toek. ' 

The Lord can tell what is be&tfor me : to him 
will I go for help. 

TABLE V." 

Words of Four Letters^ viz. A Fotvel placed betuoeen the ftvjo 
' idtter Consonants. 

XSLAB crab drab scabstab (swab). Crib drib 
glib; Knob. Chub club drub grub snub^ Brad 
clad glad shad. Bred bled fled shed sped. Clod 
plod shod trod. Stud. Brag drag flag shag snag 
stag swag wjag. Grig, swig trig. twig. Clog flog 
frog prog. 

L)rug plug slug snug. Dram sham. Them.^ Brim 
grim skim swim trim whim. From (whom). Crum 
drum scum. Bran clan plan, span than (swan). 
Then when wren. Chin grin shin. skin spin thin 
twin. Shun stun. Chap clap nap slap .snap trap 
wrap (swap). 



TO T1I£ E^Gll^ir^ONGUE. 



19 



Step. Chip clip ship skip slip trip whip. Chop > 
Crop drop prop shop slop stop. Scar star. Blur 
s ur spur. This. Thus. Brat chat gnat flat plat 
that (what). Fret wh^t. Knit slit spit. Blot knot J 
trot plot shot spot. Glut shut slut smut. Flax* • 
Irkix. 



More easy Lessons 07i the foregoing Ta6les, consisting qftr' 

Words not exceeding Four Letters^ . 
rp LESSON I. 

X HE ejr6 of God i» on them that do ill. - 

Go not from me, O God^my God. 

The Lord willhelp them that cry to him. 

My son, if thy. way is bad, see that you mend it: - 

LESSON II, • 

When just men do well, then ill hien fall.'^ 
I will mind my way, that 1 may not sin. 
He that doth go with ill men will fall. 
Do all that is just ) and let no ill will be in thy ' 
[mind.' ''" 

Lt:ssOKiit. 
Shun < them that will hurt you, lest y0u' be hurt t 
Ihy them. 

My son, walk'not with th^em that are bad, lest i 
you be so too ; but walk in. the law of the Lord, . 
land God will help you.^ 

Hold m the Lord, and lend anear to his word/ 

LESSON IV. 

My soni hold fast in the law of the Lord.' 
My son, mind not thy. own will, but the will 
I of God. . 

■''-'^ "-^"j *"A*j«v4 i.iic iav» v/i vjuu, and you will 
do well. 



My son, call on the Lord, ar ' be will help you, 



V 



-I 



m^ 



A NEW CUIDB- 



') 



LESSON W 

\ Go from that man whowill hurt you; amll 
Imn no man thyself. I 

All men gcrout of the M-ay, and do not tnindl 
G^>d, . "^ ' 

Gad doth see u^, arid all that we do* 
1 will sing of the Lord all the day long. 

LESSON VJT. ' 

With my lips do 1 tell of the law of God ;| 
and I will talk of his word. • 

1 will rurt the way of thy law ; O help me in itj 
I am glad that the Lord doth lend an car to 
me: for, this, 1 will call on him, and pay any 
vow. -^ ^1 



TABLE VI. • 

tVords or Four Letters, xlz Ttco Consonants and two ' Vou^. > 
e.s r the latter Vowel serving only to lengthen the iSound of\ 
tnejormcr, excejjt ivhere it «,>• otherwise marked, • 

UABH. Robe, Face lace mace race. Dice lice I 
mice nice rice vice. Fade jade made wade. Hidel 
ride side tide wide. 11 ude. Safe. Life wife. Cao^e 
page rage sage. Ilnge. Bake cake make rake 
sa^e take; Like pike. Joke poke yoke. Duke 
puke; Gale pale sale tale vale. 

File mile pile tile vile wile. Hole mole pole.. 
Mule rule. Came dame fame game lame name 
same tame. Lime time. (Come) dome fome 
home. Fume. Bane lane mane pane. Dine. Fine 

Xcino lino «vi**^^ «^*..x^ -.* • ^ r-^ ^ ■- . ' 

...... ...x^. ,,,,,,^ piH5j Vine wine, f uoiie) (ffone) 

(none). Bone hox^e tone. Tune. 



TO THE ENGLISH TONGUE. 



it 



^ Cape rape tai)e (gape). l>ipe ripe wipe (type), 
^ope hope nrope iH>pii rope sope. Care dare fare 
hare mare pare Here mere (were). Dire fire 
hire iiiire sire tire wire. Core gore more pore 
Ke tore wore. Cure pure sure. Base case. Rise 
[rise wise). ]Jose.(doze hose) (lose) (nose ro6e>. 

Use (use muse). Else. Bate. Date fate frate 
late late mate pate rate. Bite kite mite rite. Dote 
note note vote. Lute mute. Cave (have) pave 
rave save wa;ve. Dive five hive (give live sieve). 
|iove (dove 1 >ve).raove). Gaze maze. 8eize^ 

"■ nil 

More easy Lesions on the foregoing Tahle.<i, consuHns ofr 

iy ord6 not ercecding Four LeUei-9, ' 
^ L£SS0N I, 

N^-^w. "^""^^ '"'"^ ^^^ ^^^^^ we say and do. 
i his liie IS not long ; but the life to come ha^ 
\o end. 

We must love them that do not love us, as well . 
[s them that do love us. 
We must pray for them that hate us. 

LESSON ir. 

We must do to all men as we like to be done to, . 
i he Lord he is God ; it is he that hatli made us., 
lie must live well, that will die well. 
He dodi live ill, who doth rioc meud. . 

LESSON III. 

A bad life will make a bad end. 

We must let .the tima past put us in minJ of: 

e ill we have done. ; I • 

^e kind to all men, and hurt not thyselft^H^. 



t^ 



A NEW OUlDi: 



h'i 



M*. 



X^KSSON IV. 

Woe be to me, if* 1 live iiot well. 

We can hide no work from God ; ^r the Lorl 
he is God, and he is Lord of all. 

Mind what is best : do all that is just } and love 
all whom you have to do with. 

LESSON V. 

He that doth love God, God will love him. 
One God dof-h rule all. The Lord is God. 
None is like to God, and we are all in his banc 
The Lord is my king ; he is Lord of all : ai 
by the word of the I^ord all was made. 

. .• . LESSON VI. 

God i^ the most high God ; he sets up merj 
and he doth help them that are just. 

Go not far from me, O Lord my God. 

The time will come when all men must bepuj 
in the dust. 



TABLE VIL , 

Words of Four Letters j viz. Two Consonants and a Diphthonl 

AjAID maid paid.* Fail jail nail rail sail tail 
Maim. Fain gain main pain rain vain. Fail 
hair pair. Bait wait. -Void. Soil. toil. Coin joir 
Daub. Thou. I^ud.- Foul soid.' Pour Pour (yourj 
Gout rout. Flee free knee thee tree. Deed fe( 
heed need seed wieed. ' 

Beef. Leek meek seek week. Feel heel m 
Seem. Been kiei^n seen. Deep keep peep weej 
Deer jeer l^r peer. Feet meet* Good hood wooj 
Hoo^ r^j >f; Book cook hook look took rook. Coij 
fbdl pooi tool (wool). Doom room. Moon no( 
soen. C<?op hoop^ loop (sjO"P0 



%0 THE ENGLISH TONGUE. 



23 



Door poor. Foot soot. Boot hoot root. Flea plea. 
JEase. Dtad head lead (read bead). Deaf (leaf). 
Leak reak weak. Deal heal meal seal. Beam seam 
team. Lean mean wean. Heap leap reap. Bear tear 
Iwear (dear fear hear near ^'ear). Heat meet seat. 
iLoad road toad. Loaf. 8oak. Coal goal. Foam 
[roam. Roar. Boat coat goat moat. Oath. Coax. 

Chaw draw flaw gnaw spaw tha\y. Dawn i'awu 
llawn pawn. Brew knew slew stew (shew). Lewd. 
JBlow crow flow glow grow know slow snow s'ow 
|(piowbrow). Bowl fowl howl. Down gown town, 
pi ay clay dray fray gray play pray slay stay 
jsway. Grey they whey. Lieu. View. Sloe (shoe), 
[Clue glue true. 

More easy Lessons on the foregoing Tables, consisting of 
Words not exceeding Four Letters, 

W LESSON I. 

HEN we go out, and when we come in, .we 
[are not out of the eye of God, 

Wheu we pray to God with a pyre mind, he 
will hear us and help us ; but if our mind be not 
pure when we pray to him, then {le will not hear 
lus. 

All the day long, God does mind what we do 
Iwitb our time. 

LESSON II. 

1 he word of God is true 5 it is gone from Jii^ 
|lips, and will. come to pass. 

He that took on him the form of man to save 
jus, is God, and came down from God. 

This is he, who, when he came, did shew to us 
the way of life, that we may work the work of 



:M 



A NEW GUIDE 



j I 



it ', 



I ' 






iM 



III 



LESSON III. 

AH my joy is in the Lord, and in tlif m that lovel 
•his ways.' 

The Lord is nigh to all them that call on him.j 
It is good to draw near to God, that he may I 

draw near to us. 

I will call on thje Lord for help, that I may be 

•safe from them that liate me. 

LESSON IV. 

The ways of Grod are not like the ways of man. 
The Lord God is God of gods, and Lord of aJl. 
Just and true are thy ways, O Lord God : thy 
^word is true, 

I am the; Lord 5 I AM that J AM ; this is my 
jiamco 

LESSON V, 

The word was with God, and the word was 

<jrod. 

None but God can tell what is to come. 

I must not do an ill act ; if I have done it 
once, I must do so no more. 

No man can say, he has seen God j for nonel 
hath seen him, and none tan see him. 

LESSON VI. 

;He that doth love God, will keep his laws. 
All ye that love the Lord, see that ye hate sin. 
I will love thee, O Lord, as long as I live. 
Keep mc, Q God, for my hope is in thee. 
My son, call on the Lord for help, that you 
may be safe from them that hate you. 



Mi I 



«' 



TO THE ENOLISII TONGUE* 



on 

•wo' 



TABLE VIII 

Words nf Five, Six/^x, Letters, viz. One Voixei y and the rest 

Consonants. 

XhIIOB. Scrub skmb. Shred thred. S^prig. 
^crap strap. Scrip strip. Sprat. Split sprit. Strut. 
Black clack brack crack knack slack smack 
snack stack track. Check speck. Brick chick 
stick snick trick. Block dock crock flock frock 
jinock shock stock. 

Chuck cluck plucic fe-ack struck. Tract. 
Strict. Didst midst. Chaff staff. Cliff skiff istiff 
>vhiff. Scoff. Bluff gruff snuff stufj; Craft graft 
shaft. Cleft theft. Dwtit shift swiil thrift. Eifght 
light might night right sight -bright flight fright 
slight. Child. Scold. Chalk stalk. 

(Shall) small stall scrall. Dwell shell sm-Il spell 
swell. Chill skill spill still shrill. Psalm. Wielm. 
Whelp. Shalt. Smelt spelt. Spilt stilt. Plumb 
thamb. Cramp stamp. Shrimp. Plump stu^np 
thump trump. Nvmph. Brand grand stand 
strand. Bleiiii spend. Blind grind. 

Bring iiing sting swing thing spring string. 
Thong strong ti.rong wrong. Tongs. Luiurs. 
Blank flank frank plank prank shank thank. 
Brink chink drink shrink stink think. Drunk 
trunk. Chant grant plant slant scant. Scent 
spent. Flint print. Front. 

Blunt brunt grunt. Third. Sword. Scarf (dwarf 
wharf). Scurf. Spark stark. Shirk. Stork. Twirl 
>yhu'i. Churl. Charm (swai-m). Storm. S^tern. 
Scorn thorn. Shorn (sworn). Churn spurn. Sharp.' 
Chirp. Smart start (thwart). Flirt shirt skirt! 



^V^.O T«4- f i-\\-\ yy^m% 



y-'T/Ui. 



^ ^ 



ZiliXJi. w 



.....\ 



siiOrt^ xiiun spurt. 



O 



m 



A' NfiW CUIDJS 



Clash flasli gnash slash trash. Flesh fresh 
tliresh. Swish. Blush flush plush biubh crusl 
thri'.sh. Flask. Brisk whisk. Clasp grasp. C.'Hsp 
Brass gkss grass ciass. Bless dress prc^ stress 
Bliss. Ci CBS dross gloss (gress). ''iriiss. Blast 
^Bl^st chest drest. Twist wrist. Ghist. 

Crust trust Uirust. Snritli. Breth cloth frotl 
f sloth). I'luth. Birth. Icrih- (worth). W-crld 
•Hanch iai^ch branch stanch. Beach tcnek- sttrull 
.drench wrei;ch. Airh mart h parcli starch. lx:cli 
Birch. (Porch) torch scoreii. Lurch church 
Corps, liars- niarsL\ First thiist 

Bin^st curst dmst, BMch catrii hatch I'ttc 
match : atch snatch i hatch (vmHcIi). letvh keic 
bketCii. Itch ditch hitch })itch liath stitcli tw it< 
(Avhi;^0. Botch notch scotch Crutch. Lciiiit 
strength. T'tnuh. Nir^th. l^ilth. >Sixth. 

Som^ easy Lessons on the Jcregoing TaMes, consicthg ( 
JVoi:ds not exceeding Ibix Lcitcrs, 
LESSON I. 

Love r^ot the world, nor the things that ail 
in the world 5 for all that is in the world, tli] 
lust of the flesh, and the lust of the e} e, is m 
of God, but is of the world. 

In God 1 have put luy trust, I will not fd 
:^^hat flesh can do to me. 

LESSON li. 

Thou shalt love tlie Lord thy God with all tlj 

/nind, and with all thy soul, and with all thy niipll 

All things wax old, and fade ; but Gcd is, ar 

will be tlie same : he hath no end. 

The Son of Gcd came to wash us ftotn all 
^( lie might save us : 1 will be^lad in his iiaiii| 



TO TilE ENGLIStt TONGUE* 



2!? 



LES30^f ITI. 

tot m all do tliat which is the best, clnd this- 
[will be the wiiy to make God love U3. 

Tiie Lord God shall bless me, as my right way 
[has been seen by him ; a.nd as my hands have 
jeeii pure, so shall he save me. 

The way of the Lord h pure, and &o is his 
word ; he helps ail them that trust in him. 

LESSON IV. 

Some men will. pass by an 111 act, and some 
kvlll not ; but if we will fern- God and keep hi3- 
-'ord, he will not cast us oit*. 
Let all the world fear the Lord. 
Flee from vice, and love that wiiich is good, 
fhe fear of God is with them 'that love iiim. 

L ESSOIN v» 

We have one Gjd, by whom are all thino-g 
Imade. " 

The works of man are riot like God's works. 

Mind what tlie man of God says j for he shews 
to you the way of life. 

God shall rid me from my strong foes, and 
from them which hate me ; for they are too 
strong for me. 

LESSON vr. 

God hath made my feet like harts* feet ; and 
^le hath sen me up on high. 

O my God, I cry to thee in the day-time, but 
thou dost not hear j and in tlie night 1 take no 
rest. - ' 

We will call rtn fliv nomo n T ^-,i ^- ^i-_ii 



^ho 



u save us : we wi 



lou w 



ilt keep 



il put 



us. 



our trust in thee, and 



28 



A NB^V GVTDT, . 



TABLE IX. 

U'urcli- ofFive^ S/x, SfC.Lellers, viz. Tivo Voxeeh and the stcr 
Consonants ; the latta- Voxvcl senving onf^ to lengthen the 
Sound <)ftheforvicr, except ivhere it ts ot/ienvi. e marked. 

ijRIBE tribe scribe. Globe. Brace cliace grace 
place space. Price slice s])ice thrice twice. Since 
spruce. Blade shade spade tvade. Chide pride 
slide stride. Qiafe. Knife strife. Stage. Drake 
flake shaRe snaFce stake spike strike. Broke choka 
cloke smoke stoke stroke. 

Scale stale. Smile stile while. Strole scrole 
whole. Blame flame fViune shame. Scheme theme. 
Chimc^ crime prime sliine. Crane plane. Brine 
shine swine thine twine.. Drone prone stone 
throne. Prune. Crape grape shape. Gripe tripe 
stripe snipe.. Slope. 

Blare glare share scare snai'e spare. There 
where, spire shire. Score shore snore store. Chase 
([ihrasc). Close prose (chose closo).those (whose), 
Prate scate slate state. Smite spite white. Blote 
smote. Flute brute. Brave crave grave knave 
shave slave stave. Drive strive thrive. 

Clove grove strove. (Glove shove.) (Prove), 
Bhze glaze craze graze. Prize. Chance dance 
prance trance. Hence fence pence thence whence 
sense. Mince priiice since. Once. (^Sconce). Dunce. 
Badge fadge. 

Edge hedge wedge sledge pledge fledge. Ridge 
bridge. Dodge lodge. Judge grudge trudge.. 
Range change strange. Hinge singe cringe fringe 
twinge twinge. Plunge spunge. Farce. (.^Scarce), 
Jierse verse. Horse. (Worse). 



TO THE ENGLISH TONGUE. 



k'9 



€urs(3 nwrsQ purse. Barge large charge. Serge 
Terge. Forge. (Gorge.) Urge purge. Taste haste 
p^ste waste. Bathe swathe lathe. Blithe sithe tithe' 
writhe. Lothe clothe. Lapse. Halve. Delve helve 
twelve. Carve starve. Serve swerve. Selves 
Wolves. Plague vague. Rogue vogue. Tongue. 

More east/ Lessons on the foregoing Tables, conslMng of 
Words not exceeding ISlx Letters, 

S LESSON- I. 

HKW me the right way, O Lord, and ffinda 
me m it. . 

P think not on my past sins ; but think on me/ 
U Lord, for my good,. 

All the paths of the Lord are truth to such a^ 
keep his laws. 

He that doth love the Lord shall dwell at ease, 
and his seed shall have the land. 

LESSON in 

Put thy trust in God, and he will help thee. 

It IS a good thing to give thanks, and to call- 
on the name of the Lord. 

Let us sing psalms to the Lord our God. 

\y heii thou Shalt make a vow to the Lord thv> 

Ood, thou shalt not be slack to pay it 

LESSON in. 

That which is gone out of thy lips, thou shalt 
keep : and if a man vow to the Lord, he shall 
keep his oath. 

Let us stand fast.. Let us strive to be eood 
^^ Charge them that are rich in this world. th;f 
wicy ciu good, and be glad * — '— 



m 



C 2- 



give-. 



Vihi 






A KRW aui0e 



LESSON IV, 

Tilm yourselves from nM your sins ; else God" 
W&l whet his ^word, and bend his bow. 

t^eit us judge ourselves, that God. may not 
jftidge us. 

Let us nQt^jkpind high tilings, nor.be as those 
ace who do their works to be seen ofmenv 

LESSON V. 

Thanks be to the Lord, for he.hath be^n kind • 
totme in a strong place. 

J^e strong all ye that trust in the Lord.- 
Tear the Lord all ye that dwell in the word.. 
The man is blest whose trust is in the Lord- 
Keep thy> tongue and thy lips Irom ill* 

LESSON VI. 

See that ye lose not those things that be good. 

The Day of Christ is at. hand; and he, will 
jmlge the world, both the quick and dead. . 

We shall all change at the last trump ; and all 
,ftat are in the giave simll.then come foith,,that 
^od may j ndge them . 



F 



TABLE X.: 
Words' cGti'i: ting of Five, /S>>, l^c. iMters^ miz.A Dij)ttion^ 
and Ike rest Ccn^nnantSy except some fehx-Vihiui end in ejina}. 

'^. HAIL snail trail Claim. Brain chain grain 
slain stain train sprain strain. Paint faint saint 
taint. Uaise praise. Faith saith. Heir their. Eight 
freight weight (height). Voice choice. Broil 
spoil. Joint point. Noise poiscj Moist. Quart. 
Quick. Quench. Squib. Squiit. Fraud. Lai gh. 



TO THE KKCLIsn lOliGVK. 



gi^ 



Daunt haunt taunt vaunt flaunt slawnt. Cause 
^ause pause. Couch pouch vouch crouch slouch/ 
(toucli). Cloud cioud proud shroud. Cough trough 
(tough). I'lough slough (dougli ihough) 
(through) Ougjjt bonglit Ibught nought sought 
brought thoug]i}:(diOug!it). 

Mould. (could should woiild). Cunce bounce?: 
pounce. Bovv.d li(»Ljnd pojjr.d rouud sound 
ground (wound). Count nvjuut. Moin'n. Couist^ 
House louse mouse (sj>ouse roii^:e). Clout duubf 
seout shout spout stout trout sprout. Aloulh soutiv 
(youth)^ Fourth. Three. 

Leech speech. Bleed breed speed steed Cheek 
sleek. Kneel steel ^sheel. Green queen screen - 
spleen. Creep sheep sleej) steep sweep. Cheer steer 
sneer.- Cheese. (Geese fleece). Fleet sheet street 
sweet. Teeth seeth. Sleeve. Freeze sneeze squeeze. ' 
Blood flood (stood). Proof. 

Brook shook. Schot)l stoc»l (wool). Blocm 
broom groom. Spoon swoon. Droop {jcoop sloop 
stoop. Floor. Goose loose (noose choose),. Shoot. 
Tooth (booth smooth). Eiich reach preach teach. 
Dread tread spread (knead pleau). SheaK League*. 
Bleak sneak speak steak sqtjcak. 

Realm. Dealt. Health wealth. Cream drcaiiv 
steam stream. Clean gleaustean. Cleanse. Cheap. 
Clear shear smear spear (swear). Search. Earl 
pearl. Earn learn. Earth dearth (hearth). Heart; - 
Fleas please tease. 

Cease lease crease peace. East beast feast least 
(breast). Bleat cheat treat wlieat (c^reat). Sweat 
threat. Death breath (heath sheath). Breathe 
sheathe wreathe. Heave leave weave cleave. Coach 
poach roach broach. Broad. Gr©ah. 



'»{ 



I 



f ■ 



^. 



A NEW GUIDE 



B;)ast roast toast. Fioat throat (groat). Brief] 
cliiefgritf thief. Niece piece. Fiend (triendU 
Fierce pierce. Field yield shield. Priest. Grieve 
thieve Giiard. Suit fniit. Build. Guide. Guile. 
Qiiilt. Juice. Bruise. Brawl crawl drawL. Brawn 
prawn. Screw .s!)rew strew threw, 'lluow. Known 
thrown (brown clown crown drown frowH> 

More easj Lesr.om on the foregoing Tables, 
— LESSON I. 

1 WILLgive thanks to thee, O Lord, with aUi 
my tieart j and will praise tiij name. 

1 v/ill ])raise the name of God with a song j for 
this shall jjicase the Lord. 

Serve thfe Lord with fearr, and let your heart 
stand in awe of him, 

lie tlut fears not God is in the way to death. 

LESSON^ II. 

Great is (he Lord, and great is his name. 

Seek the Lord while he maybe found; call on 
him while he is near.^ 

Trust in the Lord with all tliy heart. 

in thee^ O Lord, have I put my trust ; let m^ 
not be put to shame j but help me, lend thine 
ear to me, and save me. 

LESSON III. 

Thou, O Lord, art the tlung that I long for j 
tbou art my hope from my youth. 

Q let my mouth be full of thy praise, that 1 
may sing of thee all the day long. 

Cast me not from thee in the time of age ; and 

I will go forth in the strength of the Lord 
God ; and will praise thee more and more. 






TO Tllir EJJGLJSII TONGUE. 



^• 



LESSON rv. 
Thou, O God, hast taught me from my youth 
|np till now ; and: I will tell of thy ffceat works. 
Great things are tJicy that thou hast done :. Q 
rod, who is like to thee? 
Tlie Lord doth know tlie way^ of good men, 
md the way of bad men shall come to nought. 

I did call on the Lord with my voice, and he 
heard me out of his liill. 

EESSOX V. 

ye sons of men, how long will ye hate God 9 
^now this, that the Lord will choose the man 

fhat is good ? when I call on tire Lord, he will- 
hear me. 

Stand in awe, and sin not : search vom* own 
heart by yourself, and be still. 

Pour out your praise to God j and put your 
trust in the Lord. 

LESSON VI. 

1 will lay me dowaih peace^ and take my rest j 
ibr it is thou, O Lord, that dost make me dwell 
in peace. 

O hear thou my voice, my king and my God y 
for to thee will Ppray. 

My help doth come from God, who doth keep 
|{ill them that are true of heart : and for this I 
will praise the name of the Lord most high. 



I 



3^ 



A NEW GUIDE' 



OF DISSYLLABLES. 

^ ling ana fr,nunaation are ncarl.j the mme. 

B-sencc bliin-dcr com-fort (lif.fer 



A 



a-coni 

ac-tor 

ac-tress 

acl-((cr 

ad- vent 

ai-ter 

al-liitn 

al-so 

ani-ber 

am -bush 

an -gel 

a-ny 

ar-bor 

ai't-ful 

ar-tist 

artless 



boi-der 
bo-som 
bri-er 

brim-stone con<-ord 



bro-kcn 

biif-iet 

but-tcr 

Ca-per 

car-rot 

car-ter 

Chaf'-finch 

chaiTi-ber 

chan-nel 

chap-man 

chap-ter 

cha-sten 



Back-ward chat-ter 



ba-kcr 

bal-lad 

bank-cF 

ban-ter 

bant-ling 

bap-tist^ 

bar-ber 

bar-rel 

bash-ful 

bot-ter 

bit-ter 



ches-nut 
child-ish 

ehil-dren 
chilly 

chop-per 

cliiirch-man cuUnre 
ei-der cnni-bcr 

cin-der ciit-Ier 
cler-gy 






coKlect di-et 



com-meut din-ner 
com-mcrce' doc-tor 
com-mon doc-trine 
do-cr 
do-tage 
dra-per 
drcs-ser 
dros-sy 

drug, get 

drum-mcr 

drunk-ard' 

dul-lard 

dung-hill 

du-ty 

dy-er 

Kdg-ing 

eLder 

cm- her 3 

em-bleiu 

en-ter 

en-gine 

e-ven 

e-vil 

ox-tent 
Fac-tor 



con-duct 

con-quest 

con-serve 
con-snl 

con-test 

con-tract 

cou.trile 

con -vent 

con- verse 

con-vert 

cor-ner 

cost-ly 

craf-ty 

cra-zy 

crib-bage 

cri-or 

cru>el 

crup-per 



lAir-hna: 
tu-ai 



fan- 



-got 
cy 



TO mE ENGLISH TONGUiS. 



^5 



far-nrcr 

fa-tal 

fat-ling 

ie-inolc 

fen-der 

fen -n el 

ier- ret 

i'j-ver 

fid-dl^r. 

lil-let . 

fi-iial 

iir in.'v 

iia- 



i/T 



i iH- 



It 



H:i:c-ri^i 



tiJV- 



i ■' J. 



11 ;i-e lit 
ibd-der 

ibro-taste 
for-ty 

fraii-tic 
fret-ful 
fro- ward 

iru-4^al 

fu-el 

fiiii-nel 

far-loi^^: 

Gal-km 

gai-1^- 



game-some 

game-stev 

gam-iuon 

gan-dor 

gar-laiul 

gar- meat 

gur-ret 

gar-tta- 

gcii-tiy. 

gi-ant 

gib bet 

g;p.^y 

^v> t < 1 V 1' 

> ) i ' t . *■ f "• . 

L^'lo-rv 



i r i ! > ; 



•icli 



g' =*C'- ' 

giacj-fid 

gras-s}^ 

grate-fbl 

gritty 
gru-el 

gun-ner 
gun-shyt 
gus-set 
gt It- ter 
Ham-let 
ham-iner 
hand ful 
han4-sel 



Imn-dy 

luing-ei' 

Jiang-ings 

Iui|r-T)y 

Ijarctsliip 

bar-dy 

bardot 

bar-»3er 

bai'E5;-born. 

bnr-A'Gst 

i'!avclv;'t 

be ip-lid 

l:^.-lliit 

iiii]-der 
biiid-niast. 
liini-iance 
\ioAy 

lioine-iy 

bope^Ld 

bor-net 

bor-rid 

borse-man 

bu-ujaii 

bun-dr<3d 

bun- ter 

bijit-fid 

bus band 

I-cy 

i-dal 

in-fant 

in. most 

in-sect 

iU'Side 

in^stance 



in-stcp 
iii-to 
in-ward 
u\y 
Jcs-ter 
joe key 
j'^biy ' 
judg-morij; 

jiig-uier 

jadep 

ui-rv 

Ken*nc»l 

kci%nel. . 

kin-dred 

king-dom 

kins- man 

kitch-ou 

Lad-der 

la-dy 

hm-cet 

landdord 

Lind-maik 

buid-scape 

lan-tejn 

bip-pet 

bi])-vving 

lat-tci' 

la-zy 

le-gal 

let-ter 

li-ar 

like4v: 

lim-*beif . 
lim^aer 



M' 



A NEW GUIDE 



II 



li-ning 

liii-nct 

li-oti 

iit-ter 

lodg-er . 

lot-ty 

lone-ly 

lone-some 

lord-ly 

lord-ship 

luc-Vy 

lug.gagc 

Ma kor 

mam-mon 

niun-fu-l , 

man-ly 

inan-na 

inan-iier 

ma-ny 

mar-gin 

niarjvct 

ma-tron 

iiiax-im 

med-ley 

mem-ber 

mer-cy 

iner-ry 

mil-ler 

mit-tens 

mo-disli 

j^io-ment 

morn-ing 

A...\ 

«rot-to 



imid-dy 

iniU'dcr 

imir-mur 

imit-ter 

Kap-kin 

nice-ly 

ttim-ble 

ninc-ty 

ninth-kv 

num-ber 

nut- meg 

Of^er 

of-fice 

on-set 

or-der 

or-gan 

ost-ler 

o-vcr 

Pa-gan 

]>aiiuper 

})an-'nel 

pan-try 

pa-per 

pii-pist 

par-eel 

par- don 

pa-.rentii 

par-snip 

par-lour 

par-rot 

part-aer 

par-ty 

pat-tern 

pave-ment 



pen-cil 

pen-ny 

pq)-^)er 

per-lcc't 

])er-son 

phan-tom 

j)ic-turc 

l)ig.gin 

j)ii-fbr 

pil-grim 

pil-lar 

pi-lot • 

})i-])er 

pip-kin 

plat-form 

platitcr 

pli*ant 

plij-mage 

plum-met 

po-ct 

pos-set 

pot-ter 

pre-cept 

pru-dent 

pupn|)y 

pur4)lind 

pur-chase 

pur-pose 

Quar-rel 

quar-ter 

qai-et 

Rab-bit 

rag-ged 

ram-mer 



ra-kof 

ran-dom 

ran-^cnjc 

ran-ger 

rant-cr 

ra-tlier 

re-id 

rcc-tor 

rcm^nant 

ren-der 

ren-nct 

ri-dcr 

ri-ot 

rob-ber 

rub4>ish 

ru-by 

rug^ged 

ru-in 

ni-lei' 

xum-mage 

run-ner 

ru-ral 

Sa-cred 

sad-dler 

sale-ly 

safe-tv 

sal-ad 

sal.|ii|r 

san-dy 

sat-chel 

sa-tin 

scab-bard 

scar-ioiQ 

scam-pcr 



rum-mage 



scar-ioiQ 



pscan-dal 
|'8can-ty 
scar-let 
8cat4er 
scol-lop 
scom-fnl 
scra-per 
scul-ler 
sc-cret 
sel-dom 
self-ish 
I sen-tence 
ser-mon 
ser^pent 
ser-vant 
(sex-ton 
|slia-dy 
ihame-ful 
shufp-en 
sharp-er 
?hat-ter 
^hep-herd 
3hiJ-ling 
^1iort-Jy 
^hiit-ter 
^ig-nal 
si-Ience 
^i-lent 
^il-ly 

^il-ver 

5im-per 

^im-pler 

in-ner 



TO THE ENOLISH TONOUE. 



six-fold 
six-ty 
skil-fhl 
skin-ny 
skip-per 
slan^der 
slat-tern 
slen-der 
. fili-my 
slip- per 
sloth-ful 
slug-gard 
slug.gish 
filum-ber 
slutitish 
smo-ky 

smiig-^er 
snap-pisJi 

so-ber 



87 



sor-rel 

sot-tish 
spi<^y 

spi-der 

spin-net 

spin-ner 

spinster 

spitc-ful 

splen-did 
splen-dor 
splin-ter 
spun-gy 

o-fe'-- 

^stam-mer 
Stan-dish 



start-Iish 
' stem-Iy 
Stin-gy 
sto-ny 
stpp-page 
stop-per 
sto-ry 

8trange-ly 
•fitran-ger 
8trong-]y 

stB-dent 

stu-pid 

subject 

sud-den 

su-et 

suf.fer 

sul-len 

uiil-ly 

sul-try 

sum-mer 

sum-mon 

«un-der 

sup-jper 

sur-face 
fiur-ly 

sur-name 

Tab-by 

tal-Jy 

tame-Iy 

tan-ner 

ta-per 

tap-sler 

tar-dy 

tar-nish 
D 



tat-Ier 
tat-ter 
tem-per 

ten^-pest 

ten-der 

ten-dril 

tenth, ly 

tgt-ter 

thank-ful 

there-fore 

thregh-er 

thread -bare 

thun-der 

time-ly 

ti-dings 

til-Jage 

tim-ber 

tin-der 

ton-nage 

tor-ment 

tor-rent 

to^ry 

to-tal 

tra-der 

trans-porfc 

trench-er 
tri-al 

trot-ters 

tru-ant 

tru-Iy 

trum-pet 
tu-lip" 

tum-bJer 
tu-mult 



S8 



A. NEW GUIDE 



tun-nel 

Uir-key 

lur-nip 

Uir-n(?r 

luni-pike 

turn-stile 

tu-tor 

Va-cant 

"va-grant 

val-ley 

var:nisli 

vcl-lum 
Ycl-vct 
ven-ture 
>er-min 



'A 



ii 



ves-sel 
vic-tim 
vin-tage 
A i-pcr 
\ ir-giu.^ 
vi-tal 
vo cal 
vuUgar 
Ud-d^r 

iiThdef 

iin-lo 

iip-per 

iip-sliot. 

i:p-sid<? 



ut-niQst 

lit-ter 

iise-ful 

V/a-fer 

Ava-ger 

"vva-gcs 

v.akerful 

.\van-.der 

^van■tou 

\\ard>robe 

war-like 

war-rant 

wasp-ish 

\vaste-iul 

Avcd-ding 

wel-ihre 



wes-tcFH 

Avest-ward 

Avet-shcd , 

V, barf-age 

vher-ry 

VvhiiD'Sey 

Avbis-rper 

wil-fUl 

Avil-ling . 

\vin-1»er 

wis-dom 

wo-ful 

wer-sliip 

M'ortb-less 

wor^ . y 

Yon-der 



S>m:i easy Lessons on thejoregoing Tables, consisting (^ 

IVcrds not exceeding Ixvo Si/iltti)les, 

LESSON I. 

It is God tbat girdeth me with strength of war ; 
i ,11 d mak eth my, w ay , per feet . 

He makcth my feet like harts*, feet ; and set- 
teth me upon high. 

My iocs shall cry, but tl^ere shall be none to 
nelpthem: yea, even unto the Lord shall they | 
cry, but he shall not hear them. 

For this cause will 1 give thanks unto thee,| 
O Lord, and sing praise unto tliy .name. 

LESSON II. 

Unto thee, O Loid, will I lift up my soul : inyj 
God, I have put my trust in thee. 

Lead me fojrth in thy truth, and learn me ; foj 
thou ait.tlie God oi my iiealth ; in thee hatij 
fc„##ii lay hope all the day long. 



to THE ^ENGLISH TONGUE. "3^ 

Call to mind, O Lord, '-hy tender mercy, \vl|ic:i 
hath been oFold. 

The secret of the Lord is AVith them that fear 
him ; and he will shew them his law. 

LESSON in. ' ^ ■ 

Hear my voice, O Lord, when I cry'iMo?fiice^ 
have mercy on me and hear me. 

hide not thou thy face from me j nor cast 
thy servant from thee in thy wrath. 

Teach me thy way, O Lord, and lead me in 
t!ie rii^ht wa^\ 

P my soul, wait thou on the Lord ; he stronir, 
an 1 he sh ill comfort t'line heart j and put thou 
thy tru:]t ill the Lord. 

LESSON IV. 

Unto.thee will I cry, O Lord, my strength : 
think no scorn of me, lest if thou make as though 
thoir didst not heaiv I be made like them that go 
down into the pit. 

The Lord is my strength and my shield; my 
heart hath trusted in him, and I am helped : 
therefore my heart danceth for jo}-, and in my 
song will I praise him. 

LESSON V. 

1 sought the Lord, and he heard me : yea, he 
saved me out of all my iear. 

^ O taste and see how good the Lord is : blessed 

IS the man that trusteth in him. 

O fer the Lord, ye that are his saints ; for 

tiiey that tear him, want no good thing, 

Ihe lions do want and suffer much ; but thev 
- ,..^.^ ;.,,c i.;;iii jjnaa want no manner of 



"-•-15. LliC i^'v/i'U, 



thing th(>t is good.. 



40 



A^BW GOTDJJ-s 



LESSON YJ. . 

What man is he that lusteth tolive i andwouW 
fawi see good dayg ? 

Ktep thy tongue fiom evilj and thy lips that 
they speak no guile... 

The eyes of the Lord are avergood men :;.;and 
he doth iiear them when they pray. 

The Lord. doth save the souls of his servants : 
ar^ all they thatpnt their trust in him, shall not 
waathelp. 




"! 



TABLE II; . 

mrds accented an the first Syllable : theSpellmg and.. 
Pi^onmciathn : being digerent. 

brew-er cap-taih 

brew-house care-ful.. 

brew-is caa-£-less 

brick-kiln cen-sure. 

bi'Ide-groom chal-dron 

bride-maid cha^pel • 

brief-ly char-coal 

brightnuess cheap-en. 

bpi'^tle cheap-ness con-jure . 

brit-tle cheese-cake co'^py 
che^'^'resh cc'^'ver 
chil-blain coun-sel 
chiid-lwod coun-ter 
cho^^'licV CQun-ty 
cho-rua CQu''''ple 
clH'i^^siten. . cou''''rage 
chy'^iriist cre^dit 
ci'^stern : cre^^qce . 
ci'ty crick-et .: 

clafinoui: cra-eL : 



al*way , 

am*plc 

arf'(5lc 

a£r'%f r 

ap-pJc 

Ua/'lUnce 

bare-foot 

beast-iy 

beK-^y 

bel-Iow 

bird-hme 

bi'*shop 

ble^'misir 

bloo^'dy 

blu^ster 

bon-fire . 

bouiicl-ies: 

braw-iiy 



bro'lher 

buc-klo' . 

buck-rarn 

build'-cr 

bu'Ty 

bu'/shel 

bu^'ghy 

bu/'stle 

Cii-bie 



clean-ly>>* 
clear-ly ^ 
clo'^^'set 
co^'bkr 
co'^lour 
eo'^iimn ' 
co'^'^met 
com-rade 



breath Ue^i . ca^mei 



TO THE ENGLISH iONGUfii 



41 



s servants i 
^ shall nc4; 



cry^stal 

cup-board 

•u^^'stom 

Dai-ly 

dai-sy 

da^mage 

da^''inask 

daiigh-ter 

dead-ly 

d^flen • 

dear-ly 

debt-or 

de^^vit t 

de^-trbuai 

dinl-ple 

dii'-ty ' 

di'^'stanc^ 

distant 

doc-tress 

dou''''ble 

doubt-ful 

doWn-right 

dd^zen ■ 

dfa^^.gle • 

dri'^^'ven 

drow-sy 

di:i''''sky 

du'^'sty 

Ea-gle 

ea-gl6t 

earl-dom 



ear-wig 

e'^cho 

eight-fold 

eighth-ly 

eigh-ty 

ei-ther 

en-trails 

e'^ver 

eye-brow 

eye-sight 

eye-Sore 

Fair-ly 

fai-ry ' 

faith-ful 

fa^'^mine 

^^mish • 

fa-ther -' 

fa'^'thom ' 

fat-lten ^ 

fa-vour 

faiiVet 

fault-less 

faul-ty 

fear-less 

fea^^'ther 

fea-ture 

fe''''ster 

iid-dle 

fierce-ly 

muy 

fi'^'gui'e 

C3 



fla-vour 
flax-en 
flo^rld 
fol-low 
fon-dle 
foot-p^ce 
foat-pad 
foot-step : ' 
fo^reign - 
fore-thoug 
for-tress - 
found-er ' 
four-score 
fortrth-ly . 
frail-ty 
frec-kle ' 



frfeck-led 

freerk-ly 

free-hold 

free-fy 

free-stonie 

friehd-less 

iriend-ly ; 

fright-en - 

fri.ofht-ful 

fro'^lic 

fro'^sty 

fro^'^thy 

fruit-M 

fru^^strate 

Gain-ful 

is """ --- • 



ge^stnre 

ghost-ly 

gi'^blets 

gin^^gle 

giv-en 

giv-er 

gli'*'steh 

gloo-my 

good-ness 
:htgo''^speI 
go'^vern 
grace-less 
gran-deur 
grand-son 
gra^'Vel 
grea-sy 
great-ness 
griev-ous 
grist-ly 
gro^gram 
groimd-less 
grum-ble 
guilt-less 
gui*^nea 
Ha^^it 
has-sock 
ha'^vock 
haut-boy 
health-ful ' 
heal-thy 
Iieart-eri 



earfch-ly flanr-beau ga^^ther hear-ty 
car-thy fl.¥^sket ^ g^ta'-dy hea-then 

D 2 



4,2 



A NEW GUIDE 



hej 



.// 



Vy 



lea^ther 



heed-les3 le^vel 
heir-eS3 ; light-er 
high-Jy li'^mit 

quid 
quar- 



hii»li- 



Avax 



hi'^'gler 
hKther 



^y 



li 
1 






Li-cre 



lu'^str 



hoa- 

ho^^'iiiage lu^'sty 

Iio^'nest Ma'^am 

host- 



//. 



cs$ ma^gic 



nvd'Tice 



man 
man 



gle 
hcod 



ma"ster 



hour-ly 
Imm-ble 
hun-dredth 
hun^'ger 

liun''gry ma'^stili* 
''^ky match-less 
^e mea-sure 
in-siglit mea-dss 
Jauu-dice mt.''lon. 



hu 
Pma 



jew 



^l 



mc rit 



jonr-nrd me'^thod 



JO} 



-li 



I 



migh-ty 



juice-less min'^gle 



J^ii-cy 



mis-chief 



Kind-ne33, mi^'stress 
kna-vish. nii''sly 
kniglit-hoQd mo^'dern 
knock-er mo^'dest 
knbw-Iedge! mo''i;iarch 
knuc-kle mon-strous 
Lan'^guage mo^'ther 
!an"guid , mouth-f lii 
lau-rcl luoun-tain 



mourn-ful 

mus-cle 

mu'^sket 

mu'^slin. 

mu^'stard 

mu'^ster 

mu'^sty 

Name-less 

na'^sty 

naugh-ty 

need-ful 

neigh-bouis 

nei-ther 

ne^'vcr 

noi-sy 

nose-gay 

Ko^'thing 

no^'vel 

Oat-meal 

Pad-lock 

pam-pldet 

pas-tim« 

pa-stiy 

pa^'sture 

pa^'sty 

pea-cock 

pea-hen 

peer-ess 

pcei:-Je&5 

pe'^nance 

peo-ple 

pe^'ster 

phren-zy 

pi-ous 



pis-mire- 

pit-chy 

pla^'net ' 

plan-tain 

plea-aaut 

plea-sure 

poi-son 

po'^sture 

prat-tle 

preach-er 

prin-cess 

pro^'ducc * 

pro^'duct 

prof-fer 

pro^'gress 

l)rp'''mise 

pro''''spect 

pro^sper 

psalmrist 

psal-ter 

pu^'^'nish 

puz-zle 

Quick -en 

quick-Iy 

Kani-bic 

ra''''j)id 

rat- tie 

ra''''vtl 

read-er 

re^bel 

rc'^'fuge 

re''''lish 

rest-less 

rliu-ba;b 



TO THE ENGLISH T'JNGDE. 



iW 



ri-fte 

liz/gor 
n pen 

ri ''ver 
ri'vct 
rock.et 
ro guisli 
roli-er 
ro ''sin 
rougli-Iy 
ruffle 
Sal mon^ 
sail) plo 
sau cor 
sau cy 
sau-sage ' 
saAv-yer- 
scho^lar 
scis sors 
scrib hie 
scuf'.fle 
seam less 
sea son 
sha '^Jow 
shaMow 
shov/er 
sic kle 
sickness 
sim-ple 
si ''new 
sin Vie 



smug- gle 
soft ten 
so "lid 
soo "ty 
south ern 
span^'gle- 
speak, er 
spec kle 
spi ^'got 
spi"nagc 
spi "lit 
spit- tie 
spright ]y 
star tie 
sta'aure 
'st€a"dy 
steeple 
sti-fle 
stock ings 



ta^lent 
ta'^lon 
tan'^gle 
tat tie 
ta''vern 
teinpt or 
te^^naiit 
tex^.ture 
thatch er 
thick-en 
thiev isli 
thir-ty 

tho ''rough 
threat en 
thread die 
throw ster 
tic kle 
tick-lishv 

ti-ger 



straight-en tigress 
strait- ly tin'^ker 
straight, way tip pie 
stream er trai-tor 
strength.en trea ty 



sue kle 
sup-pie 
sure ly 
sure ty 
swar thy 
swca ty 
sweep- er 



tre'^bie 
trcs pass 
tri^'bute 
troop- er 
trou "ble 
twink-linff 



\ir tue 

vi"sit 

Up right 

Waist coat 

walnut 

wa ter 

weal- thy 

wea ry^ 

wea ver 

wed lock 

weighty 

wheedle 

whee ler 

where-fore 

whirl-pool 

whirl- wind 

whit-low 

wiek-ed 

wi''''dow 

wo "man 

won-drou$^ 

woo My 

wool-len 

work-man 

Worm-wood 

wor-sted 

Wran'^^gle 

wrap-per 

wre^^'stle 

wrist- band 



sweet ness v<^^/nnm 



Va^'lue wri-ter 



skew- 



er 



Ta ble 
lay. lor 






verjuce Zea^^'lot 
vi"6age zea-lous 



iii^ V 



A NEW GUIDES 



J^More c(U;jj Lessons on the foregoing Tahkft, consisting of 
IVordi not exceeding Two Sj/Uables. 

LfiSSON I," 

1 WILL always give thanki tinto the Lord j his 
praiise shall ever be in my mbuthJ- 

My soul shaiLmake her boast in the Lord : the 
humble shall hear of it/ and begkd. 

^ O praise the Lord with me ; and let us bless 
his name' ahvays, • 

I sought th(^ Lord, arid heheai^ me ; yea, he 
sa\^d me out of all my fear. 

j^ LESSON ti. 

The Angel of the Lord stande^h round them 
that fear him, arid saveth thei^i-- 

The Lord: doth order a gobd mdrf'^ going, andil 
maketh his way pleasant to him. 

Though he fall, he shall not be -cast off • for 
the Lord keepeth him. r 

The Lord is nigh, unto them that ^re of a con- 
trite heart : and will save such as^ are ofan hum- 
bly spirit. 

. LESSON in.* 

Thy mercy, O Lord, reacheth unto the hea* 
vens, and thy truth i^nto the clbuds: 

Thou, ' Lord, .«ha|t save both man and beafrt. 

How great is thv. mercy, O God ! and the 
childrenof men sEaJlputthto trust under the 
shadow of thy *wings; 

For with thee is the well of life'; arid in Ihy 



TC Tftfe EMGttSR Toir<iUB: 



4? 



LESSON IV. 

Have mercy on rifie, O Lord, for I am weak r 
jO Lordj heal me, for my bones* are vexed. 
^ My soul also is sor€ troubled ^ but, Lord, how 
long wilt thou punish im? 

Turn thee, O Lord, and save mysoul : O save' 
ne fdr tl^- mercy's sak€. 

For in death na man doth think on thee : and ' 
who will give thee thanks in the pit ? . 

LESSON V. • 

^ O clap your hands, all yepeople ; O sing unto^ 
rod witji the voice of joy ! 
Fbr the Lord is high, and to be feared : he is 
the great King over ail the earth I 

God is gone up witbu merry noise :- and the 
-ord with the sound df'a trump 1:^ 

O sing praises, sing praises unto our God : O 
Bing praises, sing praises unto our King ! 

LESSON VI. 

A wicked doer giveth heed, to false lips : and 
Hargiveth ear to a naiiglity toague* 
Cliildren's children are the crown of old men 5- 
id the glory of children are their fathers. 
Let a bear, robbedof her v/helps, meeta mar^>. 

Father than a fool in his folly. 
He that is first m his own cause seemeth just j 

mt his neighbour cometh and searcheth him. , 



46 



o 



Note. 'T^he 



A-BASE 

ab-hor 

a-bide 

-a-bout . 

a-broad . 

ab-rupt 

^b-sent 

ab-solve 

ab-8urd 

ac-cept 

ac-qiiire 

ad-dict 

ad*di?e9s 

ad-journ 

ad-mi t 

a-dore,. 

a-dorn 

atl*vaHce 

a-far 

af-^dlr 

af-finn: 

af-fright 

a^gainst 

a-lann, 

a-like 

al-lude 



TABLE III. 

AcMntofihefollmmng Wordvu on the secdnd 



a-lone 

a-maze 

a-mend 



a-inidst 

a-mong 

a-muse 

a-noint 

a-part 

ap-proach 

ap-pmv^e 

a-riso 

ar-reat 

a^'scend 

a ''spire 

a "stray 

attack 

at-tempt 

at- tire: 

a^vail . 

a-venge- 

a-void: 

a-wait 

a-waka 

a- way 

Be-ciiuso 

be-come 

be-fore 

be-friend 
be-giii 

be-have 
be-liead" 



-^be-lief 
be-lieve 
be-long 
be-love 
be-neath 
be-night 
be^queath 
be^ijet 
be-si(ie^ 
be-speak 
>be-twixt 
be-wail 



con -front 

con»fiise 

con-jure 

coH'^straiii 

conisume 

con-tempt 

cont-end 

con-tent 

con-tenin: 

con-vey 

oor-rect 

cor.rupt 



blas-phenfe cremate 
btt-reaii Dcbair 
Ca-^1 de-ceit 

ea^roiise deceive 
col-lect de-cide 
com-mence de-cJai^ 
Gom-plairi de-coy 
cotti-plaint dc-cease 
corn-pound deduce 
eom-pel deduct 
com-pjy ^ de-fect 
corn-pose de-lend 



a.mends be-liold 



com-pute 

con-ceit 

con-ce] t 

con -duct 

confine de-for_„ 

con*found dQ'fi2ivi^ 



de -fence 
de-fer 

dt-fy 






m 



^0 THE ENGLISH TONGUE. 



47 



on the secdnd 



de-grade 
de-light 
de-note 
de-part 
de-pose 
de-press 
de-pute 
de-rive 
de-scribe 
! de-sire 
de-spite 
de-spond 
' de-stroy 
de-tect 
de-test 
de-vise 
I di-rect 
dis-arm 
dis-band 
I dis-burse 
' dis-card 
I dis-claim 
dis-count 
dis-course 
Idis-joiut 
dis-iike 
dis-lodge 
dis-may 
dismiss 
dis-own 
dis-pel 
dis-place 
uis-piay 



df '-praise 
(lis-prove 
dis-robe 
dis-sent 
dis-serve 
dis-taste 
dis-linct 
dis-tort 
dis-triist 
dis- tract 
di"sturb 
dis-use 
di-vert 
di-vine 
dra^'^'gooii 
Ef.fect 
e-lope 
•cm-birfm 
em -bark 
em-broil 
t-mit 
en-chant 
en-close 
en-proach 
en-dear 
en-dorse 
en-dure 
en-force 
en-gage 
en-joy 
en-iarge 
cn-rage 
en-rich 



dis- 



cn-sue 

vn-thral 

en-throne 

en-tice 

cn-tire 

en-treat 

e''''spouse 

e^vade 

e-vent 

e-vince 

ex-alt 

cx-ccl 

ex-cise 

cx-cite 

ex-claim 

ex-cuse 

cx-empt 

ex-ert 

ex-ist 

ex-pand 

cx-panse 

ex pend 

ex-plode 

ex-pose 

ex-tend 

€.i-tort 

ex-tract 

ex-treme 

Fif-teen 

fore-arm 

fore-seen 

fore-si iew 

fore-SDcak 



for-get 
four-teen 
for-sworn 
ful-fil 

Gal-Iant 

ga-zette 

Uence-forth 

here by 

licre-in 

liere-of 

him-self 

Imbrue 

imkbnrsG 

im- merge 

im-merse 

im-pai;r 

ini-pale 

im-pend 

im-plant 

im-press 

im-print 

im-provc 

in-camp 

in*cite 

in-crease 

in-cur 

in-dent 

in-dulge 

in-fect 

in-fest 

in-firm 

in-flame 



:f 



pose en -roil 



e-spcak in-flict 
fbre-thiuk in-fiise 



4A 



A NEW GUIDE 



in-grafl 

in-grate 
I in-ject 

in-scribe 

in-slave 

io-snare 

iD*stil 

in-struct 
jn-sure 
/in -tense 

in-trjgue 
.in-tru^de 

in-trust 
J* n- verse 
Jn-veit ^ 
jn-vest 
an-vijte 
Mis-6hance 
mis-count 
-mis-deed 
'inis-doubt 
•is-give 
mis-hap 
mis-lead 
mis-like 
mis-name 
mi^'spend 
mis-plac9 
mis-prinit 

mis-rMJ^ 
mistake 
mis- trust 

mo-rose 



Ne-glect 

nine-teen 

Ob-struct 

ob-tain 

occur 

of-fence 

o-mit 

oprpress 

6ut-do 

jout-live 

out-strip 

Par-take 

peaT'-niain 

perform 

per-mit 

per-spire 

per-tain 

per-verse 

per-vert 

po-lite 

por-tend 

pre-dict 

pre-pjy-e 

pte-v^il 

pre'Scrrbe 

pre^'Serve 

pre-tend 

|>ro-jec.t 

pio-niote 

pro-ijoiince 

pro-pose 

pro-ppuiid 

prorFugue 

pro-tect 



pro-test 

pur-loin 

pur-suit 

Re-bate 

re-biike 

re-cant 

Te-ceipt 

re-cite 

re-cline 

T©-course 

Te-duce 

re-fer 

re-fit 

re-gain 

re-joice 

re-late 

re-lax 

re-ly 

re-rnark 

re-mind 

re-mit 

re-pair 

re-pnss 

,re-plete 

re-pose 

re-press 

re-priev,e 

le-print 

re-pu'lse 

rjCrprove 

re-stranit 

re-sume 

re-taii 

re-iraet 



re-trenfcb 

re-vere 

re-volve' 

re-ward 

ro-bust 

ro-mance 

Scru-toire 

se-dan 

se-duce 

se-lect 

sha^'lot 

six-teen 

sub-ject 

sub-join 

sub-lime 

sub-mit 

'Sub-om 

sub-tract 

su-pine 

8up-pose 

su-preme 

sur-mount 

siir-pass 

sur-vey 

sur-vjve 

su'*'spense 

Thcm-selvGS 

there-of 

thir-teen 

tra-diice 

tians-act 

tran^scerjd 

t ran "scribe 

trans-form 



TO TUB mcmtiTOSGUBi 



'i» 



trans-^ross un-cut 

trans-late iin-dress 

trans-plant un-fltir 

trans-port un-tit 

trans-pose iin-foid 



tre-pan 
Un-apt 
un-arm 
un-bar 
un-bencl 
iin-bind 
un-bolt 
im-cksp 
un-cloath 
run-close 



un-gani 

wn-glue 

un-hasp 

iM*i«-heard 

iin-hiugc 

un-hook 

un-horse 

tin-hiirt 

un-kind 

iin-lace 



un-lfke 

un.lo(k 

uii-made 

un-man 

iin-mask 

un-paid 

im-ripe 

un-safe 

un-say 

iin-screw 

iiH-seen 

un-sound 

un-taiiglit 

un-teacii 

un-tie • 



un-tnie 
un-triith 

4^ii-t\i^istV'"-^ 
tip-oa* • 
Whcreia| ■ ' 
whcrc-by^ 
where-in , 
where*aff' 
where^to.^ 
wliere-wfili'' 
with-al 
with- in ' 

with-draw • 
with-out ; 
with-stand 



T. 



fVord. not exceeding Txm H^UaUea. 
„„ . , I-ESSON I. ■■ 

I , ,\^f ^'<^'^«"d bath said in liis heart, Tusli Go^ 



£ 



^ 



A KteW GUli>B 



LESSON ItT, 

A man's lieart.cloth .clevisc his v,'aj : tutlbc 
Lord dptli cilrcci his steps. ./ . ' 

A tliviue ficntcnce is in the lips of the king : 
hh mouth dolli not Iransgress in judgment. 

A just, vvqiglit and bal^uice pre the Lord's j ail 
<he weight.^ of the bag are hk \voi k. 

Tlic highway of the upright is to depart from 
evil ; Ire that keepeth his way doth preserve his 
^ul. 

-LESSOX IV, 

The wicked man shutteth his eyes to devise 
froward things : moving his hps, he bringeih evilj 
Ao pass. 

The hoary head is a, crown of glory, if it be 
tfound in the way of goodness. 

He that is slow to anger, is better tlian the 
mighty : r.nd he that ruleth his spirit, than he 
^hat tak jih a city. 

LESSON V. ,f 

my soul, thou hast said unto the 0)rd, Thoa] 
^rt mv God, my goods ^re, nothing unto thee. 

All my delight is upon the saints that are in| 
the earth : and upon such as excel in virtue. 

1 will tbank the Lord for giving me warning;] 
xny reins also chasten me in the night season. 

I have set God always before me ; for he i&on| 
myipight liand, therefore I shall not fall. 

LESSOJi VI. 

The Lord is my shepherd ; therefore can Ij 
tack nothing. 

He shall feed me in a green pasture ; and leai 
rfft iorth beside the waters of eomforfc 



to THE ENOUSII TbNGL% 51. 

Thou shalt prepare a table before me, againA 
Uiem tliat trouble nie ; thou didst anoint nlV 
head with oil, and my cup shall be fuU.'- *; -^ 

But thy loving kindnes.s and' mercy shall fot-' 
low me all the days of my life : and i wlH'dwelh 
Ml the house of the* Lnrd fur ever. - 

WORDS OF TailEli: SYLLABLES, 

Note. The Accent u on the first Sjllahk 



j-i 



A^-so-hitc 

ab-str-nenGe 

ac-ti-on: 

ad-jec-tive 

ad-mi-ral , 

af-ter-ward^ 

^g-gre-gate 

aRder-man 

al-ma-nack 

al-pha-bet 

a"ni-mal 

a'^ni-mate 

an-nu-al 

ap-pe-tite 

ar-ti-choke 

aMi^fice 

a-the-ist 

Ba'^che-lor 

bar-ba-rou3 

ba"ro-net 

bat-tle-door 



bC've'^'iiiga 

IVjUter-iiess 

blarne-a-blc 

bIaf-phe.mou3 

plas-phe-my 

book-seller 

boun-te-Qus 

bro^ther-hood 

bu'^si-ly 

but-che'^ry' 

but-ter-flyv 

but-te-ry 

Cal-i-co 

can-di-date 

can-die-stick 

ca"ni'''ster 

ca-pa-ble 

ca^ra-way 

care-fnl-ness 
caFe-fess-ly 

r»nr_T\on fiai* 



beg.ga-ry car-ri-aife 

b€"ne.fit - 



car-n-er 



ca-te-chisin '' 

ca'^Uio.lic* 

cad^ti-Duji " 

cc'^'ki- brats 

cer-tain-ly 

cer-ti-fy 

chan-ce-ry 

change-a-ble 

charge-a-ble-' 

cha''fac-ter 

cha'^stise-meftt' 

cha''dti-ty 

cheer-ful-ly 

cheese-mon-ger 

cho^^co-late 

cho'^le-ric 

chri'^sten-ing, 

cin-na-mpii 

cir-cu-Iar 

cir-ciim-stance 

iTicaii-ii-iiesHI 

Tile^^'men-cy 
cJo-tlu-er / 



fCd'^merdy. 

con -monger 

tiontfiliijBnce 

con-fi-'dent 

Qon-ju-ror 

con-starucy 

con-tra-ry 

co^vet-ou3 

coun-seUor 

Gu-ra-cy 

cu-ri-ous 

cu''''stom-er 

Dan-ger-ou^ 

de''''so-iate 

de'^spe-rate, 
<J^ "sti-tiite • 

di-a-itioml 
(lig-ni-fy 

dif-fbr-ence 
dif-fer-erit 

dPJf-gent 
dPmi-ty 

di'^vi-d^nd 
dia-pe-ry 

drop, sir cal 

drQw<-si-noss 

dnink-en-n^ss 

dn-ra.blo 

diNti-ful 

Eat-a-ble 

c^Ie-gance 

e'^'^io-qiience 



A NEW GUIDE ^ 



em-bas*sy 

em-pq-ror 

e''iie-ray 

cn-mi-ty 

&'''pi-t^plv 

e-qua-lize 

e^^'ven-ingr 

e^^ve-iy 

e^vi-dent 

ex>cel'lcnt; 

ex-er-cise 

Fac-to-ry 

fa'^cul-ty 

faith-ful-lyr^ 

lal-si-ty 

fan-ci-fol 

fa-tlyer4€ss 

fa-voii-rite 

fcl.lovv-&bIp 

fif-ti-eth • 

fi-nal-iy 

fii^ma-ment 
fi^ili-e^ry ' 

fla-g(i'^let • 

iiuc-tu.ato 

foKlow-er 

)l-e-ry 

-cirble 
iV^'reign-er 
io^rest-er 
for iiHiltJy 



fool-e-r 
for-cirbie 



for-m€!r-ly ' 
for-ti-tude 
fo r-tii-nate 
frac-ti-on 
fre-quen cy 
fright-ful-Jy 
frPvo-lous 
fruit-er-eu . 
fu-ri-ous . 

fur-ther-more 

Gal-}ant-ry 

gal-lery 

ge^''ne-ral 

ge'*'iii-ting 

gen-tle-iiian 

g]a-zi-erV 

glo-ri-fy 

g,Io-ri-ous 

glut-ty^ny ' 

go^^ern-me»fe 

go'Ver-ness- 

go'^^ver-mor. 

grace-ful-Iy, 

gra-ci-oiis 

gra^'du-a! 

gra^'iia-ry 

grand-faUher 

grand-mo'^tiicr 

grate-ful-ly 

gra'Sirty 

e:ra-zi-er 

gree-dUy 

grid-i-roiv 



to TUB :EKOLrSH TOXGUE. 



grievrous-ly 

gCO-CQ-ry i^'.i. ) 

guar-di.an ** 
gua-ne-ry 
Half-pen-nv 

hand-ker-chief in-faii-cy 
Iiap-pi.ncss in-fer-encc 
Iiar-mo.?iy in-fi-dcl 

ju^'zard-oMs in.flu.eiice 
iicad.bo''rougIi iii-lioid-er 



in-di-go 
in-do-lent 
in-dii'^stry 
infa-iirotis 
in -ill my 



]iear*ii-ry 

/iea''v*cn-Iy 

hca'^ i-ness 

he'^raid-ry 

licrb^al-ist' 

iier-mit-age 

Jic'^si-tatc 

hi^'oto-iy' 

iii^'ther-inost 

'lior-ri-bly 

jlio si-civ 

ho''8pi-tal 

liousedmld-cr 
jJiu-mor-ist 

jiui-mor-oiis 

[Iiu-nrar-soaie 
Htr-ri cano 

Iias-bui^d-inaii 

^7''po-erite 

^i?-no-ralnee 

'ii-pi-oi^^. 

in. 



m-ju-ry 

ia-no-ccnce 
in-so-Ieiice 
in-stm-ment 
in-te-ger 
in-ti-mafo 
in-ward4y 
» i-\'o-ry 
Jca'lou-sy " 
jcs-sa-mine 
^ je\v-el-Icr 
jc/Vii-Iar 
joUi.ty 
jouiviial-ist 

jii-ni-pcr 

ju'^sti-fy 

Kins- wo'^man 

kna-ve-ry 

Land-la-dy 

iit^'ti-tudo . 

laud-a-bJe 

]a'Ven-dcr 



UHli- 



pu-tlentf lec-tur- 



er 



(r>j 



IIQQ. 



y 



It 



ga-cy 



le 



le'^gMj] 
le''tiiar-gy \, 
li-a-ble vi 'til 
K^^be-ral '^^:f 
li'ljer-ty 

likedf-hooci 

F'ta-ny 

K''tur-gy 

live-Ii-hood 



li 



1 V 



■e-iy ' 



*lot-tc-jy 
low-er-most 
lu-di-crous 
III- mi. nous 
lu-na-cy 

Mac-kcr-cl 

mag-ni-fy 
ma''j(js-ty 
iTiain-te-nance 

inan-ner-Jy 
nia^'i-goia 

marjoranx 

i«ar-ri-ago 

mar-tyr-doai 

mar-vci-ious 
ine'Mi.cii>e 

iJie''mo-ry 

uicr-ci-ful ' 



i 



m 



A NEW GUIDE-; 



' mi 



mcs-sen-ger. 
migh-ti-ly 
mil-lin-er 
mil-li-on 

mi^ra-cle 

nii''se-ry 

mis-sel-to 

mock-€-ry 

mo'^nu-ment 

move a-ble 

moun-te-baiik 

mul-her-ry 

mul-ti-tudq. 

Na-ti-on 

na'^tu-ral 

nec-ta-rine 

r.e'''ga-tive. 

neg-li-gerrce 

iiig-gardJy 

night-in-gale 

nine-ti-eth 

iiorth-er-ly 

Ho^'ta-bly 

iiou'^rish-ment 

nu-me-ral 

nun-ne-ry 

iiur«.se-ry~ 

Ob-li-gate 

ob'^sti-nate 

ob*vi-ate 



v»^-v-u 



-yj/ 



of-fer-ing. 



oi/f)e-ra ( 
o "pe-rate ' 
o-pi-um 
or-dei^-ly 
or-gan-ist : 
o'^ri-fice 

©r-iia-ment- 
o-ver4>oard 
out-er-fliost 
*Pa^'ra-ble : 
pa- rent-ago- 
part-ner-ship 
pas^sen-ger . 
pas-si-on , 
I>aJ?s-o-'Ver • 
pa^'stti-rage 
pa-ti-ent • 
pa-tri-^rch ' 
pen-dki-lum ' 
pen-si-oii . 
peri-odv 
per-qui-site . 
per-se*cate. 
pe'^^'sti-lent 
petti-coat 
pew-ter-er 
pi^^ge-on 
p.i.^-ty 
piMo-ry 
' pi^ti-iiil . 

plen-ti-iul > re f'si^dencQ 

re''si»du« 



por-ren-gerr 

poiil-ter-er - 

po"veF-ty 

pQW-er-ful ^ , 

pre^ci-ous - 

prc'*'stRt-ly / 

pro''''di-gal 

pro^Kpcr-ous * 

pro'^vi-denee 

p&Jm-o-dy 

publi-can 

pu^nish-ment 

Qua^'lKty 

qvian-ti-ty 

q«ar-rel-somo^. 

quar«ter-age - 

quar-ter-ly . 

que"sti-oa 

Ra-ri-ty 

rasp-ber-ry^ 

ra^'ti-fy 

reavdi-ly 

reC'koii-ing 

re^com-pencd 

re''cte-ate 

rec-to-ry 

re 'fer-eiice 

re"gi;"stry 

refguJarJ 

re"gu-late 

re''me-dy» 

^ •■•„ _ ^ ' ^ 



pic 



u-n-s'' 



!rO THE FNGLISH TONGlTfi. 



m 



i^''so-Jute 

re''ve-rence 

ihe/'to-ric 

xhifeu-ma-tism 

ri'^di-cule 

right-e-ous 

li/^go-ious ' 

rob-be^ry^: 

ri-ot-ous 

rose-ina-iy 

rot-teii-nes9 

ruf-fl-aiL 

xus-set-in 

Jita-CFa-ment 

saiic-ti-on 

sanc-ti-ty 

sa'aistfy 

scan-da-lous . 

scar-ci-ty 

sca'^ven-ger 

scru-pu-lous 
ee'^cond^ly 

se\ii-meiit : 

sen-si-ble 

seii-li-ment 

se^pa-rate 

se'^^pul-chre 

se-ri-ous 

set-tle-ment 

se^''ven-ty: 

i 

sin^'-gii-Iat , 
Six-ti-tth" ^ 



sil-ia-bu 



//. 



ske^'Je-ton 

sia-ve-iy 

slip-pe.ry 

so'^feiim4y 

soJ-di-ei' 

sc/li-tude 

sor-row-ful' 

so ^ve-Feiga; 

spec-tsi-cle 

stfew-aid-ship 

straw-beF-Fy 

stiiF-ge-oii 

sub-sti-tute 

sum-tU-ous ^ 

fiUF-ge-oti'V 

Tan-ta-h'ze • 
ta'^pe'^stry 

teach-a-ble ' 
te-di-ous 
te''le"scope> 
teHi-pe-Fate ^ 
tem-po-ral 
tcy-lie ment : 
teF-Fi-bie . 

te^'sta-ment ■' 
te''s.ti.fy 

thir-ti-eth 
tow^ard-Iy 
tFact-a-ble . 
tFa^ge-dy . 
tFa""ve4-ier 
tFoa'*'che-Fy 



trea'^su-Fy 

tFou'^ble-aome 

tFum-pet-er 

twen-ti-eth 

ty ''ran-ny- 

Va"li-ant 

va^tti-ty 

ve-Iie^H)en€6 * 

ve'^ni-soo ' 

ven-tUFe-some 

veF-bal-Iy; 

ve'^Fi-ty 

ver-si-oii ^ 

vic-to-ry 

vic-tu-als ' 

vKgi-Iant 

vi''gOF-OW8 » 

vFne-gar 

vi-o-Ierice 

vir-tn-ous ' 

v/sit-or- 

Uii-dcF-liand:^ 

un-der-iuost • 

u-ni-fbrm . 

use-ful-nei.s ■' 

utrier-ly 

Wag-g0H-cf 

v^'aF-Fi-or 

\vea-ri-ed 

wea-Fi-some 

wharf-in^ger 

wiGiv-ed-ness 

wil-deF-ness 

won-dcr-fijl 



0' 



^e 



^ iimv GUIDE 



^Soma €00^ Lessons on ih /oregomg TaMes, consisHn^ 6f \ 
JVords not exceeding Three Syllables, 

ivEJOICE in the Lord, O yQ righteous j for 'it 
uoth become well the just to be thankful. 

Priiise the Lord with a harp : sing praises untd 
iiim with the kite, and instruments often strings. 

Sing unto the Lord a new song : rjng praises 
lusnly unto him with a good courage. 

For the word of the Lord is true : . and all hia 
works are faithfuL^ 

LESi^oir xi; 

A virtiiOus woman is a crown to her husband- 
but she that hath no shame is as rotenness in his 
bones. .< 

The hand of the diligent shall bear rule : but 
tlie sioUiful shall be under tribute. 

The righteous is more excellent than his neio-h- 
bour : but Uic way of the widved- doth sedSce 

tilCIXl*- 

EESSON i\i: 
I will magnify thee. O God,, my King : and I 
will praise thy name for ever and ever. 

Every day will I give thanks unto thee : and 
praise thy name for iixcr and ever. 

Great is the Lord, and marvello-.^ ; worthy to 
be praised : there is no end of his greatness. 

liie Lord 13 loving unto every man : and hk 
mercy is over all his works. 

LisssaN IV. 
A king that sitteth in the throne of iudkment. 
scatjereth away all evil with his eves. J^'^^^^"^' 

iliere is gold and a multitude of rubies: but 



•the lips of 1^10 wkd 



^■p arc Si pjccious je^^^cl', 



to TffEE3^(?Ljiafi tongue; 



M9' 



Bread pf deceit is sweet td a man ; . but after- 
wards his moMth shall be; filledwithgi^v^h 

bay not thou, I wMl Fecpmpense r^vil i.but 
wait on the Lord, and Ijesfeall save titee.. • 

The Lord is righteous ill. (Ulliis ways, and ha. 
fy in all his works. . . " "« 

The Lard isnigh unto sU them that eM m 

i/^'^n //.?"?'' "-' call upon him faithfully. ■ 
He ^vill fulfil the dcshe oitheni that fear him t- 
lie also willjiear their cry, and will help them. 

hii K . .'^*'* J"^*^"^ all them that, love 
J»m ; but scattercth abroad all the wicked men.. 

• LESSON VI. 

The robbery of the wicked shall destroy then, : 
because thisy hate judgment. 

The: wakied shall be a naMom, for, the -riehte. 
ous: and he that doth tra««grcss, forthe uprighl 

A wsemaascaleth thecity of the imeUv Ind 
cas teth down the strength anLonfldence tK! 

hut thpngliteo^s giveth and spareth not. 

NotP Tj :. : TABLE JI. . . 

^ote. TAe Accent nf-thefitliMmg. IVorcl, i^ar, rJUucoBd 
A ist/Uable: , 

A. -bun-dance ap-])a-rent 
ac-com.plish ap pear-ance 



ad.mo'''insh 

ii-mend-mcnt 
un-o^'ther 
!a-po'^'stle 
ap-pa''fel 



ap-pen-dix 
ap.pren-tice 
arch-an ^'gel 

arcl»-lVi<'«hrkrw 
"""If 

as-sem-ble. 



at-tend-ance 
Be-got-tcijb 
be-liold-en 
blas-phe-mer 

com-inand-njent 
coiii - iii I t-t ce 

com-peu-sat^ 



sh 



^> , 



''/I 



4^ NfeW dtirr^ 



i'^ 



dorn-po-sure 

con-du-cive 

e6n-fine-nient 

con-jec-ture 

con-8i''der 

cotk-tent-mettt 

con-ti'/nue 

Con-vul-sive 

De-ceit-f 111 ^ 

diB-fi-ance> 

.de-Ii"ver 

<lfe-ttion-sti^afcfe^ 
di-liem-ma i 
di^mi^nish 
di-rect-ly 
di'*'sci*ple ' 
dii5-co-ver' 

dis-ii'^gure 

dis-grace.ful> 

dis-lio"nest - 

dis-or-der ^ 

dis-plea'^suFC' 

dis-sem-ble- 

dPstiUler' • 

dis-tin-giMsh 

dis-tri'/bute 

E^le'venth 

em-bas^sage > 

cm-bow-el 

uii-a-bie 

en-eoun-ter 

Gn-gage-ment 



en-joy*ment 

en-no-ble 

en-tai/gle 

e^sta'^'blisli 

ex-am*pl© 

eX'H^^lmne ' , 

ex-tin-guish ' 

Fan-ta^'^stic 

fore-nin-ner 

for-get-ful 

for-giv(j-ness 

for-sa-ken 

Here-a&ter 

he-ro-ic 

Ig-no-bte- 

iMe-gal 

ii-lu^strat6 

i^ma'^gine 

im-bit-ter 

im-«i</des€ ' 

ii^-mor-tal 

im-port-ant 

infi-pri"son 

rm-pro''per ' 

im-prbve-ment 

in-clo-sure 

in-cum-ber 

in-den-ture 

iti-hu-man 

in-JQ'^stice 

in-qui-ry,' 

iii-tlre-iy 

in-trea-ty 

in-vec-tive 



in-ve^nom \ 

Ma-je^stio . 

mis-ca^-ry ^ 

mis-fbr-tune^* 

mis-go'' vern 

mis-mVnage • 

nfis-sha-pett 

rnor€-o-ver 

Qb-ser-ver * 

ob-tru-der 

oc-(?ur-rence ' 

of-feud^r 

of-fen-sive ' 

op-po-ser 

op-pres-sor' 

Par-ta-ker 

pa-ter-tial J 

pa-the^tic ' 

per-fbrfti-ance 

pi^ma-tum 

pie-ffef-mcnt 

pro-duct-ive ' 

pro-hFbit 

pi-o-ject-or 

pro-phe'*'tic 

pur-su-ant 

lle-ceiv-er 

re-ei-tal 

re-cord-ar 

re-co^'ver 

re-dee m-er 

re*fiue-menj; 

re-fi-ner 

re-form -er 



J 



re-fresh ment 
re-ful-gent 
re gard less 
re meinrber 
re-mein.braBce 
remittance 
|, re pent ance 
re-sem ble 
Se ciire Jy 

I se diice-meut 






sur-vey-or un-daunlvedl 

-Survivor uneasy 

.Te''sta.tGr uneven 

te ''sta-trix Un-tneod ly 

thence for- wftfd un-godUy 



se vere-t 
sin cere -Jy 
spec ta- tor 
stu pen dous 

sub ,'r)is sive 
SLiu 8Cii ber 
suc-cess ful 
sue- cess or 
sur ren der 



» to-bac-GO 
to ge'^thpr 
tor-ment-^r 
itri-bii-nal 
/tri-um-phant 
;Vice-ge-rent 
"Un-ac-tive 
uiubo-soiu 
un-bro-ken 

un-cej>,tata 
un-ci^Vil 

un-co«n-xnon 
uacon stant 
un-co^v^er 



un-luc-k 
.4in-man-iy 



un-grateful 
^ uii-hand some, 
un-law-fui 

kv 

-ly 
un-plea''sant 
MJi-qui-^ 
un-sccm-Iy 
un.spot-te?l 
un-to-ward 
]iin-wel-con>e 
un-wilLirfg 
nn-wor-thy 
up.right-|y» 



Mor0 .^s^ , Lessons on the foregQing Tables,, coming .of 
Words not exceeding piree SyUables^ ' 

rp Lesson h 

A HOU, O ,Lord, hast maintained my I'-fght anji 

my cause ; thou art set it the throne that iudijest 
right . /J t5 . 

thou hast rebuked the heathen ; and destroy- 
ed the ungoldy : thou hast put out their name 
tor ever and ever. 

The Lord will also be a defence for the op. 






vii j^ i^iii^t: iii Uuvj-tinit; Ml viouuie. 



^:. 



i'i\)v}A^Nnw:(Smtn^ 



The ncli aM the ppof meet together-: the 
F^Lord 18 the m^eroflhtji^all. * ; 

A prudent man foreseiith the evil, and Iwdeth 
aiitmelf> but thQ simple, pass on and ^re punished. 

m th^t oppr^sseth the jwor to increase his 
.riches j. ^v>4 li<?; that giveth to the, rich, &l4i 
-surely icome to, want 

Rob not the poor, because he his poor : neither 
op press the. iUIii^ted in the gate. 

" 'LESSON III.' 

Whystaiidest thou sofar off, O Lord'; an3 
bidest ihy face in the needful time of trouble ? 

The ungodly lor ;his own iust doth persecute 
the poor : Id them betaken in the same craft 
that they ba'/e devised. 

For the ungodly fiath made boast ^ of his own 
heart's desire ; and speaketh good of the covetous, 
rwhoin God.abht)rreth. 

LESSON IV. 

Be not amongst wine-bibbers ^ amt)ngst rioti 
iOus eaters of flesh. 

For the drunkard; a^d the glutton shall come 
to poverty: : ai)d diowsiness skalj oover a man 
with iags. '^1 

The father of th« righteous shall greatly rev 
joiee : and ha tli^t b.dgettetl^ fa;. wise .child ^s^^ 
have joy of him* , ; 

LESSON V. / . 

^ Tte Iv^^vensr-eleckr^tlie glofy.^df iGod-^ land 
the. tirmmnenjt'shewetbhi^ handy-wort „ 

One day telleth anothei;, and oi>e night ioi 
Oertify another. 



TO THE ENGLISH TONODS, <!l 

ITiem is neither speech nor language, but 
tteit voices are heard among them. 

*».„•"" *?""•*" ?°"^ ^"* '"to ail lands: and 
their words unto the ends of the world, 

LESSON VI. 

The fear of the Lord is clean, and endureth 
forever; the judgments of the Lord are aK 
righteous and true. «ways 

More to be desired are Ihey than gold, yea. 
than much fine gold: sweete/also than hoS 
•and the honey-comb. ■" 

Moreover by them is thy servant taugki and 
in keeping of them there is great reward. 

... ' TABLE III 

Note. The AccM r^fm/olhrning W„rcU is on the IbA 

tiyilable* 



A^-ter-noon 
^p-pei-tain 
ap-pre-hend 
Ca"ra-van 

<Jom.pre-hend 

con-de-scend 

con-tra-dict 

l)is-a-gree 

dis-al-Jow 

dis-ap-pear 

dis-ap-point 

dis-ap-prove 

dis-be-lief 

dis-com-mend 



lfi!.r«/-\rM *^^ 



dis^e-steem 

dis-o-bey 

dis-o-bb'ge 

dis-pos-seSs 

dis-re-gard 

<iis-re-spect 

dia^u-nite 

do^mi-iieer 

E^ver-more 

Gre'/na-dicr 

Here-to-fore 

liere-up-on 

Im-por-tiin^ 

in-com-mode 



-l'S!---\^ 



v,-«i^p-u3u in-cor-rect 



dis-con-tent in 
dia-en 



in-dis'creet 

in-dis-pose 

in-so-mirdi 

in-ter-cede 

in-ter-fej*e 

rti-ter-leave 

jn-ter-line 

itt-teii-mix 

in-ter-nipt 

in-tro^duce 
Mis-ap-ply 

mis-be-have 
tnis^in-form 
O-ver-born 
o-ver-cast 



gage iri-di-rect 



cor-riipt o-ver-come 



o-ver- 



gi'OW 



63 



A KSW «I7IDE 



r 

d-ver-look 

o-ver-run 

0-ver4ttlie 

o-ver-thraw 

o-ver-turn 



re'^ph^mand 
fri'^'ga-doon 
Se'Ven-teen 
su-rper^ne 



Jle^^coni-tnend «u.per-scribe 
fe^Gon«<clLe There-a-bout 



iUn4>e-lief 

^n-deF*{nine 

im-der-stand 

Ye'^ster^ay 

ye^8ter-nigh* 



JtfbiT e<i«,y Ijessons on theforfgoing Wahtesy comiitSng df 
* Words not exceeding jThree SyUnhleSn 
^ . LEfiSOK I. 

X HE Lord look«th down from licaven upc 
the children of mai, to «ee if there ^eue^ny that] 
would understand and seek after God4 

But they are all; gone out of the way, they at 
iill become vile:: there is none that doth gooc 
no not one. ' 

Their throat is an open sepulchre^ with thej 
tongues they have deceived-: the poison ofasf 
U under tlieir lips. 

XVSSON II. 

By the blessing of the upright, the city is 
alted; but it is overthrown by the mouth oftl 

wicked^ 

Where no counsel is, the people fall ; butil 
the multitnde of counsellors, there is safety. | 

He that is surety for a stranger, shall smart fd 
k; but he that declineth to be a surety is surej 

The merciful man doth good to his own soi' 
but he that is cruel troubleth his own flesh. 

LESSON ni. 

O Lord, thou hast searched me out, andkno^ 
me; thou knowest my down-sitting, and 
up-rijipg; thou didst undarstand jny tboi 
kuug before. 



460t 
-lief 

:-stand 

)mUting of 



aven upc 

r, they ao 
loth good 

with thej 
jon of asii 



city is 
mth oftl 



90 THB Bll01.I9Ri TONGUE. 



m 



fj 



all; but 
safety, 
ill smart 
sty is sure 
own so 
flesk 

andlcno^ 
, aiiu liii 



Thou- art about my path^ and about my bed ; 
i«d spiest out all my ways. 

Try me, O God, andf seek the ground of my 
lleart ; prove me, and examine my thoughts. 

Look well if there be any way of wickedness 
in me ; and lead; me in.tlxe way of eterii4 life, 

LESSON. IV. 

It i» not goodC to accept the person of the wick* 
ed ; to overthrow the righteous in judgment. 

The heart of the prudent getteth knowledgi^ j 
and the ear of the wine seeketh knowledge. 

A man that hath friends must shew himself 
Viendly ; and there is* a friend that sticketh closer 
than a brother. 

Many mil entreat the favour of the prince; and 
every man is a.friend to him that giveth gills. 

LESSON V. 

Deliver nw;, O Lord, from the evil man, and 
preserve me from the wicked man. 

Who imagine mischief in their hearts ; and stit 
tip strife all the day long. 

They have sharpened their tongues like a ser- 
pent : adders* poison is under their lips*. 

Keep me, O Lord, from the hands of the un- 
godly ; preserve me fromvthe wicked men,, who 
arc purposed to overthrow my goings. 

, inBSflON VI.. 

The wisdom of the prudent is to understand his 
way ; but the folly of fools is deceit. 

The simple believeth every word ; but the pru? 
dent man looketh well to his going. ^ 

A wise «an leareth and departeth from evii| 
but the fool rageth, and is confident. 

The evil bow before the good ; and the wiefced 
at the gates.of the righteous* 



64 



A WEW «UID» 



A Ccept-a-ble djf^H-cul-ty 



WORDS OF FOUR SYLLABLES^ 

TABLE I. ' 

Not«« TA» w#cc«i^ wan M#/r«/ Syllable,. 

Na'^'vi-ga-tolil^ 

ne^ces-sa^ry 

nu-me-ra-ble 

Or-di-na-ry 

Pa'^Ja-ta-ble 

par-don-a-ble 

par-li-a-ment 

pas-si-on-ate 



diS'put-a-ble 

Ef-fi-ca-cy 

e^'le-gan-cy 

e'Tni-rien-cy 

ex-em-pla-ry 

ex-qui-sit€-ly 

For-mi-da-lMe 



Gen-tlG-wo*man pe^ne-tra-ble 
gil-li-flow-er p<in-si-on.er 



ac C63-sa-ry 

ac-cu-ra-cy 

ac*cu.rate-ly 

ad-mi-ra-ble 

ed-mi-ral-ty 

ad-ver-sa-ry 

a^k-ba^ster 

«»-mi^a-b]e 

a^mi-ca-ble 

am-nii-al-ly 

an-»werra-ble 

a''po-plex-y 

ap-plirca-ble 

Ca''ter-pil-lar 

ce^'re-monny 

cha'^ri-ta-ble 

eom-fort-a-ble 

com-ment-a-ry li^^te-ra-tur^ 

com-mon-altty lumi-ua-ry 

€om-pe-4ien-cy Ma^le-fac-tOB 

con-quer-a-ble iwa''^tri-nio-ny 

con-tro-ver-sy mea^''sur-a-ble 

eor-di-aUly me ''Jan-cho-Iy 

cour-te-ous-ly me*mo-ra»ble 

€0W-ard-li-ne6S mer-ce-iia-ry 

cre^dit-a-ble jnFser-a-ble 

crrti-cai-ly mo-ment-a-ry so'^ve-reign.ty 

ci/stom-a-ry niul-ti-pli-caiid spt/cu-la^tiv^ 

Pa^magxi-a-bk mul-ti-pli-er sta-ti-on-er. 



go'/vern-a-ble 

gra-ci'Ous-ly 

Ha^bit-a-ble 

ho'^nour-a-ble 

I ''ini-ta-ble 

im^pu-deiitJy 

in-ti-n^»cy 

La-inent-a*ble 



pe''H8h.%.ble 

per-se-cu-torv 

per-son-a-ble 

pin-cu^shi-oa 

prac-ti-ca-ble 

pre^fer-a-ble' 

pro''fit-a-bIe 

pro^'^'mis-so-ry; 

pro^se-cu-tor 

lloa*son-a-blQi 

re''pu-ta-ble 

Sancntu-a-nr 

sea-son-a-ble 
severe- ta-ry 
se'^pa-ra-bfe 
ser-vioe-a-bl9 
sc/li-ta-ry 



xff 



TO THE INOUSH TONGUE. 



6^ 



»ta^lu-a-ry 

sub4u-na-ry 

Tem-po-ra-iy 

ter-ri-to-ry 

te''Bti-mo-ny 



tran-si-to-ry 

Va'^'lii-a-ble 

va-ri-a-ble 

va-ri-ous-ly 

vi-o-la-ble 



vir-tu-al-ly 

vo'''lun-ta-ry 

Ut4er-a-ble 

War-rant-a-ble 

\vea''''ther.bea-ten 



Note, I7*# Accent of the follmmg Words is on the second 

Syllable, 

AB-8te-mi-ous a'^spa^'^'ra-gus com-pas-si-oii 
al).surd-i-ty as-ser-tion coh-clu-si-ou 

ac-cep4i-on a'^sto ''nish-ment coii-di "ti-on 
ac-com-mo-date a^'stro'lo-ger con-fess-i-on 
ac-com-pa-ny a '^stro "'mo-nier 



ac-count-a-ble 

ad-dFti-on 

ad-ven-fiiT-er 

^dver-si-ty 

af.fec-ti-on 

af-fi''jii.ty 

af-firm-a-tive 

af-flioti-oo 

a-gree-a-ble 

al-low-a-ble 

am-bi "ti-ou» 

a-na^^o-mist 

an-nii-i-ty 

aiT-ta''go-nist 

an-ti^qui-ty 

a-po'lo-gy 

a-po%o'Vic 



»t-trac-ti-on 

a-v^er-si-on 

au-da-ci»ons 

aiutho"ri-ty 

Bar-ba''''i:i-ty 

be-ne''VQ^lent 

Ca-Ia'^mi-ty 

cap-ti'^vi-ty 

car-na-ti-on 

chro-no''^lo-gy 

col-Jec-ti-on 

com-bu"feti-on 



con-lii-si-on 

con-ti'^nu-al 

con-tri^''bu-tor 

con-ve-nient 

con-vei'-si-on > 

con-vic-ti-on 

con-vul-si-on * 

cor-reC'ti-on 

cor-rup-ti -on 

ecu "ra-gc-ous 

cre-a-ti-on 

De-clen-si-on 

de-duc-ti-ou 



coin-mend-a-ble de-form-i-ty 
com-mi''se-rate de-li'^be-rate 
corm-mift-si-on de-li^ci-oq^ 
com-rtio-di-dXis tleJFvcr-ance 
com-mo '\li-ty de-plo-i a-ble 



ap-pren-tioe-shipcoin-mu-ni-cate de-sFra-ble 



it-niii-iiit;-LiC 



coiii-mu-ni-on ae-struc-ti-on 



JJS 'cen-si-on com-pa^^ni-oii dc-vo-ti-oa 

¥2 



e& 



A NEW GUmfe 



H 
I 



di-gesti'i-oo: 

cii-rec-ti-dii 

dis-cern-i-ble 

dis-co "ve-ry 

di8-tinc-tU4)U 

dis-trac-ti-on 

dl-vi^^ni-ty. 

do-mFni-oa 

doxTo''lo-gy. 

diirra-ti-on 

E-di^'ti-on 

cf-fecjt-u-ai 



fi'u-gal-i-ty 

fii-tu-ri-ty 

Ge-o'^gra-phy 

ge-o^'^'mc-try 

gra-tu-i-ty 

Ha''^bit-u-al; 

har-mo-ni-ous: 

hi^/sto-H-an 

hi"8towri-cal 

Im-man-i-ty 

hy'^po^cri-sy 

Irdol-a-tori 

i-dol-a-try 



eiiGou'rage mcnt il-iu'^'stri-ous 



e-nu-me-rate 

€r*ro-nc-ous. 

e-ter-ni-ty 

€-van-ge-list 

ex-ceptti-ou 

ex-cu-sa-ble 

ex-e"cu-tor? 

ex-e'*cu-trix 

eA-pe"ri-ment 

ex-pe-ri-ence 

ex-po^stu^late 

ex-pressri-on 

ex-tor- ti-on 

tx-traS^a-gant 

Pe-li"ci-ty 

fe-lo-ni-ons 









ira»me-di-ate 

im-meii-si-ty 

im-tnome-rate 

im-mo'^'^a-ble 

iui-pa-ti-ence 

im-pe^''rti-tent< 

im-pii^-ty 

im-press-i-on 

im-pu^ri-ty , ' 

in-ces-sant-Iy 

ih-cli-na-ble 

in-cve''''di-ble 

in-dii*S"tri-0U3 

in-fec-ti-on 

ill firm-i-ty 

iii-ge-ni-ous^ 



in-ter-pret-ei*i- 

in-ven-ti-on 

in-vin-ci-ble : 

in-vi''si-ble 

ir-re^gii-lar 

Liix-u-ri-antrt 

Ma-gi"ci-ant 

nia-jor-i-ty 

ma-li'^ei-ous 

me-lo-di-ous ; 

me-nio-ri-al 

ine-tho Mi-call 

nii-nor-i-ty 

mi-ra^''6u4ou», 

mo-ral-i-ty 

raor-tal-i-ty 

niy'''ste-ri-ouSv 

Na^ti^vi-ty 

ne^ces-si-ty 

no-bi''''ii-ty 

no-to-ri-ousv 

G-be-di-ent 

ob-jec-ti-oa 

ab-scii-ri-ty * 

ob-serv-a-ble^ 

ob-struc-ti-o»n 

Gc-ca.-si-on 

o-inis-si-ou: 

o-pe"ni-on 

op-press-i-ottt 






lC-V,ti'WiX6 



f\ n "tvi_Tl 



al 



for*nvaUi-ty in-he %i-tauce 
ibun-da-ti-on in-i^qui-ty 
:fia'tcv.niu-tv, in-stiuCrU-ou 



out-ra-ge-ou3 ; 

Par-ti''^<:iii-lat, 

pe-cLi-Uax. 



TO T»E lA^OLISS tONOUE. 



e^ 



l^r fee ti on 
per mis si on 
per pe^'tu al 
per sua si on. 
pe ti^'ti on 
plii lo'^so phy. 
phy '^i ci an 
plan ta ti on 
pos sess i on 
pes te^ri ty 
pre ca ri ous 
pre serv a tive 
pre sump tu ous 
pre va'Vi cate 
pro di"gi ous 
pro due ti.on 
pro fess i on^ 
pro mi'^sfcu ous 
pro phet i cal : 
pro por ti on; 
Re bel li an; 
re cep ti on ■ 
re co%e ry. 
re demp ti on 



re due ti on 
re flee ti on 
re la ti on 
re li"gi oua- 
1^ mai k a ble 
ri di'Acu loiis 
Sal va ti on-, 
sa tir i cal 
se cu ri ty) 
se ve'^fi ty 
sig ni'^ii cant 
sim pli^ei ty 
sin ce'^ri ty 
so ci e ty 
so hri e ty 
sub jee ti oa^ 
sub mis si on 
su per flu ous > 
su pe ri or> 
su per la tive* 
su'^pi'^ci ous 
Tfimpt a ti on 
to bac CO nist 
trans 4ieti on^ 



trans gress i ott. 
tu mul tu ous 
ty ran ni cal 
Vain glo ri ous 
va ri e ty 
vex a ti ous . 
vie to ri bus 
vir gin i ty 
vo lu mi nous ; 
U na"ni mous^i 
uftbla ma. ble r 
un ca pa ble 
un c.iange a bio. 
un du ti f ul 
im for tu nate - 
un man ner ly^ 
un mar ri ed . 
un raer ci fui^ 
umna tu ral 
uti sa vo ry^ 
\m search a. ble. 
un speak a. ble. 
un u su al 
uu wor.tbi ly. 



TABLE III J 

' Note,- TheAicentoftheJbllomng W6rd& h <m th6 thirdi 

Sellable, . 

^C ci dent al comunen tator dls a gree m«nt^ 
al to ge^'ther com pre hen sivedis com po sure 
a('na bap tism correspond encedis con tent ed . 

Be'^tie fao tor dis ad van tage dis in he"rit 
Ga/^^ii uian.ca disaffected li^^ver last in^, 



A NEW GUIDE 

Full da ment al Ma%ii fac ture su per vi sor 
In CO l^e rent me^^mo ran dum Un ac quaint ed 
in con sis tent mis de mean or un ad vi sed 
ki de pend ent mo"de ra tor un be com ing 
i:^ of fen sive 0"|)e ra tor un de ii led 
in stru ment al op por tune ly un der ta ker 
in ter ces sof o vei^ bur den un di vi ded 
in ter med die lle^^gw la tor u ni ver sal 
in ter mix ture Sa era ment al un pre pa red 
in tro due tive* se mi co Ion* un pro vi ded 
.Le gis la tive su per struc ture When so e'Vep 

^ Note. The Acce?it is on the last Syllable. 

A/'ni mad vert mis re pre sent 8u per a bound 
Le^'ger i^ main mis uti der stand su per in duce> 
Mis ap pre bend N^^er the less »u per in tend 

WORDS OF FIVE SYLLABLES. 

TABLE l7 

Kote. The Acceitt is on the Jirst Syllable 



A C ti on a ble 
Cir cu la to ly 
con sci on. a blie 
^u^'stom a ri \y 
Be"di ca to ry 
die ti on a ry 
Ex pi a to ry 
Fa'^Hhii on a ble 
fi^'gu rative ly 



Ju di ca to ry 
Mar ri age a ble 
Or di na ri ly 
Pas si on ate Jy 
pen si on a ry 
Que''^sti on a ble 
Sta ti on a ry 
sup pli ca to ry 
Vo"iun ta ri \y 



J 



TABLE II. 
Note. The Aiscent qfthefollamng r^ords is on tlie second 

oylluhle, 

Bo'Vini na ble 



-4- 

at tec ti on ate 

^p(i'''the ca ry 



Com 



me^'mo ra ble 



com mend a to 



com nus si on er 



^y 



€om-p 

€on-di 

con-si 

€on-ti^ 

De-ge 

de-li \ 

dis-ho' 

Ef-fe" 

c-pi'*'sc 

Pma"| 

J-ma'"^ 

im-rae 

im-pe'' 

iin-pra 

in-con 

in-cor- 

in-e^'st 

in-nu 1 

in-sa-ti 

in-se" 

in- to 

in-vi-o 

k-re'^g 






Note, 

Ak-s( 

ac-cepi 
ac-cla-: 
ac-cu-fi 
ad-mi-j 
ad-mo- 
ad*va» 



ro TH£.£NOLISH 'xOTSeVM, 



m 



juaint ed 
1 sed 
om ing 
led 
ta ker 
i ded 
' sal 
)a red 
tided 
> e'Vep 

I 

• m 

bound 
1 duce 
1 tend 

IS. 



J 



le second 
Y 



eom-pas-si-o-nate 

€on-di*ti-o.nal 

con-si ''dera-bler ^ 

con-ti^'nu-al-ly 

De-ge'''ne-rarcy 

de-li "ci-ous-ly 

«lis-ho^nor.-a-ble 

Ef-fe "mi-na-cj 

c-pi'*'sco-pa-cy 

Pma"gin-a-bie 

J-ma''''gi-na-iy 

im-me-di-ate-ly 

im-pe"ne-tra-ble 

iin-pracrti-ca-ble 

in-com-pa-ra-ble 

in-cor-ri-gi''1ble 

m-e^sti-ma-ble^ 

in-nu me-ra-ble 

in-sa-ti-a-ble 

in-se"pa-ra-ble 

in-to"je-ra-ble , 

in-vio-la-ble 

ir.re''gu.lju'.lj 



Ma4i«ci-ous-ly, 

Ko-to-ri-ous-ly 

Ob-serv-a-to-ry 

oc-ca-gi-on-al 

Pa'^rish-i-o-ner 

pre-pa'^ra-to-ry 

Re-co^ver-a-ble 

Tra-di'^ti-oii-al 

ty-ran-ni-cal-ly 

Vic-to-ri-ous-ly. 

Un-al-tei-a-ble 

unan-swer-a-ble 

un-cba'ri-ta-ble. 

un-con-quer-a-blq^ 

un-for-tu-nate-ly 

un-go"vern-a-bI^ 

un-ne"ces-sa-ry 

un-par-doma-ble. 

iin-rea-son-a-ble 

nn-right-e-ous-ly 

un-sea-son-a-bly 

un-suf-fer-a-ble 

un-ut-ter^-a-bl^ 



TABLR Iir* 

Note, The Avcejtt of the follotiipg Words is on tfi$-ihfpi^^ 

Sj/Uahle» 

Ab-solu-ti-OB' af-fect-a-ti-on 

ac-cept-a-ti^on af-firm-a-ti-oii 

ac-cla-ma-ti-ou ag-gra-va-ti-on 

ac-cu-sa-ti-on 



ad. 



mi-ra-ti-on 



ad-mo-nini-on 



ad< 



van-ta-ge-ous 



fit ^-istr-j/v «.i~Vi«i. 

^1-ter-a-ti-on 

am-mu-ni'^'ti-oix 

ap^pa-ri/ai-oftf- 



r^ 



^tfiW'dmwr 



i-pc/'sto^i-cai' 
ap-pli-ca-tUoii 
ap pre hen ai-on 
ap-pro-ba-ti on 
a-rith me'^ti cat 
ar-ti-fi'''ci-al 
a"vo-ca ti-onr 
Be^ne fac-ti-ott, 
Cal cu la ti on 
ca^te che"ti cal 
ce'*'ie bra ti-on 
ce'^^'re mo ni al 
chrFsti-an i ty 
cliro no \o^\ 
cir-cu-Ja ti»on 
cir cum ci'sionr 
com-mcnd-a-ti oH 
com-po-si ti-on 
com pre hen si on 
con demn a ti on 
con de seen si on. 
con firm a^ti on 
Con"gre ga ti on 
con sci en ti ous- 
eon &ter na ti on; 
con sti til ti on 
cOn sum ma ti ou; 
con tra die ti ovl 
con ver sa ti on 
cor po ra ti oa 
cru ci fix i on 
Pe cla ra ti on 
de cli na ti on 
^ef'mon stra ti on; 



de pri Va t! o%' 
de"so la ti on 
de test a ti oh- 
de vi a ti on. 
di"mi nu ti ott 
dis a gree a W& 
dis o be di ence* 
dis pu ta ti on 
dis tri bu ti on 
E"du ca ti on^ 
c van gd'li cal: 
ex a la ti on 
ex cla ma ti tyft 
ex com mu ni catft- 
ex pe di'^ti ous 
ex pli ca ti on 
ex port a ti on- 
Fal li bi''li ty 
fo ment a ti ort 
Ge ne a'lo gy 
ge"ne ra"li ty 
ge^'ne ra ti on 
ge o gra^phi cali 
ge o me^'tri cal 
Ha"bit a ti on 
ho^'spi tal i ty 
by po crit i caL 
Pmi ta ti on 
im ma te ri at 
im mo ral i ty 

im npr je>c* ti i\r^ 

im por tu ni ty 
im po si'^ti on, / 
im pre ca ti 0% 



TO TUS.XXSLXSH TONOtrfi. 



m 



ter- 



im ptopri e ty 
in car na ti c»fi 
in ci^'vi^li ty 
ill cli na ti on 
in con ceiv « ble 
in con si"de rate 
in con ve^ni enfc 
in cor rup ti om 
IP dig na ti on 
in e qual i ty 
in ex press i iAe 
in fi de"li ty 
in ge n« i ty 
in sig ni^ cant 
in spi ^a ti on 
in suf fi ci erit 
in sup port a ble 
in ter mis si on 
in ter ri^p 1i on 
in tro due ti oa 
in un da ti on 
invitation 
in vo ca ti on 
ir re li gi ous 
Jus ti a a ble 
La ment a ti oa 
li^'be ra'^li ty 
Ma'^tri mo ni al 
me di a ti on 
me'^'di ta ti on 
me^'ri to ri ous 
mi^^ni'^'ste ri al 
mi''ni"stra ti on 
Na'^vi ga ti on 



no^rai na ti oil 
•Ob li ga ti ou 
ob ser va ti o« 
o"pe ra ti on 
op por tu ni ty 
Pe^'ni ten ti al 
per pen di'<cu lar 
•per se cu ti on 
per 3pi j:^ ti on 
,phi lo so"phi cai 
po'^pu lar^'i ty 
pre"ju di-^i al ' 
.pre^pa ra ti on 
pre sen ta ti icm ' 
pre ser jva ti (Ml 
pr6"ba bi"li ty 
pro"cla ma ti o» 
pro'Ta na ti oa 
pro''po «i''ti OH 
pro^se cu ti on 
pro"vo «a ti on 
Re col lee ti o» 
/re^con ci la ble 
4re"cre a ti on 
re'^for ma ti oft 
.Te"gu la ti on 
re^'pre sen ta tive 
re'^pu ta ti on 
re^'sig na ti on 
re '•'so lu ti on 
re^spi ra ti o» 
re"sti tu ti oo 
re^'sur rec ti oa 
ru in a ti on 



7« 

•Sa'^lu tati ot 
^a//tis fac ti o« 
sen si bi**ii ty 
•sen su a li ty 
•su per na tu ral 
-811 per scrip ti oa 
ITi ans por ta ti on 



:^ KKtr CTDTDfi 



t^ns po 81*^11 0^ 
Va hi a ti on 
▼e"ne ra ti on 
vi o la ti en 
vi%i ta ti on 
Un ac count a ble 
u ni form i ty 



Koto. The Accent qfthefoUomng Words m en thejbur^ 

Sif liable. 



Ad ttii^i'^stra tor 
Cha rac ter i*stic 
-^o o'>pe ra tor 
De jio tm n-i tot 
Ee cle ^ist^'stie 



ex pe%i ment si 
Jm pro pri a tor 
Mul ti pli ca tor 
Su per. a bun dance 
XJn cir cum ci sed 



J>ROPER NAMES OF PERSONS, PLACES, Ac. 
OR WORDS USUALLY BEGINNING WITH A CAPITAIk 

"•Proper Names of One Syllable, 

j^NN. Bath,'Blith, Bourn, Bo we, Brent, Burgh. 
Calne, Cerne,. Chard, Charles, Christ, Clay, 
Coin, Cray, Czar. Deal, Disse, Dutch. Eve. 
fife, Mint, France, French. Grays, Guy. Hague, 
Ham, Holt, Hull, Hythe. James, Jane, ie% 
Joan, Job, John, Joyce, Jude. Kent. Leek, 
Lime, Lid, Lynn. Mark, March, May, Mere, 
Neath. Paul, Pool. Ralph, Rome.. Rye. Saul, 
Seth, Smith, Spain, Stone, Stroud, Throne, 
Trinpf, Troy, Turk, Tweed. Usk, Wales, Ware* 
-Welch, Wells, Wilts. York. 



TO THE ENGLISH TONGUE* 



7!? 



le 



tejintr^ 



tice 

4 



PITAl^ 



Burgh, 

:, Clay, 

I. Eve. 

Hague, 

, Mere, 
. Saul, 
Throne, 
;, Wares 



PROPER NAMES OF TWO SYLLABLES.- 



Note 

AA-toil 

A-bel 

Ac-ton 

A "dam 

Ag-britlge 

Ag-nes 

Al-ban 

Ales-harri 

Ale-ford 

A'^lice 

Alne-wiek 

Al-toil 

Am-brosei 

Ampt-hikl 

An-drew 

An-na 

An-trim 

An-twerp 

Ar-magb 



TABLE I. 

. The Accent is on the first Sytlabte, 

Au-stef JBerke-iey Brari^ham 
Au-stin Berk-shire Breck-nocfc 



Ax-bridg<* Ber-nard 

Ax-holiii Ber-ton 

Ax-mouth Ber-wick 

Bake-well Bet-ley 



Ba-la 

Bal-docJ 
Bal-tic 



Bewd-iey 

Bin-brook 

Bina:-ham 



Bamp-tora Bit-ford 
Ban -got 



j3rent-ford 

Brere-toii 

Bre-wood 

Brick-hili 

Bride-well 

Bridg-end 

Bridge north 

Bridg-port 



Bah-sted 

Bark-irig 

Bark-ley 

Bark-way 

Bar*nioie 

Bar-mote 



Black-burn Bri^slol 

Bland-ford Bri'^tair? 

Bol-toii Bri''-^tish 

Bo'^stou Bri'^ton 

Bo^^'sworth Brix-ton 



Bots-ham 
Boul-ness 



Ar-rarl 

Ar-thur 

Ash-ly 

Ash-bourn 

Ash-dale 

Ash-don 

Ash-ford 

Ash-krig 

Au-burne 

A u -gust 

Auk-land 



Barnes-ley Brack-ley 
Bar-net Brad-field 



Bar-ton 

Bast- wick 

Bat-lie 

Bau-trey 

Bay-nard 

Bec-kles 

Be-dal 

Bed-ford 

Bed- lam 

Bel-fovd 

Bent-ley \ 



Brad-fordi 



Brix-worth 

Brom-ley 

Broms-wick 

Brom-yard 

Brouffh-ton 



Brad-foith Bru-ton 

Brad-ing Bryn-ton 

Brad-ninch fiud-worth 

Brad-wel Bug-don 

Brain-try Bur-ford 

Bram-ber Burn-ham 

Bramp-ton Burn.ley 

Bram-yard fiarnt^wood 

Bran-don Bur-ton 

Bran-drith Bux-ton 



?4., 



A^NE«FX2tI'II>£- 






Byrfiwilx ^Gle'/meni Died*ham^ 

Cain-brjclge Cleve-lan^ Depp^ng 

Canip-de|i C!it;-tQil D^PrbigB 

Canes-bani ,Cob-li^m, Den-maik 

Car-dift* ' Cogge^slial jDen-nis 

Carl- ton Coles-iiill Den-ton 

Cart-iiiel Col./brd Dept-ford 

Ca^ston Colntbroqk Der-by 

Ca"stor Con-nout^htDere-bam 

Cath-ness Con-stance De-rick 

Con-waj Der-went • 
Cope-iand Dig-bj 
Cor-briiige; , Dock-in^ 
Cpr-by Dock-ley 

Corn - w^l Doxi^brook ^ Ere s-by 
Cow-bet Do-ver. Es-sex 
Cow-bridge , Down-bain rE]v€|§-hajQa 
Cran[i boiu^n Down-j oq , Eu-rope 
Crane broQk,Pray-toj;i Eu-stoa ^ 
Cra-ven , Dron-field Ew-el 

Cbejms-fordCraw-iey Dub-lin Ex-mouth 

Chel-sea Crepk-lade Dud-iey Eyre^s-tord 

Chep-stow Croynrief Dul-wicb Ey-ton 

C^herVsey Crock-horn Dun-chui:cHFair-ford. 

Clies-ham Crow-landi Dun-kirk Fair-leish 

Ch^''ster Croy-don Dun-mo:w Falk-land 



Ca-.wood 
Ciix-ton , 

Cax-woi4 

Cbag-fpr^ 

Cbag-ley 

Cbar-le/ 

Chat-h-iiii 

Chea-'ile 

Ch^ck ley 

Chelltbrd 



E-den 

Eelg-wai*e 
Edr\vard 

Ed-win . 
E-gypt 

Elt-hap^, 
E^ly 

En,fie14; 

En''gl^n4 
En''glisJ]i J 

En-ha^ , 

Ep-pin^, 

Ep-soni 

Ep-worth 



Cbes-hunt Crux-field 

Chew-tpn Cy-piess 

Cbid-ley Dal-toti 

Chi-na Dan-by 

Christ-mas Dar-king 

£~^l^ttA tr\trrV\ I loi'f TVM'/T 



Dims-field Fal-niputh, 
Duns-ford Far-han]i 
Farn.;.ham 
Fisn-guard 
Fleet-holi;Hi 



Dun-ster , 
Dun-wich 
Dur-iiam 

■ Viiir-olriTr 



Chuhn-leighDart-mouth JEa-ster Flush-ing , 
Cl^p-hain i)a-vld E|-to» ^oikes-tSijt 



TO THBT BNtilrMH TONGUE.. 



m 



Pords-ham Hamp-ton 

Fo'^ston H^amp-st^d 

Fouls-ham Han4ey 

Framp-ta!i UiMV-inere 

Fri-day Han-nab 

Frods-ham Uaiit-i^ife 

Gan-ges Hapi-ping 

(nieni-sey Hai-leigh 

Gaith-It>y Ilarks-ton 



Hitch-iu liend-worth. 
Mk>ddes*46D Ke-'iielm 
HoU^>«cli Ken«forJ 



Gay-ton 
Ge'^rard 
Gi-lion 
Gis-born 



fclar-lo\y 
Harn-den 
Har row 
Hart-land 



Httm-iber 

Hol-liMid 

Hornwby 

Horn-don 

Horu!-sey 

Hor^liam 

Hor*ton 

How^den 

Hox-ton 



Ken-net i 
Kci"«.ry 

Kofr'holm 

Key«-w(>rth 

KiKburn 

KilH:ki« 

KiUliam 1 

Kine^ton 



Glam-ford H^r-wich 
Glas-g)w Ha-stings 
God-frey Hat-field 
Goud-h«rst Ha-vant 
Graf-ton Hayls-ham 
Gram-pond Hea'Ven 
Grant-ham Helmes-ly 
Graves-end Hemp-sted 
Green-wich Hen-don 
Grimsby Hen-ly 
Grin-stead He'Vod 
Guild-hall Hert-foi^ 
Guild-ford Hex-ham 
Gui%ea Hey-don 
Hack-ney Hey-wood 
Had4e^h Hick-ling 
Hale-don High^gate 
Hales-woirth Him-ley 
Hal-ling Hinck-ley 
l^al-sted Hin-don 
HaHi-bu^]gh Hing-h»m 



Hum*phtey Kiugs-cledi' 



Hunt-ly 

Hu-^'stings 

Hut-ton 

Ich-woith 

I-la 

Ip»-wich 

Ire-knd 

Ir-ton 

I-sa4c 

Isle-worth 

Ix-w<>rth 

Ja*eob 

Jer-sey 

Jer-by 

Je-sus 

Jo-»as 

Jo«^eph 

Ju»das 

J«jhdith 

KeilPip-ton 



Ki^gs^land 

King-stem 

Kin»i^e 

Kirk-haia 

Kii^c-ton 

Kirk'Wall 

Kiriton 

Knap-daili^ 

Kre«<kirth 

Kyne-taii 

La^holm 

Lam-bert 

LaiiMboriie 

Lam-beth 

Lamb-ton 

Lan^dafif 

Lang-ley 

Liay-ton 

Lance-lot 

Land^ravQ 

Lame-Hoy 



76 



4 NEW GUIDE 



If) 



I',' 



\ i 



■^ 



Lang-port Mai- vein Na-ples 
Lang^worth Mans-field Nar-barth 
Lau-renc© Mufe.?-^ield Nase-by 
Lay.stoff ' Maj 'low Need-ham 



Led-wel 

Leigh-ton 

Lcin-ster 

Lemming 

Lem^ster 

Len^ham 

J^e^nox '^i 

Leo^'^'nard 

Leo^'pold 



Marsh-field Ne'^ton 



Mar-thii 
Ma-rv 
Mas^ham 
Mat-thcw 
Med- way 



Ne'Vern 
Ne "via 
iMew-gate 
New-ark 
New-bridge 



Mer-sey 
Mer-ton 



Letch-lade Mid-hurst 

Le-vite ' Mi'lan 

Ley-den Mil-brook 

Litch-field Mil.dred 



Lid-fbrtl 

Li-bourn 

Lin-col n 

Lind-sey 

Lin-ton 

Lis-bon 



Melks-hana New-ent 
New«in 
New-land 
Newn-ham 
New-port 
New-ton 
Ney-land 
Nor-folk 
Nor-mal 
Nor-throi^- 
North-wich 



Mile-ham 

Mil-him 

Mil-thorp- 

Mil-ton „ 

Mine-head Nor-ton 

Mon-day Nor-way 

Long-ford Monk-ton- Nor-wich 

Long-land Mon-mouth Nut-ley 

Long-town Mont-fort Oak-ham 



Lon-don 

Lud-gate 

Lud-low 

Lii-ton 

Lyd-ford 

Maid-stone ^x^-t^ 

Mal-den Mun-slow Or-l©. 
Mai 



Mor-ley 
Mor^peth 
Mo-ses 
Moul-ton 



Ot-ley 
Ock-ley 
Of- frown 
On-ffar 



Mul-grave Or4ord 

Mun-ster Ork-ney 

Mun-slow Or-l©. 

pas Mur.ray Or-lop^ 



Orl-ton 

Orms-kirk 

Or-mus 

Or-mond 

Or-ton 

Or-wel 

Ot-ford 

Oun-ley 

Oun-dle 

Ow-en 

Ox-ford 

Pad-stow 

Pan-eras 

Pa 'Vis 

I^m-bridge 

Penq-broke 

Pen-rise 

Pen^ritlV 

Pen-ryii 

Pe-ter 

Pet- worth- 
Ph?'iip 

Ply'^outh 

PJymp-tom 

Po-land 

Pont-pooi 

Port-land; 

Ports^moLitl) 

Pot-ten 

Poul-ton 

Pre'^scot 

Pre'^ston- 

Ra-chel 

^ad-i^Qr 



TO THE ENGLISH TOKGUfi. 



7r 



Ram-sey 

Kains-gate 

lian-dal 

liay-lejgh 

Rea'Vling 

Re*-for(i 

Rope-ham 

ilicli-montl 

Riiig-wc 1 

Rip -ley 

Rip-j)oti 

llo "uert 

Roch-dale 

Ro^'ger 

Rotli-wel 

Row-land ■ 

Roy*3tc)n 

Rug-by 

Rum-ford 

Rum-ney 

Riim-sey 

Ru-then 

Riit-land 

Rye-gate 

iSampson 

Salt-Ueet 

Saiul-wich 

Sand-ham. 

Sa^voy 

Sax-on 



I Sc.irs-dalo 



Se'Vern 
Shad-well 
Shan-non 
Sheei-ness 
Slief.field 
Shef-ibrd 
Slief-nal 
Shep-hum 
Shep.pey 
Shop -way 
Slier-ston 
Shet-laud 
Ship-ton 
Shir-burn 
Shore-torn 
• Shrop-shire 
Sid-land 
Sid-mouth 
Si-mon 
Skip-ton 
Slea-ford 
Smyr-na 
Snets-haitl 
So'^dom 
So-dare 
Sjuth-am 
Soutli-atatc 
South-wark 
South- we 1 
South -wold 



Stafford Tlio^mad 

Stam-fbrd Tlirap-storr 

Stan-don Thurs-day 

Stan-hoj)e Ti-ber 

Stan-stead tick-hill 

Stan-ton Tides-wall 

Ste-ning Tin-head 

Ste-phen Tin-mouth 

Stil-ton IVow-bridg^ 

Stock-port T 



ru-ro 



Stock-ton Tues-day 

Stokes-ly Tini-bridgd 
Stoiic-hengeTur-key 

Strat-ford Tux-fbrd 

Strat-ton Vin-cent 

Stret-hani Ul-ster 

* Stur-bridge Up-sal 

Siif-foik Up-ton 

'Sur-ry Ux-bridjfre 

Sus-sex Wake-field 

Sut-ton Wal-den 

Nwafflham WaKsall - 

8wan-8ey Wals-ham 

SvVe-den Wal-ter 

Swin-don Walt-ham 

Swit-zer Wanff-ibrd 



ri^ 



am-worth Wan- 



Tar- 



tage 



nng Wap-ping 
lar-tar War-liam 
Taun-ton War-wick 



"p^^ 



t;j=i i\ 



t-nr 



Scot-land Spa^'riish Thax-ted 
Sel-by Spils-by ^rha-net Wat 

J3rct-tie ~ 



Wat-fbrcl 
toil 



Spit-head Thet-ford Web-lev 



I 



^2 



I 



Welch-pool 
Weu-lock 

We ''strain 

'Wex-ford 

Wey-mouth 

Whit-hy 

, Wliit cluircl 

Wick.liif 



A KipW GUI9E 



Wick-hajtn 
Wick-ware 
Wi ''gaji 
Wig-^ton 
Wi^-inore 
Wil.ley 
Wil-ton 
iWilt-sihire 
Wind-ham 



Wind.sor Work-sop' 
Win-slow VVre^^^liam^ 
Wirka. wpr th Wro 'thani 
Wis-beach Yar-mouth 
Whit-ney Ya-runi 
Wo-bourn Yax-ley 
Wol-ler Yeo-vil 
AVood-stock York.shir^- 
Wool-wich Ze"nith 



Note. TAe 



JX' 



TABLE II. 

Accent of the foUotvino; Words is on ihela^ 
f^yllahte 



■men 
Ar-^yle 
Bel-grade 
Ben-gal 
Canvrbray 
Car-lisle 
; Ca''''stile 
X>unr.bar 
DuuTblane 



Dun^lee Le-on 
Dum-fries Le-vant 



E-squire 
..Gui-et^oe 
Ho j -stein 
Ja"pan : 
Ju-ly 



liOr-raine 

Ma-drid 

;Mon-teith 

Mo-gul 

Mourtro^ 



Land-skrpon Na- ni ur 
Xa^pn Na-vari« 



0-range 

Q-Btend 

Pall-mall 

Pen-guin 

Pen-zance: 

Se-vilje 

Stock-holjitt. 

Tan.-gier 

Vlerrsailiiqa 



PIJQFBll N^MJESoF THREE SYLLABLE* 

TABLE L 

Note, pe Accent of the following Words is on ifief^ 

Si^llable*^ 



I 



j^^i-gail 

A''''bing4on 

A-bra-ha^ 

A'^fri-ca 



Ald^bo^ough 
Al-den-bur^h 
AUder-stoke 

Al A -- 

-x^i=4i*ci -ii.iJy 
Al.fre-tol^ 
A'^ii-caiit 



Al-ka-net^ 
Al-tringwh?mi 

Am-ber-ley 
/ini-DU-iy 
A'''ifners-ha!^ 
A^mer-toa 



VO THE 'ENGLISH > TONCUBi 



•jWit* 



An-ca^^'stcr 

An-do-ver 

An-gJe-sea 

An-tljo-iiy 

An-ti. Christ 

An-ti-och 

Ap-ple-by 

Ap.ple-dojte* 

Ar-Iing^tpn 

A^'run-daie 

A'si-a 

As-sin-shire 

A"thers-ton. 

At-tle-bri'dge 

Aul-ce^$ter 

Au-sterj-field 

Aii-stri-a 

Ax min-ster 

Ayles-bu^ly 

Ba^d^n-och 
lian-bu^ry 
Bar-iia^bas , 
Barji-sUnble 
Bay^bo"i:ougb 

Bea^^'conshfleliJ 

Beck-ing-hara 

Be^^dirfbid 

Beel^ze-jbub 

Bel-tipg-liam 

Ik-mi^ster 

Berjt-ham^tqd 



Bi.ce^ster Chi"che*'8tcr 

Big''gles.wade (hi diug-fbld 



Bii-dcslpii 
BiUJing-iurd. 
IVil ling ham 

Bil-Iingvhurst 

Bil-iirjgs gale 

Bii-iiiiiig,ham 

Bol«so-vcr 

Bo'-Ucn ham. 

Bos-bu'^iy 

Bra-ken-hiil 

Bra sing-tan 

BridgAv;a.ter 

Bridding-ton 



ChiUbng-ljum 
C1ijp,pen-l>am 
Choi nK)iid-i(?y 
Chri/^sten domj 
Ghri//sti an 
Chri^Aitopher 
Chry/Aso"stona; 
Cla'^ren do^. 
Cliche roe 
Cock er moutih^ 
Col.che''ster 
CoIfiii.ig.hai»> 
ComberjLQUj 



BrightheJmstoneCon gleton 
Bro-k^n. h lu-pt Co ''nirig ton • 
Buck ing-iijani Co''iii''ston 
Buldinig.b.rpp|t Con stan tinii' 
Bun-ting49i;d Cor jdp :va» 
Bur-row^bridge Cor si c^ 



ByJber-i^ 

Ca,^/ineJ4brd 

Qain-dkr^i^s 

Caii^i cles 

Car4)u'^y 

Car^iygan- 

CaL-hainp-.to^ 

Car ling4brd 

Ca"tliarrine 

Che'^l^jr^g ton 

Chei4^n.iiai^i 

Gh^ri-bu/^ry 



Go'Ven try' 
Grre^di tom 

^roc^erliiUT 
GuiJit^n; 
Qum ber fend? 
JKun'^ndng liaqft:* 
Da'^ni.d 

Dar Jiipg ton 
l>venjt?y 
De''i?en ha.i» 
Xle^'l^p iiiab 
Deddingti^fl 



''*0 



A NEW CLTjofe 






I 

Vi 

iHlii 



i ill I 



Oa^^'Von-sliirc rbrd-ing-britlge lliir>ga ry 
Dt*vvs-bo''roiig]i Frani-ling-ham Hiin'^ei' fofcl 



Did- 



mer»ton Fre^Ale-ric 



Hunt iiiii'bdon 



l)i"sting.toii Pres-sing.field IJ che'^ster 

DoTi-ca'^ster l-rod-ling-Jiam 1] min^\ster 

Dor-ch^'^stcr Fronie-hel-wood In di an 

J)or*la^'sU)M Ga-briel Is-iioff tori' 



Di 



o"iO'Ur\ 



^y 



I)or-Mc(-sliirc Gal-1 



Gains-bo 'roiigli Is-ra el 



o-v. 



Dill. 



■ve'r-ton 



(: 



■^y 



IJun-bar-ton 
Dan- 






ny 



Vtu4y 



U'ar-von 



( 



xei-ma 



"y 



//v 
Jef to ry 
Jc'^ii-cho 



jn<go 
ry 



Dun-ning-ton Gis-bo-rough Jc 
Dun-sta-ble Gloii.ce''^ster Jo^hva th 



e^'su-it 



Ea-sinff-wold 



Got:. 



atk 



tiiNjicn 



Jo^'sh 



Ec-cle-shall Gre/go-ry Kel 1 



u a 



Ec-cle-ton 



I grave 



E/Zdin-burgh Hai-li^fa 



H a ''ger-ston K el-lin'r.ton 



E 



gre-mont f lal-la-ton 



\'er»shot 
•e-ter 



IL 



Ken-che-ster 
Ke"nel-woith 



i''mer ton Ke 



Ha-milton 
Ex-o-dus Han-o-ver 

Ea-ken-ham Har-bo^ 



n-sino;-ton 



Ket*te;r-in2: 
Kir 



te 



nimg-ion 



-, , , ^ , I'oiJgH Knares-bo-^rougli 

i^al-ken-burgh Har-ring ton La-den-burgh 

larn-bo 'Yoiigh Ha-sle-mere Lan-bi^ster 

Ear.iiiig.don Ha sling den Lan-ca''ster 

Fer-mnig-ham Ha^ther-ly Lan-ca-shire 

Eer-iy-bridge Ha''^'(;r-ford I 

Eer-ry-Ivill Ha^''ve ril 



<an-go-ver 
La ven-bam 



Ee-vers-ham Ha^vering La'Ving.ton 

Eins-bu^/ry He^ro ford Led-bu\v 



Eiam-bo ^'r ougb His ''bo. 



o"ri. 



El 



rough Lei ce^'ster 
Hol-den-by Lemming ton 



ii}n 



Le 



o' iiim-ster 



Ta THE ENGLISH TONGUE* 



Si 



Li*ver-pool 

Lcw-b()'*'rough 

Luck-ing-ton 

Lat-ter-worth 

Ly^di-a 

Mac-des-fielcl 

Mag-da-len 

Ma-ho/'inet 

Ma'^'la-ga 

Malms-bu'''iy 

Man-che ''ster 

Man-ning»tree 

Mar-ga-ret 

Marl-bo'/i-Ough 

Mar-ma-duke 

Ma-ry-land 

Men-dies-ham 

Mex-i-co 

Mi-cha-el 

Mic-kle.toa 

Mid-dle-bui'gh 

Mid-dle-sex 

Mid-die- ham 

Mid-dJe-ton 

Mid-dle-wich 

Mid-sum-mer 

Mo(Ubu"ry 

Mu^'sco-vy 

Ne"tlier-land5 

New-bu^/ry 

New-en-den 

Ni'^cho-las 

Nor-man-dy 

Not-ting-ham 



Ock-ing-ham 

O-di-ham 

0''''H-vfir 

Om-bers-ley 

O-ver-ton 

0"ving-ham 

Pad-ding-ton 

Pe"teis-field 

Pe^/ther-ton 

Pick-er-ing 

Pock-lii^-ton 

Por-tu-gal 

Prus-si-a 

Puck-er-idg« 



Shrews-bu'^'r^?^ * 

8[^me-on 

Sit-ting-bonnj 

Sit-ting-ham 

So'^'lo-nioii 

So'^mer-set 

So''nier-ton 

Spa"ni-ard 

Ste-ven- edge 

8trath-na-veru 

8tur-min-ster 

Sud-bu''^ry 

Sud-min-ste^ 



Queen-bo''^roughSun-der-land 
lla-ven-glass Su'^ther-land 
llen-dles-ham Swit-zer-kind 
Rick man s worth Sy ''ri-a 

Ta^'bi-tha 
Tad-ca^'ster 
Tan»ger-mund» 
Ten-bu'>ry *' 
Ten-ter-den 
Tewks-bu"ry 
Thong-ca^^'stor 
Thorn-bu'^jy 
Tii-bu"ry 
Ti-mo-thy 



Ris-bo^rough 

Ro^'^'che^ster 

Rock-ing-ham 

Ro''' scorn -mon 

Rot-t^r-dam 

Ro''^ther-ham 

Ro''ther.hith€ 

Rus-si-a 

Sa^'mu-el 

Sa%ir-day 



Scar-bo^rougli^ Ti^'ver-ton 
Sed-bu^'rv Towing-ton; 



Se'Aa-phini 

Se'^ther-ton 
Se/ven-oak 

Shafls-bu''''ij 



Tow-ce"ster 
Tri''''ni-ty 

TnrJ.V. 



1 1 'V\r 



Tudr-ding-|;|^ 



i;! 



5!«l' 



Tu^fscarny 
Va^'len tine 
UI ver ston 
Uppingham 
Wai \i^gfovd 
Wal sixij^ Jiam 
WalUihifmstaw 
War mm ster 
War ring tan 
Wa ter, tbril' 



Warlkigtow 

Wellington 
Wen do ver 
West bu''{ry 
West na in ster 
Wost.m6f;l4uad 
We^-'tlier |)y 

Whitsla*lc 
Wliitsimday 



Wriitsanti4e 
William 
Wimbledon 
Win caim toa 
Wiu chel s«a 
Win che^tex- 
Wov ce "ster 
Za^^'bii Ion 



^na ly 
Zo di axj 



iff. 



TABJ-E.ir. 
Note. MeJbeeat ofikeJoUmi>mgjnrdsmmihes«cwidi 



An ti^gbKi 
Arch an^I 
Au gil^^kin 
Au ^\P%i^^ 
Bahama 
Bar ba d^^es 
Berma d^s 
Bis sex tile 
Canada 
Canary 
Car mar theft 
Car nar von 



Cyrene 
I>a' ma'^cus; 
Da ri us 
De cerrr her 
l)e vi zes 
Brogheda 
Dungan non 
I)u razzo 
Di a na 
E dip tic 
E 11 as 
E qua tor 
Ew phrate§ 



Church Stret to^i Faler nus^ 
Co lump ton Ferrara 
Comb Mar tin X^o ren za 
Cremona Formosa 

Crick bow el Ge ''ne va 



Gi^raltat 
Go li ah 
Go mm' rah 
Gra na da 

Ho san na 
Ho^ea 
Ja mai ca 
Je ho \Ti{j^^ 
Jo si all 
Ju de a 
La doga 
Lan be d^ 
Le pan to 
Li pa ri 
Ma CO CO 
Ma dei ra 



TO THB BXULTSH-TONeDB. 



'oHP"^ 



[Matthia» 
iMes si ah^ 

Mo de na 
J Mo roc CO 
pew ca''^stle 
[New hs^ ven 
INew mar.ket 
iNorth aiHip ton 
iNorth cur ry 
iNo veijn bejT 
jOc to ber 

lOkehaqjp ton 
iPalfcTn^p. 



Phi le moir 
Phil lip pi 
Fort royal 
Pri^scilla 
Pill heJy 
Ha ven na 
Re be%ali 
Salerno 
Saio na 
Sa rep ta . 
^ vo na 
Sep tern bejr 
Sophifti; 
South arftp ton 



Vote, The 

_^er deen 
|A1 be marJe 

m ster dam 
A*nan dale 
Ba sing stoke 
Bo^n in gale 

Bud des dale 
'a^'ra van 



TABi^E in. 

Accent ofthe/oll&tuing 
Sj/Uable. 

Ca^'id stadt 
Char le ville 
(ihar le roj 
Ea ston ness 
El s>i neur 
Fonte nell« 
Har tie poole 
In vej ness 



3u ma tr» 
Su san na 
^^y\ venter 
Ta ran to 
TertuUus 
Tix con nei 
To bi ae 
To le doi 
Ve ro na 
Vi en na 
Vol ca no 
West che^sta? 
White ha i^ea 
Zaccheui 

Wordi U OH she last 

Xan giie doc 
Mil den hall 
Mount se rat 
Mount i!Qr rel 
Na^'za rene 
Os we%tree 
Pam pe lune 
Scan de rooa 



'ROPER NAMES OF FOUR SYLLABJ.ES. 

TABLE I. 

J^ote. The Accent of the following Wards is on,tlue first 

Syllable. 

dderbu^ry Am bres bu'''^ry Da^risbu'^ry 
lex an der At tie bo^rough W%ru a ry 
^mondbu^ry Can twrbu^^i:^ Fo-^thef ing «^' 



S4 



A NEW OUIDE 



l-P 



k 



i> ' 



Gla^stoti bu^'^'ry Ja^'ni za ry Mi cha el mas 
Hi e rar chy Ja ''nii a ry Pe ter bo'^rougli 

Is ra el i te Kid d er rain ster Sa^lis b u ^'ry 

TABLE 11. 

Note. T/i€ Accent qfthejhllomng Words is on the second 

Sellable* 



Egypt! en 
Eli"zabeth 
Epi''''phany 
E sa i as 
Eu ro pe aa 
E ze ki al 



A "cha i a 

A lue H a 

A me^'ri ca 

A po'^cry pha 

A ra hi a 

Ar me ni a 

As phal ti des Ga'^la ti a 

As sy^ri a Ga^li ci a 

Bar ba di an Gal li^^'po li 

Bar ba ri an Ga ma li el 

Bar tlio^lo mew (je or gi a 

Bil le ^'ri ca Ho ra ti o 

Bi tliy'^ni ca Ig na ti u& 



Bo he mi a 
Caffre^ri a 
Ca'^'la bri a 
Ca per na lun 
Ce sa re a 
Ce li^''ci a 
Co los si ans 
Coper ni cusi 
Co rin thi an 
Cor ne li lis 
Dal ma ti a 



I ta''4i an 
Je ru sa iem 
Le vi'^'^ti cus 



Na tba^^ni el 
Ki lo^'^me ter 
Korlliallertoa 
Pa la^'ti nate 
Pam phy^'li a 
Pe ne^iope 
Pia cen ti a 
iSa ma ri a 
^a ma'^ri tan 
Sar di ^'ni a 
Scla vo ni a 
Se ba^'sti an 
Si le si a 
Tar ta ri an 
The o^^do lit© 
TheC^pbilus 



rt^ 



Lien te/>nan cy Ther mo"me tei» 

Ma ho^''me tan Tbe& sa li a 

M i ran du la Ti be ri us 

Mol da vi a Ve ne ti an 

Mont go''%e ry Ve sti vi us 

Mont pe li er Vir gi'^ni a 

Mo ra vi a V tox e ter 

Mo sa i call West pha li » 



TO rFfl^ ms^um T0NGU13. 
TA»LE III. 



43 



A''''na-ni-as 

Ba-al-ze-bub 

Bar-ce-lona^ 

Be^ne-dic-tine 

Bc^ne-ven-to 

Cag-]i-a-ra 

Ca'^ro-U-na 



Note. The Accent ofihefoUmiu^ Wordi'h <m Hieilkiri 

Syllable, 

A-bercdn-way Dal-m^-nu-tha NFco-de-mus 
A^;;na-bap.ti^t E-le-xi-zei- O-ba-di-ah 

E^ze-ki-as 

Hal.i^.lu.jah 

Hen-ri-et-ta 

He^ze-ki-ah 

Fza.bel.::i 

Je^re*rai.ah 

Je'^ro-lio-aoi 
€he-tel.hamp.tonLa-za-ret.to ..„-......,,,,., 

Cnip.ping-On^garMaMe.ga'^scar Wot-ton Bas-sef 
C-ren-c^ster Mar^a-ri-ta ^/^'ehe-ri-ah 
Com.po-st«l.a Ne-be-mi-ah Ze*^de-ki-afe 

Note, ri;'he A£cettt is on the last Si^Uable, 

Bar-ceJo-nette Oivle-a-nais PJ^riip-pe-viHe 
PROPER NAMES OF FIVE SYLLABLES. 

TABLE L 

Note, The Accent ofthefdtomng Words is on the third 

Sellable. 



Pa^le^^'sti-na 
PhKlips-Nor-toa 
Sa^Ja-man-ca 
Sa-ra-go8-sa 

^Shep-ton-Mal-let 
Sut-ton-Col-field 
Thy-a-ti-ra 
Tra-co-ni-tns 



A'^na-to-li-a 
An-da;4u^si-a ' 
A-pol-lo-ni-a 
Cap-pa-do-ci-a 
Ca''''ta-io-ni-a 



H 



Ce'^plM^lo-ni-a 

Cle- burgT M or- ti^er 

Deu-terro'^iio-iiiy 

Di-o-ny^si-us 

E-qui^woc-ti-at 

E-thi-o-pi-a 



! !■ 



mil 



lii 



I 



so 



A NEW dUlDE, fee. 



He li-0'^po-Hs 

Hi-CM*a''''])o-li3 

Li'''^thii-a-ni-a 

Ly.:carO-nira > 

Ma-ce-do-ni-a 

Ma-ge-la'*'ni-ca 

JV[ax-i-mi''''Ji-an 

Me-tro-po^1i-tan 

l>Je-bu-za^''r^-clan 



1 » 



Ki-co-me-di-a 
ivV rhi-la-de)-phi-9- 
Sa-mo-thra-ci-a 
^can-di na-vi-a 
Sex-a-ge^;si-ina 
Tlie-o-do-si-us 
7hcs.sa-lo-ni-an9 
Tran-syl-va-ni-a 
U-ui'Ver-fii-ty 



'■ ' TADLE 11. 

^jote. r^e Accent bfthcfolloiving Words is on iliefouri^ 

t . • ■• ■ 

E^^stre^nia-du-ra 



j\Tber-ga-Yen-ny 

A-ha-su-c-rus 

A^iex cin-dret-ta 

A''''fi.n«r.-ihe-a 

(bon stan-ti-no-ple 

li;c-cle-si-a''''stes 

ii^pa-jihro-di-tus 



Hi'^spa''''ni-o-la 

La-o-di-ce-a 

Ne-bu-chad-nez-zar 

Pe-lo-pon-ne-sus 

Stur-min-ster-New-ton 

Thes-a-Jo-ni-ca 



PROPER NAMES OF SIX SYLLABLES* 

Note. The /Accent on the fourth Syllable, 

A -bel-beth-ma-a-cah Hi^sto-ri-o'^gra-phy 
Be^ro-dach- Ba'la-dan MC^di- ter-ra-ne-aii 
Ec-Gle-si-a^sti'Cue Me-sc-po-ta-mi-a 



^ laeto cife^atDe 



TO 



: ENGLISH tongue; 



PART II. 



r^! 



■P" 



A TaUd of Wordk tfi^ 
» eni in Spelling 

All, to 1)3 troubled 

A/ct malt liquor 

Airy one of tl^ elements 

Arcy^ they are 

Heiry to an estats 

All, every one 

i4w/, to bore holes 

Alloxv'ciy granted 

Aloud, with a noise •. •^' 

AJiar, for sacrifice <^ 

Alter, to chanjjs 

i4;z, a particle 

Anjt, a woman's name 

Ant, a pismire 

/Im;i/, uncle's wife' • 

Ara?/, good order 

Arraij\l tb clothe 

A&soit, an agreement 

Ascent, going; vi|) 

Augur, a soothsayer ' 

Auirer, for cdrpenters 

i?a//, a surety for debt 

Bale, of cloth or sitlir^' 

2ia/(/, without hu'r 

Baxdd cried aloud^ 

jBa//, a round substance 

Bavd, to cry aloud 

Barbara, a woman's name 

Barhary, a country 

Barlfcrry^ a friut 



^«w^ /;2 SQundt but dfjjer' 
and Signification* 

Bare, na!:^d 
Bear, a bca^st 
Bass, In music- 
Base^ vilo 

Baize, cloth so called 
Bciy<^, bay trees 
Beer, to drink 
iJ/^;*, to carry the dead 
■Bsan, pulse . 
Been, was at a place- 
Beat, to strike 
i36'<?^, an herb- 
Bettce, a pint flask of wine 
Betty, Elizabeth 
Berry, a small fruit 
Byry^ to lay in the graven 
Bile, a swelling 
Boil, as water on the firO' 
Blevsy didbl«w, as the wiit3 
Blue, a colour 
Blight, a blast' 
Blue, a- flower 
Board, a plank 
Bord, made a hole 
Boar^' a beaf t ^ 

i^oor, a country follotJ' 
Bore, to n>ake a bole 
Bold, confident 
Boxvl'dy dkl bo\HT 



88 



A NEtV GUIDE 






a 



Jiolty fbr a doQ? 

Boully meal 

TioxjOi tiorbend 

Bought a branch 

Pay, a Ia<r 

Buoxfy to bear up 

Boxvy to slioot with 

Beau^ a fiiie. gentleman - " 

BrctkQy an herb 

Breaky to part asiiiider 

Bread, to eat 

Bredy brought up • 

Breaches, broken places 

Breeches, to wear . 

Burrou\ for raJJbits 

Borough, la corpori^tioa 

%, near , ;^^y ' 

But/, for money 

JJrm\ breT7etn , 

Bruise, to break 

,^m/, a particle 

Butt, two hogsheads 

Cain, Abel's brother 

CanCf a shrub 

Calais, in France 

Chalice, a cup 

Ca//, to cry out 

Caul, ^. periwig. 

Calendar, an Account of time 

Cahnder, to smath clotli 

Can, to be able 

Cann, to clrlftk ouj iof 

Cannon, a gun 

Canon, to rule 

Capital, a chief 

dapitd, a tower in Rora^ 

<!2(i?«>a.¥, (joarse cloth 



Crtr<3?, to play with 
Carfi?, to dress wool 
Cart, to carry things in 
Chart,' a description of a place 
Cdshier, a cash-keeper 
Cftahife, to disband 
Cell, a hut 
Rell, to dispose of 
Cellar, the lowest room 
^Uer, tiiat selleth » 
Ckmeri fbr incense 
Chisor, a reformer 
Cession, a resigning 
Sessf&H, assi^zes, 
f-^hair, to set in 
Chare, a job of work 
^Choler, rage 
Collar, for tlie neck 
0?i7m^, of'a roonji. 
Sealing, setting of a seal 
C/o?z, a young sprig ^ 

JSiow, a mount so cabled 
■0ironical, of long cantinuancn? 
Chronicle, a history 
Clerk, a book-keepsr , 
Clerky a clergyman 
Clause, of a sentence 
Claws, of a bird or beas^t- 
Climb, to get up a tree 
Climei in geography 
Close, to shut iip 
Clothes, garments.. • 

Coa;f , a garment . 
Cote, a co«age 
Coarse, homely, 
Course, order 
Complement, the- remainder 
Compliment, to speak obligingly- 



TO THE EBTOLIMI TONGUE. 



M 



Concert, of music , 

Consorty wife of a. sovertign 

Cousirti relation 

Cozen, to cheat 

Council, an assembly 

Counsel, to adviso 

Cruise, to sail up and down 

Cruse, a little vessel 

Current, a funning stceom 

Currant, a berry 

Courier, a messenger 

Currier, a dresser of leather 

Cree/f, of the sea 

Creak, to make a noisa 

Creivel, worsted 

Cruel, fierce 

Dane, a man of Denmark - 

Deign, to vouchsafe 

Dam, to stop wa.tGsr-" 

Damnf to cund«»na ' 

Dai/, twenty-four hours 

Deij, a magistrate in Barbiify 

Deari of great value 

Deeri in a park 

Bctc, from heaven • 

Due, a debt^ 

Do, an act" 

Die, to decease 

D^!/e, to stain cloth 

Dire, dreadful 

Di/er, a stainer of cloth . 

Disease, a sickness 

Disseize, to dispossess 

Doe, a female, deer 

Dough j paste oc ksiYon 

Do7ie, acted 

Dzf», colour 

Dredge, a flour Ifox 

Di-udge, a slave 

H 



V> 



V 



Earinor, the time of harvest 

Ear-nnQf, a ring for the ear 

Eaten, devoured 

Eaton, a town's name 

Er, the son;of Judul* 

Err, to make a mistake 

Eane, a weather^ cock 

Fain, desirous 

Fei^n, to dissemble 

Faint, weary: -^'hTJ i 

Feint, a false W^cR 

Fair, comely ' 

Fare, a customary duty 

Fellon, a whitlow • 

Felon, a criminal- 

File, a metal i . > r.i 

J'o//, to overcome ' 

2'Vr, wood . . . 

Fur, shin ^ 

P/fjrt, an insect . VV 

i'V(?e, to run 

Flew, did fly 

J^Ywe, soft hair of a rabbi^ 

Flour, for -bread 

Flptuer, of the field . ' . 

Forth, abroad * 

Fourth, in nun^e£ 

Foul, nasty 

Foxvl, a bird 

Frays, squirrels 

Phrase, a sentence 

Gall, a bitter siibfitanjce 

Gaul, a Frenchman 

Gargil, a distempet in ge^sq, v 

Gargle, to wash the mouth , -i 

.Gilt, with gold : , \. 

Guilt, sin r : ,'•;; 

Glaire, the white of a»/egg /\ 

GVar*, to daazJie. li.. f V" 

2 



9<r. 



A^K^^W CiriDBi* 



Grate, {or coalr 
Qrfxtt^ large 
Giffiter, ' for tJie xii^tine^ 
Greater, larger ♦'-, ? 
CV^T//';, a town's nam©.. 
G»tzt\ to cat grass 
Gaease, nasty fat 
Greece, a country 
Groan y to Bigh 
Crstvii, increased ' 
IJail, to salute 
Mnlef to draw along • 
llarfy abcaf^t 
//^ar^, the seat of life 
Hnre, of the field 
//«/>, of tl\e head 
JJerCy'm this place 
• near, to hearken 
/Mo, to cut 
Ihiey colour 
Hugh , a man's name : 
High, lofty 
//oy, aisUipi 
//zj?7, that man 
Hymn, a sacred song* 
Hire, wages 
/ ligher, m ore high 
Hoar, frost 

7V:hore, a lewd v/omaa ;; 
Hole, hollowness 
Whole, perfect 
Hwyp, for a tub 
IVknop, to cry x)ut 
Hm0ii to hamstring 
Hiift to swagger 
/, myself 
Vi^e, to see with 

rii, i.wiU' > . •' 

Ikt tUe side of a-clwrcb 



//.«•/?, an inland" 
0//j of olives 
/n, within 
''Inn, for travellei's 
Indict, to prosecute • 
Indite, to compose 
A^//^ -to murder 
A7/«, for bricks 
Knaver a dishonest man v 
Nave, of a wheel 
Knight, by honour 
Nig/ity the evening 
Knou), to be acquainted-i 
A^o, nofeBOii 
Knetv, did know 
AiE^o, not old or used ' 
Knottm, discovered , 
None, neitJier 
Knows, he knowetU- 
Nose, of the face 
Lade, to carry watet.- 
Ltiid, placed 
Lain, did lie 
Lane, a narrow passage^ 
Leak, to let an water. 
Leek, a. pot-herb 
Lees, dregs of wine • 
Leese, to lose 
Lessen, to makfe leas^ 
Lesson, a reading 
Uer, in wait. 

Liar, or Li/ar, a teller of Kes 
Li/re, a musical instrumeiiti 
Limb, a member:.- 
Limn, to paint 
Line, length 
Loin, of veal 

XiVimwcMf,-. the prpportion of 
the face r 



^PO THE EN(rr.ISH TONOUR. 



&i' 



' M.inimeHt, a medicm©. 

Ledy did lead 

Lead, metaJ it' 

///>, to lie a longr 

Lye, a falsity, 

Loy bt'hcld 

Lowj humble 

A/«<//*, finished 

Maid J a viriflftv^ , . 

i/a//i, the , .iiefthin^. 

Mane, of a horse 

iy/ff/^, the he 
Mail, armour 
Mall, a wood^iv hamms* 
Maid, to beat 
Manncri cust«ra 
Manor, lerdsbip 
MaHen, a bird 
^lartin, a man'g namq 
Afmn, of tow value 
A/«Vw, behaviouc 
Meat, to eat 
A/ee^ together 
Mete, to measure 
i?/^/a^, gold, silver, &c< 
Mettle, brigkness 
Mevos, for hawks 
MHfe, to meditate- • 
Afi/^, an insect 
Micrht, strength 
Moan, to laRientT' 
Mown, cut down • 
Moat, a ditch 
Mote, in the eye 
More, in quantity 
Motver, thiit moweth 
Mo, more 

iV/oto, to^ut down gras^ 
Mortar, to pound iii 



Mortar, made of lime 

Saught, bad 

Nought, noihittg 

Na^, not 

^ngh, as a hor^se 

A'rtw, tidings 

Noose, a knot 

M;^, denying 

Knot, to entangle 

0«/, of a boat. 

O'er, over 

Ore, of metal 

Of, belonging to 

Q^, at a distance 

Ohf alas 1 

(hve, to be indebted! 

One, in number 

^ow, did win 

Our, of us 

//o7^r, sixty^minutCB 
Palate, of the mouth 
Pallet, a little bed 
Prt/<:', colour 
Pail, a vessel 
/^«//, a fui? 'al cloth 
Pai^l, a man's name 
Pain, torment 
Pane, a square of glas^ 
Peal, upon the beiis 
Peel, thd outside . 
Pear, fruit 
\Pair, a couple^ 
i^ar<?, ro cut otf 
Peer, a lord 
PiV?r, a krga- glass 
Peter, a man's name 
Pet re, salt 
P/?«^, half a quarfe 
Pointf a stop 







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WEBSTER, N.Y. 14580 

(716) 872-4503 






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iW'KEW GUIDE 



'M 



place, of abode ■ 

plaice, a fi»h 

plain, even 

Plane, to make smooth ' 

Ptaie, a flat piece of meti^ 

plait i a fold in a garment • 

pleas, co\iri& oiX'dm 

please, to content 

plough^ the instrument 

plough, to mfike a furrow 

pore,' of the skin 

Pour, as water 

practice, exercise 

Practise, to eKetaas- 

Pray, ta -beseech 

Preij, a booty 

Py-aise, a commendatsicte ■ 

Prays, he prayetn 

Principal, chief < 

Principle, the fiwt rule - 

Profit, advantage 

Prophet, a foreteller 

Quean, a nasty slut 

Queen, a king s wife 

Quire, of paper 

Choir, of singera 

Rag, a tatter 

Wrag, e. sort of stdne 

Rain, water 

Reign, rule as a king 

/i<?in, a bridle 

Raise, to set up 

Rays, sun beams 

Race, to run 

J?fl,9e, to demolish 

Red, a coiour 

Read, did read 

Reddish, somewhat fed 

Radish, a roo^ 



JRcerf, a shrub 

Read, in a book 

Rere, the back pari> 

7?e(7r, to erciet 

Rest, ease 

W^res^, to force 1 1 , 

^e^c^, to vomit 

IVretch, an unhapfiy raafe^ 

Rhyme, in vor^e 

iR?m<?, a freezing; mi«|' 

jRifl^ a foreign coinr' / 

i?^^rt/, princely 

Ricei QOtn ' ' . 

/Jtsc, advancemetit^ 

Rye, com 

^Fry, crooked 

Rinv^ the bells 

Wring, the hands - 

Bite, a eafemony 

Rights just a*wi true 

Wright, a workwaa 

W'i-ite, with a per^ 

R&de, did ride , 

JRoflfl?, the highway 

Roxad, did row 

/?o^, a kind oi'4eQt ' 

R&vu, a rank 

j?odfl?, fourth ^mQim a^' 

Rude,, impudent : < 
Rome, a city . 
Room, part of a h<Hiae^ 
Rheum, spittle 
iiote, by heart , 

Wrote, did write 
Rough, not smooth 
Bm^ a neckclo^ 
Sad, of a ship 
Sfl/c, selling 
Salary, wag0s 



TO TOE ENefitS» *<»n3lflB; 



m- 



Geleri/, an herb 
Scillyy an island - 
^ill^y! foolish 
Saveri Ulat savet^ 
Savour i taste or *fnell. 
Saviour y Jesus Chria(t 
Scene t of a stage 
Seen, boIieW 
Seas, great watetfr 
Sees, seeth 
Seize, to lay hoM of^ 
Sea, a great water 
See^ b^old 
Seary to blim 
Seer, a prophet 
Sent, oidered «elt'i.f-\ 
Scent, smell 
Seignior, a1ord<- 
Senior f elder ' • 
Bhhar, a prop 
Shore, the sJei-Goa^ 
Shewn, did shew 
Shone, did shifle 
Site, situation 
Site, to suramon- 
SigJit, seeing 
Sink, to go dowD 
Cinque, five 
Sloe, frwit 
Slotu, tardy 
So, thus. 
SoTv, the seed' 
.SVtc, with the needlq 
Soal, of the shoe. 
Sole, « fish 
So7ne, a part 
Sicm, the whole 
Son, a man-child 
Sun, the heavenly light 



Sore, an ulcer 

iSoar, to mount upwards 

Stare, to look earaettiy 

Stair, a step 

Stains, spots 

Staines, the nameofa |i^a(Se 

Starling, a bird 

Sterling, English tndttcrjr 

JS/ea/, to f <rf) 

/S/ce^, metal 

Steer, a young bullock 

Steer, to guide a ship 

Stile, for a passage 

vS/y/e, for » writing 

Straight f not ci'0<^ed' 

S^r«iV, .narrow 

Succour, help 

Sucker, ayoun^t#lig; 

Subtile, cunning 

Smftle, weight 

Tacks, small nails V 

7<7.r, a rate 

Tail, the^nd 

Tale, a story 

Tare, weight jJloWed 

T^ar, to rend in pieces:* 

Team, of horses 

Teetn, to go with yoang^ 

Threw, did throw 

Thcough, qi^ite through;^ 

Their, of them 

There, in that place 

throne, a seat of statfe 

Throtmn, cast 

The, a particle 

Thee, yourself 

Time, when 

Thyme,' an herU 

To, iuJto> 



Pi 



t-- 



mmm 



\/ 



/i- NEW c^moE, &<?* 



ToOi likewise 
Two, a cowplc 
ToCf of a foot 
Tom, draw along 
Told, as a tale 
ToWd, as a bell 
Toury a journey 
Totoerf a fortified place 
Traj/j a butcher's tray 
Tret/; the number 3 
Vale, a v4lley»~ 
Veil, a covering : 

Vain, jiseless 

Vane, to shew the winci 

Vein, of tllebtoot 

Vice, ill habit 

Vise, a screw 

Undo, to take tp piecofl . 

Undue, not due 

Wade, to go in the watet 

Weighed, in tho balance 

Wait, to expect 

Weight, for the 8<»le8 

Wale, the maj k of a whip 

Whale, a sea fish 

Ware, merchandise 

Wear, to put o» clothcfr 

^<?re, was 

Where, • at w hat place 



.^f>.«,.A'f- 



flra5^<r, to spend 

Waiit, the middi^ 

Wat/, to walk in 

Weigh, to poize 

^p?/, forty bushels 

Whey, milk and rur^iet • 

W^ea/, g»od 

Wheal, a pimple 

Wheel, of a cart- 

Fr<7a^, not Strong 

Week, severe day* ., 

Weather, disposition of the ai?" 

Whether, which of the twa 

White, colour 

Wight, an island- 

Wither, to decay 

Whither, at what p^j»cd 

iViU, a trick c— . 

While, in the mean time 

ffW/, of trees: *f ~ 

fFbtt'rf, was willing a ^ 

Wrath, anger 

Wroth, to be angrjf 

y^, yourselves 

Yea, yes 

i-Jtctf, a sheej^^" 

Yexv, a tree 

Yiwi, yoursetf 



^' 



n 



;t-- 



:^ jiSeto (feirtbe: 



TO 



'^HE ENGLISH TONGUE; 



«*a* 



)f theai?' 
e twcf 



[me 



PART III. 



~vi:l 



A PRACTICAL ENGLISH GRAMMAIt 



,'W" ;'?■:.■ 



CHAP. I. 



"il^ 



j»ro: 



OF GRAMMER IN GENEIIAL»: 

^.."Vt HAT is Gramwarf 

A. Grammar is the science of IjStterg, or the Art of wriiipg 
^d speaking properly and syntactically. 

Q. What do you mean by English Gtamtnar f 

A, The art of wiiting and speaking the English Tongue 

operiy and syntactically. 

Q. How is Grammar divided ? 

A, Grammar is divided into Four Parts ; fhihegraj^u, 
prosody ^ Analogy, and Syntax, 

? OF ORTHOGRAPHY. 

Q. VmAis(^fthographi/f V*^ 

A. Qrthographu tctjcheth the trqe characters kh14 pcw^^-^ 
the7e«m, and tne proper divisipn of syllaBlesy ttord^y aind 
sentences, 

OF LETTERS. 

Q.Whiit Is SL letter f 

4' A le^er isk significant mark or note, of viliich syllabiei 
ifiire confounded. 

Q, How many English tetters are there ? 

4* Six and twenty. 

fl. Which be they? 

■$* Xhey dre these following, with their powers and names : 



06 



f-A NEW CUiDE 



I 
\ 

I? 
11 




Letter*. Their name?, and poweri, or soundt. - 

A or a A long, as io cape.- short t^s in cap : broad, as in imi 

B b Bee 

C c Cee 

D d JDetf 

E e JS lopg, ^ i« ?'ie^ ; short,- -ee in mefi* 

H h y^v^*;/* 

I i / long, as ia tim^ : short,^ m tinx 

-J j «% 
K k Kau 

Jkl m Em ■■ 

N ..n ..'JBw '^lipf - ^- ■ " 

5 O o long.vte ia ko** ♦• s^ort^ as i« «p/l 

:P p Pee 

jR ' r >4/r 

t t Tee ■ 

y V Vee 

tJ u Yu Jong, as i» fiwie .• 4i<«rt,:as, m im' 

W w D&vUe yu 

. ,Z z Z^d , : ' ^ -y \ ■::,■' . '■- ' ,-. 

Q. Do these £c^«/?r*.alwa^%eip ihe;r aw» ||{*turai soiiw^ r 

A. No. . 

Q. What Ltiters^e those -which ;dp,^<\tjil5fay?<*fep.thew? 

-v«y»riniattt«al 8©U4id. . , i . j 

J. lAey are by c,^iJ^;p hho^ U-h %^i U,i^ a^^^ «oo- 
;.l)le letters,. cA, *^, and 7?A. 

f}. . Give me an examiyl-e g$ eaf h .? . 
l4, ' 1 . J3 is sounded like t In suutUe, 

2. C :he%e a, "» w» ^?: **»^. ^> ^s ah^^ys. ^o.Vin4wt. IJke ^ ; as 

Wn cat, cordy cup, cloih, cramp; but before: e^/flMrid^,, if ajways 

sounded like s ; a^ in eeUar, civil, ci/pj^iefis,: hM<^Pi sqanded 

like s in musck ; and in words derived,ljrfjm!% *\^9i*^"» "*^'" 

ing %^ after it, as in wacA/ne, •..,-.. 

*\Vben e is not soundecf at the end of « word, it is calleii e ffnal ; which 
some times serves to lengthen the sound of the foregoing TOweH as in 
.J^ ; aod sometimes is redundant, as in giv^, 



TO THE liHLisH TOlkjUJE. 



Xyft 



4. F»8ouade*like^,ihk^ ; .V 

. ^ sounded like *; «» mffeAilemaik/irmht ^^..^^^i " ^^ 



7. L is 06iitfdfed like m m ^m^n: ' 

8. O is sounded lijk^ a lom in all^ 'r'UitJj, ^u • ' ' ' 
and like « short in ^r^^^ «^i»y,-i|ke.e short in teom^f ,; 







13. Y atfte-end of mon«wylli|rf>lei, is go«ihd«dlike i Icite A. 

It i» sooiided U^e i (ihdrt, Bsin i%jw; andat^e end of iS 

H. a « sounded lite ,ya, as in choir, chorister. ^ 

rtir* *1* f "«* ™es «t the end of a w<W-d, and ahf avs tih-whSn 

«m* Sr "' *^' "'^"'' '**'"•* to be osed, and wheS.the 

at *e Si^St'"^/'*' '° ^"^ T^,r the front of sent^ndSi,, atel 
•? aTes rifTrfT. n7'T' / ¥'P"'Pe'^ names' of pe«o^ 

h^^w^^^^^'^^^'f^-P"^ »«°'^' "'that 
and aflLTo- ^TP''^*/ -n a 'entenye : also after a fujr sto^, 

ateiy otter a fuU stop.- likewise^ ?»hole words and «oiiietimes 

J- . i .u -^""H'' *?■■ "fnxnient eiAe, and always &e p'rWoun 

iTr''oIa^''^,2^'"t>''' ''■^^ '^''?° i-'^viiS' aSd& 
otner places tire smaU letters iiuet be used. . 



in. 
■ 






I 



Ma' 
iT 






a, 



\.. 



98 



A NEW OUIDIP 



vf. Sometimes they stand for wbqkf'Qrjk, Af ^. A. baeho. 
It of arts? B.i), bVlielor of divinTty ; V. D. doctor mdi- 
vinity, or the like ; as you may find yore at lip-ge at the end 
ofthistl^ircjlpart; or ei8e.th^j stand, Jor mwibers, and are 
calleti Numeral Letters ^ ih\^^ 



li. two 

III. Three 

IV. orini. Fow 

V. Fiv* 

VI. Six 
VIL Seven 
\{\l. Eight 
i:ji. Ni«e 

X. T«n 

XI. Eleven 
XH. Twelve 



X XV. Fifteen 
2 XVIv b«te(in 
■* XVII. Scvem^en 
; Xyni. Eighteen 
s XIX J^inetfeen 
* XX Twenty 
■ :t XX|. Twenty-one 
X XXX. Thirty 
, XL. Forty 
S 1. Fifty 



.* XCII. Ninety -two 

* C. A hundred 

* CC. Two hundred 

i CCC. Three hundred 
J CCCC. Four hundred 

* D. Five hundred 
X J>C. Six hundred 

i DCa Seven hundred 

* DCCCEEeht hundred 
DCCCC. Ninehundred 
<M. One Tbduwnd /S 
MDCGCXII. One ' 

thousand eight hunr 
dred and twelve. 



X 

X 



I liX. Sixty 
V** *-,.,w * LXX. Seventy 

X^li. Thirteen ; i 4 ^^^^r ^^'5^*^ 
XIV. Founeen >* XC. Ninety 

^ IJow ar^ the ^erter* naturally divided? 
ji, Iiito lott^ and c<w»5ona«^i»/ 

f r? uilts a1!^ter which ^Ives a fuH and perfect sound 
of itself ,1 d without which there can be no syllable. t 

Q. H 'w many vowels are there m English i* ^ 

1 There are six ; «, .^, i, o, «, and^ when it follows * 
consonmt. *• -' 

10. What is a consonant f , j j •♦ui.;^. 

^ A co»5Q«an/ is a letter that cannot be pounded with«^ 
a ^^welTr* without e; therefore all letters, except tb? 

vowels, «'- ^-^--^F sYJ-LABI-ES. 

iQt What is a sylUthU 9 ■! . ^^^ 

A.1 yjte is either one letter, a. ^ .- or more Hum ob% 

as.)Mo«. _ 

OF SPELLING, OR DIVISION OF SYLLABLES. 
O How do vou divide your syllables f , 

A Bv^ing words asunder fcto convenient parts, m order 

to shewffi we pronunciation and Original formahon, whicb 

" riThoV^a:; '^TS^ the doctnne of ^«», be coi- 

'"xflll spring or division ofsyttaiUs, may be comprehea- 
4«(l in «V«» 8«^ei»l rul^ 



W fnt ENctisn TONotriTr 



99 



4, baclidi> 
tor in (li- 
the end 
and are 



et^-two 
red 

i^ndred 
re hundred 
ur hundred 
indred 
undred 
en hondred 

rht hundre4 
linehundied 
housand fy 
11. One ' 
d eight huiv 
d twelve 



feet soun^ 



; follows 4 

'<*■■ 

ed with^ 
e^ccept tb^ 



5 ihan OH^ 

ABLES. 

rt«, in order 
ition, whicli 

ling be con- 
c^iiprehenr 



^ What is the first general rale for division df syllables ? 

^. A consonant between twa voieels globes to tfie latter syl- 
&ble ; as ba-nisk* "^ •> 

Q. What is the first ^etitibii t6 this rule ? 
t;i4'. These consonahti» ttf andx; gu tathe former syllal^ie ; 
fisjlow'ert ex'ilei, " v 

Q. What is the second exceptibh r 

^. Words formed and compounded' must b^ durided ac- 
cording to the fifths and rfxth general rules. ' ,, _ 

Q, What is the seddhdf general'irule fSr division of syirabFes ? 

A. Two consonants in the middle of & word) that are proper 
to b«gin a word, must begin* the syllable togethier ; its cluster. 

Q, What exception have you to this rule ? 

A. All such derivatives, #ftose primitives endit^ in e final, 

drop the e in spelling, Imve this consonaiits^ in the micidle 

of the word parted^ though they be proper. to be^i^iiwdird ; 

is kotise-holav 

Hote. That d/, //, kl^ and s!, are often used tt> b^^ii^ tjllahles, though 
Aej begin no wotif iaal(t'dlettur-tlefWrin*klifp^sUe. ' ' 

_ ^. _ '■ ■.. -.ItuLE in. , ,',_;^'''' 

Ql WKat is the third" geiileB^ rule fo,r oivision, qfj^ljables ? 
A, Two consonants in the middle of a word, .that are not 

proper to begin a word, must-be divided;^ as jiftn^^er.' 
Q. What exceptions haye yotf to this Vule?'^^^ ^ ';^^^^^^ 
A, Two consonants*in jthe* middle of a'derivativei tlibugh 

tfiey be not proper to bi^in a w^rd, must not be, divld^id : as 

stand-ard-^ rr •. : ; 

^jt^fLnW'- . '■[ .'.: ' [ ..> 
Q. What is the fourth general rule for dwislon of sylfidiles ? 
A. If two vowels come together, not making a diphthong 
diey must be divided ; as, a^ in-^M^lj fio in ex'tra^or-di-na^ 
ry.4 eo in pi'-ti'oUs ; ia mr^-al ; to in w'-o/ ; iu in di-ur-nnl ; 
oe in. c(>-er-ci'on. I ua ia0'4UHU i ue in du'-ed ; ui in ra-iw, 
cm^grK^i'tu ; and. wo mcon*gru-'Qus, 

Note 1 . Ua^ we, ui.i arid t»|, become diphthongs after q ; as quar-rel^ 
ques'tiouy qtti-et^ qUoM^hU)r iikewwe ua in per-suade^ per-iua-atont 

\c. -'■■' ; , 

2, Though eo cannot properly be called a^diphthongrjet those vowels 
are not divided in pen-pie y leb-pard, ^. 

PULE y. 

Itv Wliat is the fifth genets^ ^^for diviwoo of syllables? 




■M 






,n^ 



Ai.»RW,ai|H5)B 



A, Let woi^s formed^ or derived be divided according ta 

-) ^^j** 3^*i *? ^^* conn^j^pence, of this rule ? 

A. These 'tewninations, -age, -e'dy -en, -er, rest, -et, yfth^ 
'ing, *uhf 'omt-ardy -al^. -«r, w^htnio gobj thepiselves ia 
■aS®!/?? • .^ herb'^age, boast-ed",^ ^old-en, knc/w-est, laich-eir, 
hifa*^eth, hear-er^ hear-ing, fool-ish, ru-inrousy ^tand-^rdy 
mo-nu-ment-alt ex-nct-or^ 

Q. What is thq first exception^ to tl^is rule ? 
A. MQriosytlabka^ and words Accented upon. the last s^jlfa- 
ble, ending in a sin^Je coptaonant, withmit a dipthong forego- 
ing, douj^le their Jimd, consonant, when they take any of the 
. formative endings ; and then it naay be proper to put the lattec 
; consonant w.itrr th« termiaatioB ; ABpot-tage, bioUedi bldUtest^ 
UoUteih, bldt-iing^ bht^^^ rotrteriy slut-tkh, a-bd-tou . 

^ 4vf7%^^<^f)%^^. f %ar t^e. any ^f these tf rpinfttiops, e^ 
• j,pm?«j9SV?v?o^n >«'*^J^»g»vand tlpna coosoi^nt iif*ay,be npt 
' to the tdrmmation ; as, lurhe^ 'wirifd, iui'tetK wri^ter, ten- 

Note 1 . Whfre pMtiog' •w^y- ibf f ^ooM <sseaf c uny canfMtioii in the- 

•enw, I aUtue to retnii^ itj, a»j f^ftra the verb tinge, I would write 

^ 'j:!Sij?*bDf*!r'^^ todistin'guiihitfrpm ting-eth^sing.ing, when the 

^ ' wttrd baj^jj^ns'H* ^ wntten on <wo dtfKtr'ent line* for wiuit of roonw 

mmmir<ii^ m • fibaHive th* Tmt syllable •hort, it it « much bitter 

K»*Ak'^.^f^r;\p\H .t|)« temuoBtioii.go by itself ; at for-gm-en^ 

Jof>^iv*ft!g,j0!^-^n,:Comyms» 

,^8* &»^h Priin?t%«)« »' «J|ke «"Iyy aft*r,^pm» have w»»» of tb«. forego. 

lA^ ccmkoiAantt xottiid to Jt ; iHt eam^Mtr bn« after u^ i», aad «, it mutt 

«ot<ieak)n«; *$ glwy, jlahfjy, ^mh^ ' ^ * t -r 

BuirK vr, 
Q. What is the sixth gfenerafrule for diyisioft of syllables ?" 
^. Let comfiouflid wor^af be reduceds into thoir primitive^ 

Q. Wl^tis.thefirBtxC!{>iMeqae|jkCeof'thi»»ule? 

A. A IM-eposition, a^, pi^, it-, un^, mb-^^ per-, dia*^ re-f,, 
jDr*-, nrnst be pronounced by itself; 1:3, ad-e-fuate, in-i-qni-^ 
tVy un-e-q?ialt svit^urbsy jicrruii'tmt'iurCi dis-ur-nUey re-fro* 
mh .P.r^'f>i-ous- Yeiyife s^|>^pi^, Jusi^ead ofjuev^ufe,.'^ 

Q, What is the second coAsequfnj(;e of thiV rule ? 

J, BetA will be the first. s)rlla^Jle jp Bah'a-ni/, Mbth-d^, 
Beth'tt-ba-roj Beth-es-da, Sfc,. 

Q. What u; the third conseouence of t)^ ri!|le ? 
' A, The tern^i^^tion 4i^ will go by itself at the end of pro- 
per names ; as Cfyji-hamy Fe-vers-hdnty Bt^^k-ing^jianii EU^ 
hamy except South-'ffn,]* and IVroth-am, * ' 



TO THE EKGLISlI TONGUE. 



101 



H, When thrfee consonants meei in die middle of a word 
how must It be divided ? u c ui u wora, 

.ylU' ,"«&!:?''" '" '"' » w<«.Wh«y ™.y J, .„a .,, 

.11^; ^t^^ 'I? •*^.'^ Pf°I**' *» be^i*H,word, or the hist of 

* ir ^;y ''«Bi'"''7y"»ble together X I. hUrcd thim-hle. 

iwti! "'= '*^ ''/>"»* them be proper to end a word, the 

Q. v/hatia a dijiM/iongf ' 

ri. What is tt fripHthongit 

\J: ^^^'^^'^jf t^e unitii*g of three vowels in one syl- 
lable ; as tea m A'dteu. • ^ "j'* 

M ry^ u ^ Cli!' WORDS. 

tif- OfwIlatabWrrf* consist? 
^. Of one Or 'more syllables. 
Q^ What is the use of words ? 

'O A ft^-K ^ """* '^°^^ **^ *^*"^« *<> another person, 
f^. After wha* manner ? 

'it. By jdinlng them to^th^ in sentences. 

n^ wr. . ^^ SENTENCES^. 

Hi What 18 a 'sentence f 

te,f^ .^**^44^J^.J«^^ together in construction make asen- 

teg^^& ""^ "''?m ^' ^ ''^' ^''^S and read. 
:i«^ Stdfis Alia marks ^4te^^^ 

*» ™^ u ^^ '^™*** ^NI> MARKS, 
se^^ ^^ **^ ^^ a«d mar/t. of distinction u^d in a 

Q. Wh^ 18 a cDwimar f 
., \'^u^. '^°'^"^' marked thus, { , ) is a note olvrtefeDlration 

Q. W^t IS the nse of thJe comma f - 

^. ;t to <tf i«ie formdngfUijJhing Mrprdd of the same kind • 



-lar 



T! 



ii 



I 






H 



- u 



i 



''I 



102 



A NEW OVlf>E 



. » 

OB «o«n.f, vfrhs, nnd nr/rffrA.?, coming together in the game sen- 
tence ; for clividiaK long scnttnccH into short parti, ami for 
thu taking away utanihiguities. 

Q, Give an example ? i ' \.^^\^ V '* .• , ''i. r 

A. Mature eiotlics the beuHts with hair,,, the birds With fea- 
thers, and the fuhes with scales. ,;, , ^ , 
$. What is a semicolon V . , „ I u- 
vl. A semicolon, niarked thus ( ; ) notes aoiitWle breathing 
between the comma and the colon. '' » 
&, What '^ tlie use of the sefnicoiou f 
A, Its dilcf use is in distinguishing contraries and frequent 

divisions. ,-?• ' i';-, .v- ■," . '^ 

^ Give an example ? * ' i' ^ ^ 

yl. You consider Uie power of riches ; but not of vii^tue, 
O Whiit is a coloTi ? ■ '♦'• '« .-, >'r * ■ 

yl'. The cr;/on marlced thus ( : )' is a note of long breatliing, 
as is exemplified below. , 

Q. What is the use of a colon f i • i, u 

A» It distinguisheth a perfegt part of a sentence, which has- 
a full meaning of its own ; but yet leaves the nund m suspense 
and expectation to w^'Et follows. ,' 

H, Give an example ? - i * « 

A. Before all things, it is necessary for a man to take -a true 

estimate of himself i for we. mostly thiu|c ourselves able to do- 

more than we can. 

Q. What other use does a colon ser\'e to :* \^; - , 

/]. It is also used bt^bre-a comparative conjunction, m a 
similitude. 

P. Give an example ?j,^,r . ... i, . j:„ 

A As we perceive the shadow upon the sundial, bat dis- 

ccvn not its progression •, and as the shrub or grass apPfa^s^i 

lime to be grown, but is seen by .none ^to grow i so also t^| 

proficiency of our wits, advancing slowly by small improve. 

• mcnts. is perceived only after some distance ot time., 

^ What is a period ? .J.S .. , - 

X 'V^'J>j^riod is a fiiU pomt tliius ( ., > 

9, Of vt^it use is the T>e>-/V? . » ^ , ♦ I 

T It de.m)tes the full ending andiinishing of a wlipIesenH 
tence, at the conclusion of which it is.ajways placed. 

(J. 'Give an^xi^mple ? , , ^^ . 4 ii» , ..^ ... '• 

X There is 1x6 nian without his pecuhar failing. 

a What are the proper pauses of these stops;:*, 

2. The properspaust; or restofeach ot these stops may bel 

'^ * J Viw, ♦:«,^ At ct^innmir. or restinn. at ta<l 



tlra: 



S iii.-J».aW*vv». . 



TO THE ENGtlSIi- TONGtIE. 



103» 



le eainc sen- 
tt, and for 



ds with fea- 

le breathing 

liid frequent 

of victuCr. 
ig breatliing, 

:e, which has- 
d in suspense 

to takei'itrue 
^es able to da 

'■t' ' ' '• 
junction, in a 



<dial, hut dis- 
ass appears in , 
J i so also the | 
mall improve^ 
iroe., 



fa whole sen-l 
taced. 

inc. 

e stops may bel 

restinc. at thi 



comma, is the time of saying oncf at the semicolon^ one, one ;• 
at the colon t one, one ^ one f and at the p^rW, one, one ^ one ^ 
one, before you begin the «ext clause or sentence. 
Q. Which is the mark of interrogation f 
A* The not^Q^ interrogation is ^? ). 
Q, What is the use of this note ? 
A, To shew the reader when a- question is asked^ 
Q. Give an example? 
A, What is the use of this book ? 

Q, Which is the note of attmiraticn ? • 

A, The note oi admiration is (, ! )», 
Q. What is the use of this note ? 
A. It is used to express our wonder.. 
Q. Give an example? 
J. O the cares or mankind ! 

Q. WHiat are tJie pausea of these notes. (^ interrogation anA 
admiration ? 

A, They are the same as that of the penW.. 
' Q. What do you call a parenthesis ¥ 
A* A parenthesis has two crooked strokes^ thus (). 
$ Wnat is the use of a parenthesis ? 
, A, It serves to 'include one sentence in another, without 
confounding the sense of eidier ; and yet is necessary for Uie 
exnlanation thereof': and should be read with a lower tone 
of the voice, as a thing that comest in by the bj^ 
Q, Give an example ? 

A, I verily believe (nor is it a vain- belief ]^ that there is ft 
God who can reward and punish us. 

Qi What is the pause proper for the parenthesitf 
A* Each part of it is equsJ to a comma. 
Q. What is aparathesisf 

A, A parathesisf brackets t or croichetSy are usually express'^ 
ed by angular lines, thus [Jv 
^ What is the use thereof? 

A, To distinguish such words from the sentence whichare 
an explanation of the word immediately preceding. 
^ Give an example ? 
A* A treatise of iconceming'] physic, 
j^ What is a hi/phen ? 

A, A hyphen ?$ a small hair-stroke, drawn from one word" 
♦o another* thus (-). 

^ What is the use of the hyphen f 

4t It. admonisheth the reader that Uie twe words thus 



} m 



■A^ii 



A' lefeW Otjt'Dfe 



) 



! 



1 1 1? 



1- 

j, ill 



Ktl-J^^^^^'^'' '^'* l>e pronounced IHce a single Word: a» 

f JlitV.^'V-'^^ *^ connect st^llablt^ T)f the same word, wit- 

I^^^^^T'^''^^^'^'' different linen, or tbrirl 
i TAn ^"P^^^^'^g »n orK» line ; as al-tar. 
<• VVhat is ah fl;;o.v//"O^Ae ? 

A ^^^oHro^kek a commap^t^t the top ofa word, thus ('); 
^ What IS tffo use of the apostrophe ? > V ; 

.4. it denotes tJie omission of -a letter, to mdke the sound of 

lable for the sake of the i letre ; as mch'd forfiidryed - And in 

»^ What *s the usiF) of the dicHrtms 9 
bbt ;'': cS^;f ^''^""^ '"^'' to aivido HMa two ^X. 
^ What is a ^cr^/f ? 

<)uu;v^li^2^' ^^^^'li^^^ Wora, oi^^seiitende, i« left 
^ Give aft fe3t&mjy}te>- 

the 
A, Tht5^i a%m^n. 
^. What is aii o^^m^P^y 
A. The«rfAf/f*w i&ittaHc^thift-Y^I^} 
^ What is it-ttse ? ^ ^ 

rhio/f5t> ^'^'^^'^f^^^^^^^er Signify rftat .ome- 
tiie auth^^ ^"^' '^^'"'^^ "^ itHMt^eSt, in tii4 pipage of 

t mat .?^ut*"" '*"■**** i'"^'*'*' '**('«' ^ 

^ What is mupbsUs^f 

A* All o^^^sA: is niarteed thus f-^V 
J^ What is its. use? ^'^ 



I word either obsolete, uncMssical, or o\#of use; 



TOimt TBNeibWH TOKGtTEV . 



iytw 






V. 



^ WhatJ/B » potation ? 

A. A quoiiuian is & iovi]ile, cmmAt&msed, thu6V<) at 
r/the l^^ginmngtof a line. ^ ' 

A, It denptes^that .pafi^age.to be quoted or trarwcribed. 
front 8onie author mtiis own wocds. 

% Whyare pellicular ^v«rds|^inWin4he«to/iccharac^^ 
yi, 1 o inform the reader that the street of :th* sentence lies 
therein, or that they are written toc the praise, or .to the dis^ 
pr^e,, of fioracv person. .BiBsides it i8.w«ialtQf.print.aIl propei*. 
names in thia. character. ' ♦ r r*- 

OF BOOKS. 

^ How are hooks divided ?• 

A. Booh are usually divided into. chapt^irSfc^wctioiWt pam-^ 
graptis^^andi. vjerges. ^ 

^ What are chaptefs f 

Jg. What are sections ? 
jA, Sections -are the,lai:ge8t diyJsicms of* a chapter, in which 
the particular arguments of that chapter are distinctlv diidded ^ 
and treated of separately. / v* 

^^: By what marks are ««<^io#w^di»ti3QiffiM8h«d ?t 
^. By this mark {§), 
i^ What are paragraphs f 

A. Paragraphs ar*j certam Jorge fneaibers orniivisiooft of ^ * 
chapter, or. a section ? coRt^ttniiigva^peBfect sense of * 4he «ub- 
jubject treated of, and calculated for the advantage of the 
reader; because ab the end thereof, he may make,a larger. 
, pause than usual at the end of a period. 

^ By what marks are ^ra^r^^^'i^ distinguished? 
A. By this mark (^«). 



^ 



What is a verse r 



A, In prose, itJs the shortoRt division iaa chapter, as k 
largely exemplified in the Holy Bftle ; but in poetical wri- 
tmgs, it CGiiveys unto us an idea of a certain number of syl- 
labkaartkily compacted in one line, to gratify the ear. 

CHAP, ii; 
OF PROSODT= 

C >T HAf h^ro^d^ 

A. Prosodij lelcheth the true pronunciation of syHables and I 
m)rdft, accowiing.to the proper (jualities, and tones or aecent*^, 



106 



A NEW 6VtTm 






I , '■, 






OF THE QUANTITIES OF WORTHS: 

^ What mean yo\x by the qicantitT/ of a. word? 

A. The quantity of a word, or syliahle, is that by whicli^wc 
measure the time allowed for the pronunciati' - aicreofr 

^ How is the quatitity of a word divided? 

A-> It is divided into FJtort and/on^. 

^ How is the short quantity known ? 

A, By a quick pronunciation; as, not,- 

^ How is tlie long quantity known ? 

i4» By a siow pronunciatioB, or twice the time of a short 
quantity; 2ts, note, * ' 

OF THE TONE. OR ACCENT. 

J^ What is an accent ? 

A,. A tone; ot accent, denoteth the raising or falling of th< 
foice^on a syllable, according to the quantity thereof. 

j^ How many accents are there ? 

A, Theue are ihteQ accents ; the longy ihe diort^ and th< 

^mtnon, 

^ What is the long accent ? 

A. It admonisheth^ us to pmnounce the syllable slow ; 
mind;^ ' ^ 

^ What is the short acceiU t 
A It admoriisheth us to pronounce the syllable quick | as, hi 
^ What is the common a.ccent ? 

A* It hath no regard to the grammatical quantity of a sylj 
lable; but being placed over a vo>wl, denotes the tone oh 
sti-ess of voice t& be upoa that syllable : as, plenty. 

I^otc. Thesii tones, or accents, are seldom noted by English writersJ 
but only fer difference sake, as to distinguish the substantive leadX 
frotn the verb Had, or /earf;. or else to fix the accent of words off 
more than one syllable, which thoiigh spelt alike, have difFerenfcsigJ 
nilications. and the accent on different syHahlesj aa in the subsianJ 
tiv'C c'mlracty and the verb conira«/ ; or in the substantive minuKl 
and the adjective minute. But she long and the short are nf>uch useT 
ii. Latin dictionaries and graminars, a& also that which is called con 
mon, and the (^a) are much in use among French writers. 

CHAP. HI. 
OF ANALOGY. 

^^S^ BAT h analogy ?{ 

A. Jnalofru teaches us to know distinctly all the scvera 
parts of speech in the English Tocgue. 
Q. How many jonrts of speech are therQ ? 



1- 



f! 



TO THE SNGUSH TONGUE. 



10^ 



me of a short 



all the scvera 



A* Eight: viz. noun, vronouriy verb, pariicijplej adverb, eoxf^ 
motion, preposition, and interjection, 
^ .. n. • . ...OF A .NOUN. 
ijfc How many kinds of nouns are there? 
il. Two ; ,'d substantive and an adjective', 

OF SUBSTANTIVES. t 

Q, What is a. noun substantive f 

A. It is the name of any being or thing, perceivable eith^ 
hy the senses, or the uodeFstundiu^ ; as, a horse, a book, 
Q. How rpany .j|i;inds of noz(ra substantives are tkere? 
A» Two : proper and common. 
Q. What is a substantive proper ? 

A, It is die name of some particular person, creature, placc^ 

l^or thing ; as, one man is called Thomas, another John / one 

horse is called JoUi/, and another IVhitefbot : one ship is called 

th^ Lion, and another the iJea-Aor*e..* one place is called Xqii^ 

rdon, and another Bristol* 

Q. What is a substantive common j^ 

A, It is the name of every thing of the same kied and de*) 
.nomination ; as, a man, a dog, a, tree, 

Q» How many things belong to a noun ? 
A, There belong to a noun these seven things : numbe^ 
' jCase, gender, person, article, declension, and comparison, 
^ OF NUMBER. 

Q,, Wliat is number^ 

A. It is the distinction of one jTrom many^ 
Q. How many «M»n5er5 are there ? 
A. Two : the singular and the plural, 
<Q, How is the singular number known ? 
A. The singular number speakeiti but of .one-; as, a book, 
jQ,, How is the plural number known ? 
A. The plural number speaketh of more than one : as books* 
Q, Have all nouns txuo numbers? 

A, No,: some nouns, such as the proper names of placea^ 
have no plural ; as, London, York, &c. as also litne, slime, &c, 
others have no singular; as, ashes, beUotus, &c. and some few 
J8XQ used in both nuni^bers ; as, sheep, sxvine, deer, ^c, 

OF CASE. 
iQ. How many c«^w are thesre in a noun ? 
A. Six cases, singularly and plurally. 
Q. Which be tiiey ? 

A. The nominative, the genitive, the dative, the accusative 
ihe vocative, the ablative-^ 



w 



'A^ftw^tmm 



H^ 



;iS 



'%l. Whsit IS gender f <. 

A. Gender is the differeiKj« of'noiin8^il<icording to their mb.^ 
Q. How many ^a^TflflM^^are there ? * W" 

^' ^}i!!^'' ^^^''^''^^^fr^^^fefiiemneyHi^^ihe^nemA^- 

^ y/VhQ.tnoum wee o^itiemmitain& gender f 

A, AH J^orux^M the male. kMrmi^&Jatk^f a #o«^% ^or««i, 

Q. WT»t^notimw«eof the,j^fe»rf«^«^^^^^ * 

A. All»ou«^(rf'tlD^feiHaietod; as^*^ ww^d^i a db*U<^, 
Mmore, aitoness, a *'^* 

Q. What nouns are df the' nemer fended 9 ' 

A/ ^Ilnouns that are'nei4*i«^of lie inate^iorf^ittate Mndi 

SiM^ stu;kf or SL4tm04 * 

Qi Hav®^ all wo!aH».tb<^idistte*t»dn«^'^ ^ 

'^^ J**f*S ?^*<>»e«<Hin«,' common to botf* «exe», VhifcH ^^ 
.are called Epcene ; as, a ^joarroto, a ^ervojtf'/a ca^^ft rabbit,'^ 

A. By the hete^of gowae oth^ disth%ukhmg wordsr a« a 
.^ock'sparrouf, a hen-^arrow^ SLmcm^s&rvmO^ ^^'maid-s^ami 
a Ae-ca/, ^ ^e-ccty a he^mbbiti h she*^6bm'^ 

"i?. Jl»«re;»«-'- some word* wurcb, though tiiey b^ 6f .th«tw«t6r g<^ 
der.are often (by ru««^m) tiied as if they We of the w„*cii/«.f or 
/m»««« gem/tfr. For thus we -wy^ trf d^eisun: i?/* gobg forth i« 
from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the eiSs of it p" 

, Dut they have rebcU^^iaf^akit he^. ' ■ * 

OF PERSON,- 
^. How many persow belong t© a noun^f: 
A- There are thj^ee persons in both numbers j ^ho ft«^, who 
18 alwaywhe that^eakethJ; the'^ecojM/,' who isalwaysth6 per- 
son or thmg spoken to ; therrfj&ini^ who ig always tte pei?febn*or 
thing spoiien ofj 

Q. Give an example ? 

A Sir^ular, 1. /; %, Tkouofjmid;-3,He,S!he,'it,tbis,:^ndtbkt. 

"^M *'rl' J ** ^'^ °^^'"* • ^ ^'^0'> '^^^^ and those. 

Wote. 1 hat all uouns are of the third person, except I and ihou OS 
1/ttu. Ire and ye or you. 

OF THE ARTXCLES. ' 
Q. What is an article f 

A. It is a word set before a substantive, for the eleaifek" &ttd 
more particular expressitig of its case and siirnififcitibh* 
Q. How many articles are there ? 
A. Two : a or an ahd ^^g, 
Q*, When is a or «» used ? 



*0 THE ENGtJS^ TOWGUE. 



^l«f) 







-A, A or en is used in a general and unlimited -sense ; as, 
A man (that is, any man) shall Me commended acciDrdmg4o his 
tvisdom. An organ ^ that litany ofgan ) is the best «f ail oiker 
musicud instruments* 

JNpieJ. A i« ;used before a oonsooiwit ^'0# Ijefore a y&weL. 

Q. When is the article iAtf used? ,.^.y 

>4, J%« is »sed to -convej?^ certiMii idea of that fhing (^' 
|)erson spoken ,of; as, The man^ (of this Everyman J xk^io teach' 
eth the art ofitrne speUing, has dme fn&muck good. 

Note. Substantives proper have naturally no <artide8 set befare them 5 
except when some'wortl i$ ^uni^rstood ; at^the Thantesy tliai is, tfic 
river Thamesi the T^e^ that is, the river Tyne ; or else^ken h h 
Ude4 by way^of eminence ; as, Thk God ojfthe ffef^rtm. 
Q, 1)9 the adjectives, admit of any article 'before Ihem ? 
'A, They ^of btrt ft is by virtue of Some «ul)lstaftitive express- 
ed orUrtderstood ; as >4 good servant g?neriilly makies: a good 
master. They gatheredthe -good t^fishes} into Wi*^*^ but ca^ 
thebad dtmy, Matt7xiit4^. 

OF THE DECLENSION OF A N0OT. 
Q. ^VJjatis meant by the vord declension f *' ■^, 
"A, Heclehsioh is the variation of a word by cd^^. 
Q,, How arejioMw* declined or varied hy cases'^ ' ' 
^/••Ehtis-^ ■• -■••"'■ '■ v- ., 



Singidart 
Nam. A bo6k,> 
C5e»t. ' Of a book, 
Dat. Tea book, ' 
^c. f4?h^W5k, ' 
Foe. ''O book, 
j^ From 54 booik. 
■8irigut«r. ' 
Avhurch, , 
Of a church. 
To a churchj 
T>ie4t!hurch. 
O Chnrch, 
From a church. 



Cen. 
Bat, 

Voc. 
Abl. 
Kate. 



Plural, 
^fiom. Books, i'm> 
1 G«n. Of Books, 
not. To books, 
jicc lliebobks, 
Voc. OboiHcs, 
jibl. From books. 

■ ' PimiHil. 
Nom, ^Churches, «, i' 
Geh. Of churches,' 
Z)d*.'Tto churches, 
Ace. The chdrches^ 
Vot. O churches, 
Abt. From churcheji. 



m-- 



All h<^uos, vrhich make the plural number by the addiiion of Jj 



or es to rtie 'sluulai-, aie regular ; the rest are irregular : as. 



SingiUar. 

^e«k 'Of,a itivR, \ 
To a Tnan, 
The ma^, 
t> man.' 



^vl- ♦. 



Oi,?f!'j 



Nom. 

Gen't 

Iht. 

From a man, ijf= h; Wf gjji. r 

bte 1. Penni/y in the singuJarn^mbet, makes pieHce ia.tf^ pjt^rnl 
But frtnn^everal particularsUver coins, whiefc apeak thelfi^V' •> ^r ' 



Dat. 
, ./fee. 

j>rot 



rinrdt. 
M^n, 
Of men, 
To mep. 
The mpn, 
O rrie«^ 

From men. 



vllO 



L* ' 



A NEW CUIBE 



13 









llKi 



\l) 



ihe word pence h mad© a singular t^umber, and Its plural becomes 
penccs. 'illti*, In the singular number, we 8ay« one tix'pence^ one 
Jour'])fncet one ihrce-peneeyand one tum-penct ; Gut in the plural num« 
ber, two or more six']tenceSyfour-]>enci's^ three-penc^s^ and ^Ufo-pences. 
2. A penny ^bcn spoken of a silver penny ^ vnyMni pennies m the plufjU ; 
thus we Wy in^the singular nnmber, one silver yennffj but ilx th* plu- 
ral, two or more silver pennies. t ' ' 

OF ADJEGOTVES. 

- Q, What is an adjective f 

A, It is a word that expresses tbe quality or m^aer of a 
-thing ; as, goody bad^ great i small, ' .,..<' 

Q. Where is the acE;>cif/w to be placed ? 

A. Before ,jits Substantive ; as, a good boy. Yet spmetimes, 
when there ar€ more adjectiv4Js than one joined together^ or 
one adjective with other words depending on it, th^ aiijective 
may be set after the substaptive : as, A general hoihyv'i^ an^ 
valiant : A man skilful in numbers, 

Q. What do you observe of two substantives put together 
in composition ? i ' 

A. The first takes to .itself the na^turp of an adjective, and 
is commonly joined to the following substantive by a l^yphen ; 
as, a sga-Jish, -. ■. , 

Q. How are substantives and adjectives declined together ? 

A, Thus c 

Singttlar * PlurqiL 

Nom, A good boy, Nom. The good boyo^ 

Gen. Of a good boy. Gen. Of good boys, 

jDat. To a good boy, Dat. To good boys. 

Ace. A good boy, Ace. The good boys,. 

Vqc. Ogoqdlwy, Voc. O good boys, 

Abl. From a good boy, Abl. From gipod boys. 

OF THE COMPARISON OF ADJECTIV^ES. 

Q. What is mejuit by coOTjjarwon ? 

^, It i^ the yaiiation of a word by degrees, according to the 
quantity of its signification. 

a, Wftiat adjectives admit of compariifoti ? . ** ^ 

A. All ^ose whose sigpificatioii may increase or be dimi- 
nished f none else. 

Q, How many degrees of comparison are there ? 

A, Three : the positive, the comjoafatvvey and the superlative. 

Q, What is the positive degree f 

A, The positive degree mentioneth the thing, absolutely, 
T^ithout any increase or diminution ; as, longi shorty fvise, 

^ What iB the comparative degree ? ^ 

M. 'S^ comparative sdntewhat iittreiaseth oi* diriifnifeheth its 



TO TfiE ENGLISH TONGUE. 



in 



or be dimi- 



fmtive in signiiicatioii; as, longer y or more long; shorter y o.r 
more short ; wiser, or more wise. - ' ' 

Q. What is the superlative degree f ' 

A. The superiativc increaseth or diminisheth the significa- 
tion of iu positive, to the utmost degree ; as, longesty or most 
long; shortest, or most short ; wisest, or most wise. 

Q. Are all adjectives, that admit of any comparison, com- 
pared thus ? . 

A,- No. Same adjectives are irregular ; as, good, better, 
best ; bady worse, worst ;■ much, more, most ; httfe, /m, least, 

CHAP. IV. . .\-:,;^\:' 
OF PRONOUNS, 

^> Wf U AT ha pronoun? 

A. A pronoun h a part of Speech' that supplieth tlie place 
of a noun, > v ^-j, . . ; < 

Q. How many things belortg to a pronoun ? 

A, There belong to a ^ronoifw, number, case, sender, per' 
sen, and declension. • 

Q. How many kinds of pronouns are there ? 
A. Two t substantive and aidjective. 
Q. Which ^TQ^the pronoicn substantiveff ^ >. 
A. These; /; thou or ymi\; he, she,i^;^WSk\h^ rAm?ik, 
xae ; ye ov.^ouL; they; ' '^ 

Q. Which kte the pronouns adjective? 

A. My, mine, thy, thine, our, ours, yow, yours, t^ho, which, 
what,. this, thai, same, himself, herself, it-self, &c. 

Q. What is the use of these pronouns adjective ? 

A. By some a question is asked; as. Who teadheth me9 
What new method is this ? By others we learn the true pos- 
sessor of a thmg ; as, This /y my /^oo/f. By jiome we call ttf 
ramd something that is past . as, This is the book which [booki; 
L lent you. By others we demonstrate our meaning ; aa, What 
I said to John, the same / say to you ; Live well. 

Note. Pronouns have no articles before them, except for distinction 

Q. What pronouns are of the fir»t person ? 
A. / and we. 

y. What pronouns are of the second peYson ? 



iriirnifeheth its 



A. Thou or 



you, yc or you. The rest are of the third. 



lir 



A NEt7 ©riiJE' 






^ Jfow hi^c pronoun I d^clhied ? • 
A Ihus ; 

Singular. ^ Plural'.^ 

Nam, I, Nem. We, 

. Gen. Of me. G4n. Of us, 

^ jDat. To me, J5of^ To us, 

Jce. Me, >fec. Us, 

Vop, Is wanting, ■' Vac. In tranfing. 

Jfht. From Die. Jbl. Vvtnn \i», ' 
Qw.'IIow is the pronoun ihawori/ou deelmed ? 

A. Thus: . i w 

Singufar. Plural. 

Norn. Thou or you, Norn. Yeorjoi^ 

Oen. "Oftheeorofyou,. Gen. Of you, 



Dtit. To thee orto you. 


Pat, To you, 


Jcc, Thee or you, 


<<4fcc. Ye or ymi. 


I've. O til ou r yon, 


Fae. Oyf©ryo»fi» 


J ti. From t hee or from fot 


1. All, from voir* - 


Q^Hbw are the pronouns 


hSf she^ it,^ declined ? * 


y// Thus : - 


. : ' '■ . ■ \, 4,.l 


Singular. 


i. ■ 'pi. 


Nihn. lU, 


•<». > .. . . ' - • 1 1 


•Oew. Of hira^. 


r I . ^ .^ ■ J 


JD»t. To him. 


j ' ,' - 


j1<?c, Him, 




V&e. Is ttanHngyj 




Atlf From' h1». ■ 


Pkfral. 


Xmi. Sh^j - 


mm, Tfky. ' 


Geit, Of her. 


Oen, (Hilmm,'iO 


i?a#.- Toiler, 


Dei^ Toihem, '■ 


Ace. Her. 


Ace. Tbeni, ; a 
Voe. Is wanting.^. V 


Vac. I»\Dariting 


AMy¥xata\Mrf , 


.i&/^ FromthemT 


JVo«.W, 


■ ! ■ . •> ' 


G«». Of it. 


/■ ■; fi:.!^''' ^" ■ ■ " -' 


JDffftvToit. 


" ' ' "' i ' 


^ce. It; 




fcci /« -waniing^f 


■'..-. 


Abh From It. 


i . • , 


^^o<e. im, birrs, Us, and <A« 


fr*, befog prottottnt ynwgwirey ftre »^0* 


«iuemly oamI for Jie genitive ca 


mtolhe, 4he, it, and tfj«y* - 



CHAP. V. 
OF A VEnR. 

n. W^H^^T is a t'&>^ .' 

A^ A x^erb ka part of speech that betokeneth heihff : ttti. 
Hive : iloing > as, Ihve : or suffering ; as, I am 
Q, How many kinds of verbs &re there ? 
J, Three: activCr passive, SiXidne'idep.^ 



lovfi,^- 



TO tHE ENGLISH TONGUE. 



m 



(i* What is a verb active f 

A. A v(rd active is a verb that denoteth action ; but in such 
a' manner as to admit after it the- accusative case of the thinr 
It acts upon ; as, / loved him. ^ 

Q. what is a verb passive f 

A. \ verb passive UokenethmWerlng; aM, I am loved. 
Q. What IS a verb neuter f 

A. A verb neuter- signifies tHe state or being, and sometimes. 

?.LT.T'^v rr^-^'^""^^ btUhasno^noun afSrTt^ 
denote the subject o? actioni . 

Q. How many different ways is ^verb neuter expressed ? 
A. rw^ways: sometimes actively ; as, 7/^;,^, and so me^ 
Monies passively; as, /flwwc/^.. *^* «iUHunie. 

Q. How many things belong to a verb ?' 
A-. Four : mood, tense, number, and person.^ 

^ .x>u ^ OF THE MOODS. 

Q. What IS a mood t 

A. It is the mannfer by which a r^ri shows Its significatibnj 
Q. How may moods are there ? «""'S 

tJ^lF'! '' **^« ^'"f f"'^^'^^. the imperative, the op^a/iW, tlie «o. 
f«%/?fl/, the subjunctive, and the infnitive, » «^/?o 

Q. How are these »ioo^- known ? 

A. 1. Tjie zW/ca/?W,«oorf directly declareth a thinff true or 
^'f Vf' ^'•^'^^'.«^el««a«keth a question; a,,doIread? 
Mot ^'"^^'•''^^^^ '"^^^ biddethorcommandeth; i,rmrf 

#o«wTi!frf;''^''^''' '^^"'^ "^^^^ ^^^'•^^^^ ^«' ^ ^^'^^^ r 

^' The pofential' mood shoiivet)ip6v^et, or the want of it Y 

tfow/tf, or ught ; as, / crtn vjork or «%, just a» I please • Thhn 
^ouldphy, but his ma^^^r will norWhim. ^ ' " 

5. The subjunctive mood is conditional, havine al wava a onn 
junction jomed to it; ^,^ken T can love "c^^JTu^^lZ 

6. The m>///T;. moorf affirmethnothing, butsi«2thV' 
definitely ;. havmg neither number, nor p?;son, nSr noSna' 

lXTi:;'tXl;r ' ^-—^rkLwn by thi;:^,x 

Q. Of what do 7»<?o«& consist ? 
A. Of tenses. 

THE TENSB$'. 



t 



What is a tense? 

It i« the. distinction ox limok 



s .'1 



I 



n 






'inil 



If 



ii 



%H 



A tfJiW OUIUB V 



Qk HjOw many tenses arc there ? 

f/?rej^j/,l \C present tense, "" 

A^Threc : ^ poity > viz. ^ preterpetfcct iense^ and-.the 

l^tocome,^ {jutitre teme. 

There is also another division of tirqc after tW> manner : the nretcr- 
perfectUnte, i« subdivided into the proterimimjtct tense, or the time nor 
perfectly past ; and the pre teridujtorfect teme, or the time lonjf past. 

And to these m<y be added, what the Gceeks call a $econ J future. 

Q. Htow is the present tense known 2» 

A. It is known by the signs do, dost, does, doth, and speak- 
eth of An action now a-dojng but not finisJied ; as, J do read, 
that is,. / have not yet done reading. 

Q., How is the prelerpexfect tense k«ow«.? 

A.. It is knowa by these signs, have, hast^ hath, and Aoj, and 
speaketh of the time perfectly past, and of the action finished, 
without regard to any thing ejse ; as, I ha>ve read, or quite 
done reading. ^ 

Q. How IS the preterimperfect tense known ? 

A.' By the signs did and didst, and speakine; of the time 
^ast,. but shows that something was then a-doingbut not 
finished at that time which we speak of; as, I did read while 
1/otL.tvere at plai/, ' ^ 

Q, How IS, the preterpluperfect tense known ? 

A. By the signs had and hadt, and speaketh also; of the 
tiwe pasti and shows that something had been done before- 
aoother thing that was done and past.;, as, / had read an htur 
before I vorote my exercise, 

Q* How is the first /M/Mr<?^g»se known ? 

A. Ihe iixht future tense is known by the signs Ma// and 
tvill ; and speaketh of a short space of time to come ; as, / 
ix)iU read presently : You shall xorite to-morroto, 

Q. How is the second/zt/^/re tease known*? 

A. The secord future ten e is known by the signs. shall or 
mil herecfier, and speaketh of a long space of time to coin^» 
as, I shall read hereafter . 

OF THE NUMBER OF VERBS. 

Q. How many numbers are there in verbs^? 

A. Two : the singular and the pluraL 

m. How do you know tha numier of the verb? 



A 



12.. 

'J 



4.1. 



^l^^t AAA /l ^AA 



•1 aS/5 xiw^n^lutxYu CU&iI»v 



Q. Have all verbs numbers f 
A. All, but verbs of the infinitive mood, which have 
nwaiber, be causa they admit ®f n<» uomiaative case^ 



ITD 



TO THK EXGLlSIl^TONGUEi 



1 13 



OF THE PERSON OF VERBS. 

Ql How arc verbs otlierwi«e divided ? . 

vl. 'Into personals and imper.sonatsi 

Q. Vtihat is »%wrb personal? 

A, Any verb that will admit thepronouM, /, tkmt, he, sltc^:^ 
m their plurals, ur, ve, or Mey, hetbre it. ,. 

Q. What is a verb impersonal? • 

A, It \a an absolute vciby which hath only one person; and 1 
therefore can only admit of the pronoun it before it ; as, it I 
raineth : itfreezcthi it is hot :. it is cold ^ . 

Qi How niany kinds of mpersona/s are there? 

A, Two, active ; as, it rains : prtSbive ; f>8, ft is xvarm* . 
OF,THE HELPING VEUBSl: . 

Q. What is a helping verb ? 

A. It is a verb that is prefixed to another verb, to denote »r r 
^gnify: the time or the mood, or tlie manner of the verb, 

Q, Which are the helping verbs ? f ' 

A, Do, dost, does, doth, did, didst, have, hast, has, haih^ , 
had,.hadit,!'a}ill,'wilt^ .y,nll, shalt, may, maifst, can, canst, \ 
might, mighfst, would, xvoiddU, should, shciUdst, cofdd, couldst^ , 
might, oughtst, let, am, are, is, tvas, tvere, been, and he. 

See the formation of verbs both perst^ial and imparsoHal, through mo0d ,' 
and tense^ in the several pages followtng. • 

OF THE FORMATION OF THjR VERB ACTIVE 

TO EDUCATE. . 

Q. ConjugatetheverbActive,en^«cff/<',throu£'hitiood and tense. ', 
' A INDICATIVE MOOD, . 

Present '^T^'nTse,>. 

StNG. I educate ortio educate ; thou educatcst or dost edu- - 
©ate ; or you educate or do educate ; he educateth, educates, or 
doth or dofcs educate,-^PLun. We educate or do educate ; 
ye or you educate or do educate^; they educate or do educated , 

Preterperfect Teusc.-f 

Sing. I have educated-; thou hast or you have educated ; 
he hath or has educated.^^PL ur. We hdve. educated ; ye oi* 
you have educated ; they have educated, j. 

Preterimjterfect Tcuse.- 

Sing. I educated or did educate; thou educatedst or^id&t 
educate, or you eQucate<l or did educate ; he educated or did 

educated or did educate ; they educated or did educate. 

Prtrterytiuperfept Tmsv. 

SiN(?. I had educated j tltou hadst or you had educated j 



h'& 



A NKW CCIBE' 



III 

h 



'ti 






ill 



91 



I 



he hnd etUicuted — Plur. We haU educated { ye or you haU 

educated ; they had educated. 

Firji* FiUitrg T'nu. . 

^ SiNO. I shall or will educate; thou shalt or wilt, or you 

fr-iall or Will educate; he shall or will educate Pluh. We 

^ull or will educi^tc; ye or you shall or will educate ; they 
siiall or wiU educate.. ' 

Srcond Future Tcn»e. 
Srxtj. I shall or \riil educate hereafter ; thou shalt or wilt, 
or you shall or will wlucate hereafter ; he shall or will edu! 
oate hcreaaer.— Plur. We shall or will educate hereatb x 
■ye or you shall or will educate hereafter; they «hall or^iij 
oducate hiireufier.* 

IMPEU ATIVK MOOD. 

Sing. Educate thou; Ik hiui educate Plur. let U3> 

cklucdte ; educate ye ; let thjra educate, 

IJOTKNTIAL MOODl' 

Pres&nt Teiise, 

Si\(;. Fmay or can educate ; ihou mayst or canst, or yq^ 
may or can educate j he may or can educate. Plur. We 
may or can educate; ye or you may or can educate ; they 
may or can educate.' s 

Preterprrfect Tetin; 

StNG. I might or could have educated? thou mighut or 
oouldst, or you might or could have educated ; he might or 
oould have educated.— Plur. We might or could have edu* 
cated; ve or you might or could have educated ; thtv might 
or coiUd have educated.- 

_ ^ Pr,tefimf}erfect Tente.'** 

Sing. I might or could educate ; thou mightst or couldst, 
dr you might or could educate ; he might or could educate— 
Plur; We miglit or could educate ; y ; or y^m might or could 
educate ; they might .>i could educate . 

PreterpUperfect Tense. 

Sing. Imighr or could have had ediicated; tlioij mightst 
61- couldst, or you might or could have educated ; he might 
or could have had educated,—PLUR. We might or could have 
had educated ; yc or you might or could have had educated f 
t.U^.) * light or could have had educated. 

First Future Tense is wtiniingii 
Sccand Future Ttnse. 

Sing, imayor can educate hereafter; thou mayst or carist, 
or you may or cm educate hereatWr j h^ may or can edacatl 



fo THE ENOLISIl TONGUBt 



nt 



IScreafter. — pLun. We may or can educate hereafter ; ye or you 
may or can educate hereafter ; they may or can educate hereafter. 
Tht OMaliv€ Mood ii matte by prefiiing an adverb of wubinr to the' 
rolmttal Mood i .z», that I might educate, Ac. 

'llje Subfunctitre Mood u made by prefiiing i coi^^uncHmk to the P%te^ 
ttni Mo»d t .a>, Jfltauld fdHcaiit, 6cc. 

INFINITIVE MOOa, 

J Preient 7Vn<i/, To educate. 

». ' I'rttetjttrfect Tnij«, To hare educated.' 

I*reterimperfect TVtii^, ^ 

Pretrrptupe'rjkct IVnstf, and i are want I'nei 
First Futute 7VnM, J, 

Second 2'\tuni Tente^ To educate hereafter. 
Participle of the Present Tense, KducatiW. 
OF the; FORMATION OF THE VERB PASSIVE.. 
j^ TO BE EDUCATED. 

Q. How is the verb passive conjugated ? 
A. By the help of the verb am or de, and their derivative»- 
Q. Givetao example ? 

^ , t \1 : 1.4. INDICA^nVE MOOI>» 

■ ■ .■ I. ^ ;i y* " Pretent Trnte. ,%.;./-' 

Sing. I am educated ; thou art or you are educated; h« 
M edvicated. — Plur. We are educated; ye or you are educa- 
ted iMi^Y nss .educated. 

St NO. I have been educated ; fliou hast, or you h'$vp been 
educatedj.he hath or has been educated.— Pli; r. W^ have 
been educated ; ye or you have been educated. ; they have 
been educated. 
' t^^r Preterm]>erfifctTtnw.iyittt . *»^ , 

Sing. I was educated ; thou wast, or you was educated v 
he was educated.— Plur. We were educated ; ye or yoft 
were educated ; tbey were educated. 

Pretet-jitujKrfeft Tent*' i • . 

Sing. I had been educated ; thou hadst, or you had been 
%<iucated ; he had been educated.— Plur. we had been edu- 
cated ; ye or you had been educated ; they had been educated. 

First Future Tense. 

Sing. I shall or will be educated; thou shalt or wilt, ot 

you shall or wilf be educated ; he shall or will be educated ,. 

Plur. We shall or will be educated; ye or you shall or wjI>' 
be educated ; they shall or will be educated. 

Second Future Tense. 
kjixss... i oiiuii or wiii ue cuucittcu neretiltei' : iiiuu tihait ofei- 
wilt, or you shall or will be educated hereafter ; he shall or 
will be educated hereafter.— Plur. We shall or will be edu- 
cated hereafter ; ye or you shall or will be educated hereaf-- 
ter ; they «haU or will.be educated hereafter^, 



I 



lis 



A. NIEW OUIDB 



IMPERATIVE MOOD. 
MiJTG. Be thou educated ; let him be educated.-^pLyii Let 
us be eclucattd ; be ye educated ^ let tiiem be educated. 

POTENTIAL MOOD. T^^ 

^ Presrnt Tertw. 

5MNG. I may or can be educated ; thou mayst or canst, or 
you may or can be educated ; he may of 'can be educated.-. 
l-LUR. We may or can be educated ; ye or you may or caa 
be educated ; they may or can he educated. -^ -^ " 

„ T • r Prcttrperject Tense. 

Mng, Insight or could have been educated'; thou miffht«t- 1 
orcouldst, or you might or couM liave been educated; he 
might or couki have been eiucated—FLUR. We might or 
eoulu have been educated ; ye or you might or' k-ould ha-e 
been educated ; they might or could have been educated. 

. Prelerimperject T^nse% . 

Mng. I might or could be educated ; thou mightst brcould!»t 
or you might or conld be educated jheTnight .or; could be 
educated.-PLUR. We mighfeor caul^beeducated; yeoryou 
might or could ba educated • they might or could be educated 

MNG. 1 might w could liave had been educated ; tlK«?fcr«fl*tst 
•r couldst, or you might or could hav6 had been ^MtatMihe 
r.'fw K ' ''''^'\ ^^^^^^been edtoited.~PLUR. We mighi or 
fcoi^d have^Wad 1^ iedtkeat«^diye c^.you mightorcoullhave 
ftad^b^en educated jtheymig^tor douldhavehadbeetteducated. 

^ '■ ^^*st JFttfure' Tense is wcniling.. 

-J / Second Future Tense. 

Mng. I may or can bte educated hereafter ; thoutnavst or 
««tt8t, or youvmay^n- can be educated hereafter ; he may 6t can 
be educated hereafter>~PLUR. We may or can be educated 
hereafter ; ye or you may «p casn be educated hereafter ; they 
may or can be educated h^reaftef . . ^ 

P J^l-^ft^''"! ^ood is hiAde by pteSxi^g an akverb of whhihg to the 

INFINITIVE MOOD. - 

Pm^Mt Tar? se^ To, be educated. 
Preierperfect Tense, To have been educated 
PretenmjKiJeci Tense,- J 
Pretei-jHuperfecl Tert4^»and f are wanting. 
First Future Tense. \ 

t;kcond Future Tnise, To be educated hereaft^ 
FAftTi^aw.BX)!' the Prf-ior Ttfrtif, Educated. 



TO THE ENSLisri TONGUa 



119 



'/onto the Poten^ 



Q. How are verbs neuter formed ? 
jw.>v^ -4- INDICATIVE MOOD 

l^esenl Tntse,h mills nr>l»ii.«.j "*"wij. 

/Vej«r,w;)^/ec; n„,e, It rained or did rain. 
Preterplnpcr/ect Tense, It had:rained. 
Ffrst huture Teme, U shall onwfU ra^n. 
Second tntuTB Tense, U sl.«ii or will ra ii hereafter 

D . „■ POTENTIAL MOOD. -. 

trilerp^rjcvlTeme, It might or could liave raiii«: 
Pretertrnpcrfrcl Tense, II migh. or reuld rain 

THE INFIWTIVE.MoSd ,>««.„,/„.. 

Pre'f^^rp^r/ec^ T't^w.te, It Int'i or has been reported 
Pll(;^tn^perfect Tense, It wa. reported. ^ ' 

F»r*; ^«^„r<. Tense, It «i,all or will be reDort^d 

IMI Lll ATI VE MOOD Let it be reported. 

_ "oientiaI- Moon 

Pr..,^«f r^„,e, It may or can be reported.^ " 

^^'^^tr:' '* T'«''^ r ^"^^ ^'"^'^ ^««" '•«^«>rted. 
'reui « nt perfect 7eme, It might or could be r€Dorti.;j 

Til n f. ^'Tf' '^ '"'''y ^' ^a» be re.norted hereafter 
.j. ■ TUB INFimTIVE MOOD .>ta«.-,y. 



fkm 



A KEW eiumiB 



CHAP. VI. 

W OF THE PARTICIPLE. 
n-ATk A partidplef 
A, A mriiciple is a part of apeech derived from a veHj, 
; and signines betng, doing, stiffering, -and also implies tme, i^ 
a verb dees ; but is otherwise Jike a noun adjective. 
Q. How many joartjcip^* are there ? .. ^ 

A, Two; the active participle that ends m-ing ; as loving, 
, and the passive participle that ends in d, i, or n^ ,as, lovmj 
taught, stain* 



CHAP. vn. 

OF AN ADVEHB. 



>^. yV HAT is an adverb f 
A* An adverb is a part of speech commonly set before a 
yerb, either to declare and fix the meaning thereof, or to give 
rsome force and distinction thei'eto ; aS; jTAer^, is sorrow tvhere 
'there is pain. 

Q. W hich are adverbs^ 

A. Those following most commonly occur ; already, ahjoay$^ 

.iasyfisund0r,hyandby, by ox hard by, doivnwards, elsewhere, 

enough, ever, far off, hence, henceforth, here, hereafter, hereto* 

fo¥c, hiihcr, hovo, Jtoxv great, hoiv tiiany, hoxn much y indeed, nay^ 

never, no, not, now, nowhere, (ften, <fientimes, peradventure, 

perhaps, rather, seldom, then, thence, there, thither, to-day, 

tO'tno^'Tow, very, ujmard, when, whence, where, xt^hither, yea^ 

yes, yesterduy, yesternight : also all such adverbs 'va.ly, as are 

^lerived from adjectives; sls, jusdy, wisely, truly, prudently 

bravely, &c. and all ordinals; as, once,. fwicefthrice^f our times^ 

fve. times, &Q, ^^^^^ 

CHAP. VIII. ^" 

WOF A CONJUNCTION. 
HAT is conjunction? 
A. A Gonjunction is a, part of speech that joins words an^ 
sentences together ; shews the reason of a thing, ox lays the 
subject under a condition. 

Q, How many sorts of conjunctions are there ? , , ^ 
A. Many; but the chief are cop?i/a^ve5, disjicncivoes^aiU'' 
sals, and conditionals. 

Q. What js the use of the conjunction copulative? 

;_; i-_».i- it- _ j_ I iL - ^ _^ -_4.__-_^ ■ 

lud Peter plays, . 

tiat is the ufle of a di§unctifcet .' 



A 
^1. 



i.1 



'I ■ 



Td THE EJ?G1ISH TONGUE, l^i 

Q. What is the use of a causal 9 

(^ What is the use of a conditional ? 

Q. GiVemeahstofthe:pttna>aIconiuctions? ^ 
^. Alsoy (^^houghy and, as, btcauSe, but, either, excm for 
howsoever, jf, Uei^ise, moreover, namely, neither neve^ielZ' 
nor, or, othenv^e, save, since, that, therefore, iheteiipon! unless 
whereas, x^herefore, vihether, i^hith^.. ^ ^^^reiipon, mtess, 

I I - " ij 

CHAP IX 

«• TT MAI IS a preposition ? 

A. A prepodtion is a part of speech reeularlv set before 

A. Alexander traveUed into Persia ; here into is the orrno. 
■«feo« separated from the «„„„, but in this, TheconSn 

5epa«E^? ""^^ '^ y'"' ^'^ *'"= i.ny<«i(,™ that stands 

y/. It is called ff;7^o«>/o« ? 

^ rJ^jr^ii ^'''' ^^"^ ;''•^>«««V/o;^ which is joined to tfie noun ? 
^. It IS called composition '^ ^'^xiuuu. 

5* ??^^^ ^^^ the;;r^^o,2Vw>r^ set separate, or by apvosition 9 

A, They are these that follow : abZ, about, IfZZ^aZ^ 

ll^ng or anwngst, at, before, behind, before oriTZes^Tof 

beneath, belou, between, betwixt, bemrd nu fhi/Zf k ^' 

fhro^^. beside,for,from, in,i^o,T:^^^ t g; ^L^' 

to4JonTy: '^'''' whidiare proper to the''Engl.sh 

aJ*/;'^!"'? is used for on, or 2;e ; as, afoot, for ort /oof • a 
bed, eormbed: thoughit issQinptf,v.«c,i.-C„,i.,'„. onjoor, a 
tot bide, a'hiai'^. fnr .;.;,;.« r ~ "" ^^^^i^^^a, ; ds, maOiUif 



bide^ a'ioake, for wft/ce. 
2. Be, which is used for abuut 



as, in besprin/cle, i. e. to 






ar ?z;():4 



m 



A ^EW GUIDE 



fi 



il^e side / for in ; as, betimes ; u c. in time or eartif : for he* 
J'orc i as, to hesfeak^ i. e. to speak for^ &c. 

S. Counter^ which signifies opposition, or contrariety ; as» 
c^Tijiterbahnce, counterscarp, counterfeit. * 

4. For, which signifies negation, or p'ivation ; as, tojbrbid; 
to forsake. 

J). Fore,, which signifies ie/bre ; as, to Joresee to JbreteL 

is. Mis, which denotes defect or ^rror ; as, misdeed, mis^akei 

7. Owr, which signifies eminency or superiority ; as, to 
<ca'^/co»ii^» Jo oversee. It denotes also exc^** ,- as, overhasty. 

8. Om/j which signifies excess^ excellency, ftr superiority / 
»as, to out-do, to out-run, out-tvit, 

9. Un, which denotes negation, and contrariety ; as, wn- 
pleasant, umvorthy : also dissolution ; as, to unsay, to wwrfo- 

10. 1//3, which denotes wo/foM upwards, or places wad things 
that /i'e upwards ; as, upland, upside, 

11. SMr, which signifies on, over, or upoM, derived from the 
^atin £u^£r .* as, surface. 

12. /K?VA, which signifies against, or opposition; as, to 
UMtth tand, \. e. to ^fawt/ against. Sometimes it signifiesy>ojw 
or /-if' ; as, to 'wish-kold, to mth-drato^ 

Q. Which are the prepositions, in composition borrowed from 
the Latin? 

A. 1, A and ab, whose natural signification is from, of, and 
pit of} but compounded with an English wor^ serve either 
to denote excess / as, about, afore, abhor, abuse, abroad, or else 
to signify separation ; as, to abstain, to abolish. 

2. Ad, which signifies to or at ; as advocate, advent, adverb, 

8. Ante, which signifies ie/^re ; as, antecedent, to antedate* 

4. Circum, which signifies about, as, circumlocution, circumr 
iHiUation, circumscribe. 

5. COi col, com, and con, for cmw, signify toith, or together i 
iis, copartner, colloquy, commerce, convocation. 

6. Contra, whicn signifies against, and denotes oppositiom 
or contrariety ; as, to contradict. 

7. Z)^, which signifies a kind of motion from ; as, decantf 
detract, deduce, and so is properly used to extend the sense 
p£ a word ; as, to demonstrate, to deplore. It also denotes 
contrariety ; as, demerit. 

8. Di, which serves to extend, stretch out, or lessen the sense] 

^c A^j 1 rj. •_ 1 1 :xU . _/-• A j^'„-.'„-'-r jzi^*^ 

(Ji UiC tVV^iU i\i is (JdiiiJUUiiUwU iVitlJ « i«S, iii7VSi-, ii*itii'ii'iSft, iiiiiiit^r 

i>. Dis, which signifies separation, difference, or diversity, 
iaiyutg a signification contrary to the primitive usage of u» | 
li m( is compounded with ; as» to disagree, to kUsoiar^te* 



borrowed from 



lessen the sense 



to TfiE ENGLISH taNGUE^ 
i-O. E or exy' wHich signifies out; out of ^ or off 



i^ 



"cn sigmnes out, out of, or off ; as, event 
die falling out ; to eject y i. e. to cast out ; to exclude ; u e. lii 
Cutout.'- 

11. £x/rfl, which signifies bei/ondy over, anik above ; as,>xi 
travagant extraordhmri/, 

12. /n or m, ^hich' generally denote the position or (/i'swo- 
«iV/on, or an action whereby one thing is, as it were, put into 
another ; as, to import, to impale to inclose .• or the impression 
whereby the thing receives such and such a form ; as, to inchanl, 
to incline. It like^vise deiiotes want or imperfectiilm •; as, to im • 
^lore, importune, impovHrfsh, imi^air, impotent, &c. greatness or 
largeness ; as, immense, imnlensity ; likeness, as, imitate, imita- 
Hon: unchangeableness; as, imniutable: piirity; as, immaculate i 
I. e. unspotted: hindrance ; as, impede : i. e. to stop : force ; as, 
to' impel, i. e. to drive forward, - accusation ; as, to hr^peach : 

rived from the I P"?.^ ' ^y imjisriom : violeiice ; ns, impctuo^Ls : confiaemen'e; 

di^ immure; u e. to shut tip between two wdU. - It is also u^ed 

at the beginning of words, to denote privation, or not : and 

gives a contrary sense to the word it is compounded with ; a», 

indecent, inhuman, injustice, imprudent, imperfect, impenitent. 

Also,in one word where in is^changed into ik as, ignoble. 

Note. In words derived from the French, instead of in, we common- 

IJU99 in ;'M, to enrn^, to encourage} but then it never denotes 

privation, or not. ^ 

13. Inter, which signifies between s aa, to intervene, to inters 
mpt :h\xt in interdict, it signifies as much as /or.inTor^irf.- 
sometimes we use enter, in words derived from the French. 

14. Intro, which signifies within ; as, to introduce, 

15. Ob, which signifies against ; as, obstacle, to oppose, 

16. Per, which signifies through : and denotes a certain 
degree of excellence or excess, as, perfect, perforate, persecute. 

17. Post, v<rhlch signifies after ; as, Postscript. 

18. Pre, whidi sigiiifies before; as, to premeditate, tdpr€=^ 
engage, preface, 

19. Pro, which signifies J^r or/orM ; butithasalso.agreiit 
many other senses ; as, to profess, protect, pronounce, prorogue, 

20. Preter, which signifies rto-rt/«A/ ; as, preternatural, 

21. Re, which generally impiies a repeated ac^WM ; as, to 
repeat, rechange. Sometimes it denotes opposition; as, to 
y^^ulsej BometimQ^ it denotes only the enlarging the sense of 
-jiie shtipic vCTu ; us, repose, repaU : soiuetlnies it signifies the 
chaAgmg one thin^ or state into another ; as. reduce, reduc* 
tton: sometimes it denotes contrariety ; z^, reverse : some^ 
times honour and esteem ; as, regard, respect : and sometiin^fe 
a^like and disesteom ; as, reproach, releti, rcjectiom 



A 



lU 



A NEW GtJIl^Z 



M 



I > 



ie> 



21. .S?^ which s!gnifififtM„^^r; as, tosubscrihe, ■. 

26. ^;^jo^r, iv^ich signifies upon, over, on above; as, super* 

.27. Tr«W5, which signifies over or %onrf,. as, to transpori, 

to <r«7z^^rm , sometimes it signifies the movii^ from one 

place ta another ; as to tramplant, to transpose J somethn^s^ 

t denote^ th. changing of one thing into ano her; as, to 

theiisS]'?^^^^^^'^^^'^^"'^'*'"* in Ci>w/j05«Vw«i derived from 
ana^i^' whicU signifies frivatLn otnot; as, Yw^n^wowi. 

2. /imp^i, which signifies w ItaJi sides wd flisM^y .e», am- 

phpQuSy amphitheatre, amphibdogu. 

4. %;,«r, which signifies overmA nbox^ . ««, huperbole. 
f* S?'''' 'rl^'^'M^g'?'fie« ^«»^^^.; as, hypocrLm. ~^ ^ 
6. ^^e^a, winch signifies beyond^; or else denotes the diang. 
mgofonethingmtoaiwther; as, metaphor, metamjrphosik 
ft f^'^'Jjhich signifies oioM?; as, periodical, mripheru^ 
8. -S^«, which, signifies v^ith or i^g^er j m, sj0qI syntajc^ 

CHAP X 

r> WTvi A -T>^^ "^^ INTERJECTION, 
H-- f ? HAl IS amnterjection? 

M An interjection is a part of speech, whieh denoteth a 

sudto passion of the mind, without the help of aether 

wimte-: ^^d therefore inte^jecf ions are as various as the sudden 

passions ofthe mind themselves.? as, Ho, brave bous! here is 
?iexi>sfor ipu ! ^ ? 

^. \^iMch are the zWr/^c^/,!>nj f 

«vfS^'T/f.'''^'"?,^'f ^•'"'^ of them: o^ / «/«,>t/ alas! 
nu^ay hfir r/bk good lack ! good sir ! ha, ha, he ! ha ! heigh } 

' / ';r, *T"^^ /^'W/ /♦W5/* .' /wtr/ U: Oh i O brave f 
Osfrm^er Oho! pish! shuh! sirrah! scho ! tush! mil 
done ! ^'U. .said A vahoo ! xm ! 



r&TltlE ENGLISH tONGUE. 



l^ 



ovef aS) super' 



I derived from 



CHAP. XI. 
OF THE DERIVATION OF WORDg. 

Q,. V? HAT is the derivation ofutords? 

A. It shows how every ^-ord- may be formed in its propter 

chscy moody tense^ and qnality, 

Q. How 16 the genitive case singidar formed withoat tho ^ 
preposition o/piefixed? . t 

A. By putting 'j to the substantive of thp pmsessor ; fts, 
i/ie master s eye, i. e. The eye qfthe master makes tlwhorsefyt. 

Note 1. That the /)owemr or the thing /ww^w^fl' with this termination V: 
may be accountetJ eitfier a SHhsianiive of \.hfi gemime singular, or an 
tt^eciive poisessive ! as, My master's son, where master's is slo ndk-c- 
Uve jmsessive ; which may be properly rendered othesrwise, br the^ 
geuetive case. The son of my master. ■ 

2; It must nevertheless be carefully observed, that th« single wadded 
to the end of a wiDrd, which before ended in e does not make 8och a 
word zgeniMe case, or an adjectiee jmssessive; neither does it add 
any syllable to the word j for the e to wliich it is added, i» ca^ RW4y- 
Ift the pronunciation, and the *only adds tc the number of that word, 
and IS sounded together with the last consonant thereof; as in thf- 
words share, shares ; trade, trades ; spade, spades, &c. except where 
ihs word^ end in ge, as cage, cages t or se, as case, cases ; or ee, as 
face, laces. # » 

Q. How are wrds derived from oth&r parts of speech ? 

A. Many substantives, and sometimes adjectives ;■ and some- 
times the other parts of speech become verbs, by prefixing the 
sign to before them, or by adding che tennination en to the 
adjective f as, from & house, comei^ to house } from tt?om, to 
u;arm ; from hard, to harden. 

Q. Do not substantives come sometimes from verbs ? 

A. Yes: almost every vero has some substantive coming 
from It ; for by the addition of er to the ending of the present 
tense, comes a substantive signifying the agent or doer, which 
h therefore called a verbal noun; as, from to hear, comes a 
hearer ffvom to carry, &. carrier. 

Kote. Some mhstantives are formed from verbs, by the addition of or 
to the ending of the present tense ; as, from to grvem comes a gtmr^ 
nor J from to solmt, a iolicitor ; from to pisH, a visitor ; . from to ;>o»- 
sess, a possessor ; from to sail, a saitor /from to vend or stsi/, a w?n- 
«for ; also from to contribute, comes a contributor ; and from to swrwW 
a SMTwyor, dropping the e; » 



/I 



A mt\ M.r\^ ^J2^^ 



a.\. - 4.: 



i>wm«^«,.*m,e t^^atUCU II (/111 itfC/ 



^ V t r.- J V t . lannves 

A. Yes : 1. By adding the termination y, are formed 



^^tj^i^ of plenty or of abounding ; as, from Aea/M 



from wealih, ivealthy, 



adjec' 
ceuaes healthy, 



ij2 



126 



A NEt\r <;tn6'H' 



sia-nlfP^fb. S ^"^ ^^i"^^'?^ ^^^ are formed adjectives, thai- 
TIL ^* T^'' ?'^ ^^ ^^'^^ ^"y *'"5 '« made ; as, from 

^*f an oaken stick, a kirchen broom.' 

nnfln^fuf^'"'^ the tennmation>/; are formed ae/;Vrf,W.t, de* 

Jul; tromsm, smftarBlso, from to ahash,hashfitl lo. 

4-. Ky adding the termination some, are formeil adjectives. 
denoting much the same ; as, frotn ,frof«<5fe comt's i^r^^Kfecm,^, 
trorn.^««,(-, ^flwwr^o?n<.r&c. though sometimes the e fa left oat 

nJfft,^ . "^ ^*'®.^^'*"'*"^'''" ^'^'*' are formed adjectives ^m'. 

nif^wg «u<rn^ ; as. from roarf A comes worthless ; from ^ie/l 

iielpless i ftoni^ tooth, toothhss, Ac; -^^ 

Note. ITie snme tfijng is a!«o st^fnified bv Jin m or /« -nr<.fir.^ »^ 

6. iiy adduig the termination ly, are formed adjectives, which 
denoteMenm; as, from man, comes ma../y; ILgoZr^^ 
fyf also from 10/^ comes//^^,. ftom certain, certainhlc. 

7. By addiffgthe termination ^./i, ^re fortned afe/i^v, de- 
noting the same thing • a«, from tc.^ comes xjjiish r from 
f^ftMduh; skeep, sheepish. Sec aho £rom io/c, come$ 
bLokish ; and from to tickle, comes ^/cyt/i*//. 

n.Ll; • ^"^r '"^^''^.'''""^ Uy adding the same termination, are famed 

- 2. Ther*are»l*o^iomeflat;onalnameswhfch endin^t/,; a- Enxlisb 
Spctnuh^mru^h S<c. and in ic ; a,, Brituunic, Gcr^nanicXlf" 

; naatives ? '''^'' '^^^ i^eans are words derived fmn their pxii- 

^. % adding .,;,/;,,. .,/ow2,-r/c^, -to/c*,. -«^^., -7,^^^, ,kood. 
.1. Words ending yi,Aip denote t22^^^^^^ employment, or co«.. 
f^^/W7^,• &s, stexvardship,jy.lomhip, lorclshzp,.&(^ 

2, Words ending in .rf<tt«, signify r#c^ orc/mr^^ with pouter 
anA,diimimon or without them ; a^, popedom, kwgdom : \ho, 
hey signify the state, condiiion, quality,. property, and place, 

;n whicli-a person exercises hi* power ; ^,freedSm, thraldom, 
innoredomytotsdom, dukedom, 8cQ.:>. 

3. Words- ^^iding in -rick, ^nd .mck, denote office and do^ 
mimon ; as, bphopnck, bailiwick, • 

Note, .ment and a^e are purely French ferminationa, and have the 
*.me meaning wuh us as with rhem. and s, arcely ever occur but iff 
words derived /rom that language ; as. commandment, usaae. 
*, ouUMives eamiig in -nm, signify the essence o£ the 
thhig ; and are formed irom adjectives ; as, from xvhite, com«^ 
ymtiotsss, from hard, hardness, &c. 
Nate, These arc. calliJd a/?«droc<v>tf»r?*». 



TO TliE KNOtlSil'.TOKGrE. 



l^?Ut 



r m, .prefixed f 



Jr. Nouns that end in -head and -Aoorf, denote the ttate, con> 
dttion, and quality oi a thing, or person : as, godh<^ad, mal^ ^ 
hoody xvtdotvhvod, brotherhood, Mudihood, &G. 

mon/A, &c. also from to die, comes Ucat/t; from ^r.w, grcwlh- &,o. 

o ^w^^.^^ SUBSTANTIVES DmimjTlVE. . 

fimned, to Wn the sense. o£ its primativo umd; crs; (W- / 
*«»A, conies /c;«<&^/«, whicL is a Lttle ia^iS. 



CHAP. XII. 



■?• 



WOP'TH 
HAT is syntax. 
A, It is the disposing of words in Uieit right case, Mender'* 
number, person, inood, tense, and j^ce i» a switence. 
C^. (jive an example ? 

A. Good boy^are mt bnaiert. Herei the words are placed 
•according to syntax^ whereas should^ I say, Beaten not are 
boys good, -It w^ld bcunintcUigibl^ , becaiie^ here is no sm- 
tax in this sentence. •^ * 

Q,' How many kinds' o£ s^tencet are there ? ' 

A. "Two i simple and compound,^ . 

Q. What is a symple- sentence ?- ■ 

A. It is that wherein tliere is but on© verb, and ohe nomi- 
native^wofd ot the wibjeft, cither expressed or understood • 
as, The boy reads, ■ . 

Q. What ia a compound sentience ?^ " 

A, It is two^imple sentences joined together ffy a coniuia- 
tion or by a relative ; as, xiho, u^hich, that; or by a compare, 
tive word ; as, so, as, such, so many, as Many more than; as, 
I ^ diligent and you are negligerU. He is a naughty boM 
WW deserves correction, , a ^ ^ 

Q, What do^'you mean by a nominative word ? . 

^. The word that goes before the verbs ; and answers to the 
^question tvho or t^hat ; ■ as, Boys play, Where it may be aaked^ 
Who do play f Answer, Boys, 

.. , „.^ .,..-=rr — utiT^ i-as*. vi '<s,'ii£\i.\vLiwreiy9 aO Deiucti the 

verb . '' • ° 

A, Yes ; except when a question £s asked, and then the 
npnuiiat/ve case follows the verb, or more commonly the sign 



r^8 



A' NEW GUIDE 



a- 



of the verb ; as-, Did John go to London ? Do I ne^hct my 

(l What is the congtruction of the verb with the noniina- 
trve word ? 

^A. I'hc verb must be of the «ame number and person with 
tli'j nominative word; as, I stand i tkon dandest s-hcstandcth: 
uvt J f;ta/}dest ; thoil dandeih j he stand. 

Q. Is-the nominative case to the verb always n substantive ? 

A, No ; sometimes the infinitive mood stands for the nomi- 
DHtive word ; as, To lie is shameful : and RoniMink's a whole 
C^nm-B aforegoing ; as, To rise hetimes int/ie morning is the 
moat wholesome thing in the tvorld. 

Q. U two or more substantives singular come together, how 
jJiust the verb be put ? 

A. In the plura] immber ; as, Peter and John fight. 

Q. What number is the verb put ir> when it IbiioWs a noun 
of multitude ? 

A. It may be put in the plural, when circumstances abso- 
lutely determine the case to be more than one ; but it is most 
0brnmealy of the fiingular number ; as,. 2'he multitude is veru 
uoisi^. The heap is removed. 

({. Of what case roust those PO^ns be which follow verbs, 
and are governed by them ? 

A. Sometimes the genitive'; a», Take pity of me : sometimes 
the dative ; as, / gave a book to the master: and son^etimes 
the accusative ; as, / love mif mmtev, 

Q. What is the construction of tlie vocative ? 

A. The vocative is no part of the sentence, but only the 
person to whom the sentence is addressed? nnd is always of 
the second persoa singular or plural ; as, John / tvhcre have 
yoii been, thxit you have stayed so long f Ladies ! xxhu do ye not 
mind yoip' xvriting. *" .' 

Q* Of what is the ablative case governed ? 

A. The ablative is always governed of some preposition ex- 
pressed or understood ; such as, m, xvhich, through, for, from, 
by, and than : a«, lie took it from mfi i- lie ivent xvi'th you, 

CHAP. xm. 

WOF TRANSPOSITION. 
HAT is tran<;t}n^ifinn. 9 



A. It is the dI 



fender tbo sound of them 



placing of words out ( 

more agreeable 



their natual prdler, to 



to the 



ear< 



TO THE ENGI4SH TONGUE, 



im 



2 together, how 



EXAMPLE. 

It cannot be avoided, but that scandali will arise, and dif* 
fcrcnces will grow in the chwrch of God, so long as there is 
wickedness on earth, or malice in liell.. 

TRAN8POSED. 

It cannot be avoided, so long as there is wickedness on oailhi 
or nnlice in hall, but that scan dals^ will arise, and diilureno#9 
will grow in the church of God. 

Note. Where the natural order of the words h stmioth and grateful to 
the ear, they ought not to be transposed, unle«s in poetrvi.aa^ 
there only, when the necewhy of the verte requifef U, 

■ ■ ' ■ ' • . 

CHAP. XIV. 

WOF THE ELLIPSIS. 
HAT kttneHipsis? 

A, The leaving out of words in a sentence.. 

Q. Upon what account may words be left out ? 

A, 1. When a word has been mentioned just before, 4iBd^ 
tntiy be lup^ospd to be kept in mind . Therefore, in a relative 
sentence, the antecedt^nt or foregoing word is seldom repeat' - 
ed : as, / hmtg}d the boaJcg, nohi-h [books] / read, 

2. WFwn any word is to b(? immediately mentioned, if it can 
SS weii imdetstood, it ought to he leilt xmt m the fonncr part ^ 
as, Drink ye red [wine] or white m-ne f 

S. When the thought it empressed by some oSlker means ;• 
as, pointing to a roan, you need not say, W:ho i* that man f 
but Who is that ? ^ 

4. . Those words which, upom the mentioning of others, must 
needs be supposed to be meant^ may be left out:; as, IVhen 
you come to SUPatd's [chuch], then turn to the left [hand]* 

5. Thing and act, are frecjuently left out when they may be 
understood ; as, It ilhard [i. e. a hard thing] to travel through' 
the sniiv. It is tasy [i. e, an easy thing ssx act] to do so, 

6. The conjunction that is often left out in a corapoural sen* 
tence ; as, / deuce [tbat]^oM taould x^ritefor me. 

7. The relatives, that, which, tvAo, ukom, may be left out ; 
us, There goes the man [that or whom] / beat yesterday » J^ 
this the man ye spoke off i. e, ofvohom ye spoke f 

8. Sometimes a whole sentence is feft out ; as, It is our 
duty to pay a respect and deference, as to all those that are 
virtuons and coumgemis ; j<? [it is our duty to pay a respect 
and deference] to those alsQXvho bear an^ioj^ice or command its 
the state. 



1^ 



A'KEW OUIOB 



A. 



\l\ 



it- 



or Ang. Answer 
A. B. Artium BaccaUureuu, 

Bachelor of ArU 
Abp. Archbishop 
Abr. Abraham 
Acct. Account 
A, D. Anno Domini, fn the 

Year of our Lord 
Adml. Admiral 
Adrnrs. Administrators 

A. M. Artium Magister, Mas- 
ter of Arts : Ante Meridian, 
before Noon : & Anno Mun- 
di, in tlie.year of the World 

Amst. Amsterdam 
A nab.- Anabaptist ■ 
Anth. • Anthonj^ 
Apt Apostle* 
Apr. Aprii 
Ai8s<». Asfigiv*'^ 

Ast. P. G. C. Astronomy Pro- 
fessor of Gresham College 
Attov Attorney 

B. A. Bachelor of Art» 
Bart Baronet 
Barth.' Bartholomew 
B, D. fiiccalaureus Diviiiitatij, 

Bachelor of Divinity ^ 
Benj. Benjamin * 
Bp. Bishop 

B. V. Blessed Virgin 
,fiucksv Buckinghamshire^" 

C. Cent. Centum, an Hundred 
Cant. CmiiQlos, CanH^ury 
Cap. Captaifk 
Cat. Catechism > 
Chap. Chapter 
Chron. Chronicles 

VAt. f^ifltzpn O'av n.V^JUl 

tier. Clericus, Clergyman 

Clem. Clement 

Cef: Of Coinp. , Company 



CHAP. XV 
OF ABBUEVlAt'lONS. 



Col. Colonel, Colosslans. 
Com. Commissioner 
C'orn. Cornelius 
C. P.S. Cufittjs Privati SigtllL 
Keeper of the* Privy Seal 

C. S. Custes SigiHi, Keepct 
of the Seal 

Cr. Creditor* 
Cur. Curate 

D. in Number, 500 
Dr. Doctor, Debtor 
Dan. Daniel % 

D. D. Doctor DivinitatJ^; 
' Docto# of Divinity 

d. denarius, a P^nny 
dd. delivered 
Dec. lOber, Decemb*^ 
Dep. Deputy 
Devon. Devonshire 
Detit. DeuteroQomry: _> 
Do. Ditto, the same 
Dukra. Dukedom , 
Earld. Earldom 
Edm. Edmund 
Edw. Edward 

E. ^. Exempli gratia, bm foj^ 
Example 

Eliz. Eliaabeth 
Eng. Englandy Engli 4 . 
Ep. Epistle 
Eph. Ephesians'' 
Esa. Isaias 
Esq. Pilsqiure ' 
Ex. Example 
Exc. Exchange 
Exr. Executor . 
V^-s^m- Exeter 
Feb. February ■ 
Ft. France, French, Francis | 
and r ranees 

F. R. S. Fellow of the Eon>| 
iSociety "^ ' ' 



TO THE £KOLmi TONCUR* 



i9$, 



Oal. Galatiani 

Gen. Gent>8i8 i , 

Genl. General "^ 

Gcnmo. Gentralbsim* 

Gent. Gentloiimn 

Geo. George 

Go«p. Gospel 

G. k. Georgiiu Rex, George 

the King 
Grog. Gregory 
Hants. Hampshire 
Heb. Hebrews 
Hen. Henry 

Hier. Hieronymus, Jerom 
Honble. Honourable 
Hbnd. Honoured 
Honrs. Honourg 
Hdld. Holland 
Ibid, ibidem, in the same place 
Hum. Humphrey 
fiund. Hundfed 
I. in Number, 1 
Id. Idem, the same 
i. e. id e6t> that is 
J. H. S. Jesus Hominum Sal 

vator, Jesus Saviour of Men 
Isa. Isaiah ^^ 

Ja. James r 

Jac. Jacob 

J. D. Jurium Doctor, Doctor 

of Laws ' ' ' 

Jer. Jeremy, Jerom 
Jno, John "■ ' ^ 

Jos. Joseph 
Josh. Joshua 
Kn^'. Kingdom • 
KV, Knight 
tit in Number, 50 
lid. Lord 
I. liber, Book, & librae, Founds 



vvtit'A^Aa^r 



Lady Day 
't<ev» Leviticup 



Lieut. Lieutenant 

L. L. D. Legum Doctor, Doc*. 

tor of Laws ^ 

L. S. Locus Sigilli, th^ Place 

of the Seal 
Loud. London 
Ldp. Lordship 
Mom. Morning 
in. mauipulus, a handful 
M A, Magister Artium, Mas^ 

ter of Arts 
Ma. Madam 
M. B. Medicioie BaccalauretUk 

Bachelor of Physio 
Mty. Majesty 
Mar. Marck 
Marm. Marmaduke 
Mart, Martin, Martyt 
Mat. Matthew 
Math. Mathematics 
Messrs. Gentlemen 
Middx. MjUmes^^ 
M. D. Medjd^»4'Poctor, Do<%* 

tor of Physic 
Mifh' Michel, Michaelmas 
Min. Minister 
M.JS. .Memoriae Sacrum, Sa* 

cred to the Memory 
Mr. Master 
Mrs. Mistref^ 
MS. Manuscript 
MSS. Manuscripts 
N. Note 

Nat, Nathaniel, Nativity 
N. B. Note Bene, Mark w^ 
Nic Nicodemus, Nicholas 
n. 1. non liquet, it appears nel;- 
Nov. or 9ber, NovembfT: " ' 
N. S. New Style 
Num. Number 

\Jiit V/DjccmOu 

Obt. Obedient 
. Pet. or Sbei^, OOober, 



im 



^lsrEw*'G^H)E 



'■'?i*f' 



O. S. Old St54e 

Oxon. Oxford 

■Par. Parish 

-Pari* ParliameMt 

Pent. Pentecost 

'Per Cent, per Ci^ntWH, byvtJte 

Hundred 
Pet. PettJT 
Phil. Philip 
l*hiiora, PhilomatlwMj aXovor 

of Learning ; or, Philoma- 

thematicus, a Lover of tke 

Maihematiofi 
P. M. Post Meridian, Aft«r 

noon 

P. M. G. Professor of Music 

at Gresham CoUege 
Prof. Th* Gr* Professior of Di- 

vinity at Gresham College, 
P. S. Postscript 
Ps. Psalni 

Q. Question, Querai 
<i* di quasi dicat, as if be 

should «ay 
q. I. quantum libe*, as ,mucb 

as you please 
q. 8. quantum »ulficit, a -suffi* 

cient quantity 
Regr. Register 
Reginit. Regiment 
Regt. Regent 
Reg. Prof. Regius Professor, 

King's Professor 



Rel. Religion, R^t!^ 
Rev. Revelation, Reverentf 
Rt..Wpful, Ri^rht WowhipfoJ 
Rt Honble. Right HonouraWcj 
oaclop. Shromhir& 
S. South; and Solidus, aShiUing 
fwr. Sir 

^. Saint 

$ept. or 7ber, September' 

Serj. Serjeant 

Servt. Servant 

Sd. Solution 

S. T. P. Sacro SaactB The^. 

logiae Professor, Ptofesscr 

of Divinity 
Tho. Thomas 
Theo. Theophilufi 
Thess. Thr Jonians 
y. Vide, Sse, Veree^ Kvo 
iViz. videlicet, that is to s«^^ 
Will, or Wm. William 
Wilts. Wiltshire 
Wp. Wor^ip 
Wpful. Worshipful 
Xu Christ 
ye. the* 
then 
them 



ya. 
ym 
yr. 

yu 



your 

this 

you or thou 
&. et and 
&c. et caetera, and so firtliM 



^^i ~.lw*' '^^^'-'^'^''^^ o".l?*»« to ^ avoided m much » powible, an- 
lew It bfe tor oiw iown private ute, and where it Would be ridiciloiM 
to write them at length ; a*, Mr. for Master, and Mr,, for M^uTZ 

tnl^^i^^^T^ duregpect and slighting to u«e CiUmctUn, t©'?^ 
better^ and 13 oftea puaysliug to oUiers. 



'9 JlJ^eto SDuine 

TO 

THE ENGLISH TONGUE 



r 



PART IV. 



SENTENCES in PEPSE. 

DESyiE to excel others in virtue is very commenda- 
ble ; and a dc*%ht m obtaining praige UesenEo* encourai^enient' 
because it discovers an excellent mind ; but he is wickedwho 
employs his thoughts only to out-going the wi^rst in villainy, 
®ttch a contention is diabolical. 

^ 2. A wise man values pleasure at a very little rate, because 
It IS the bane of the mind, andvtbe cause of all misery ; but' he 
values no possession more than virtue, because it is the foun- 
tain of all public and private happiness. 

3. Boast not of thy health and strength too much • only 
whilst thou enjoyest Uiera, give praise to him that bestoweth 
all good things upon all men : use them well, lest he deprive 
thee of them, God doth give to thee, return him net evil, 

4. By. the fall of Adam from that glorious and happy states, 
wherem he was created, the divine image on his mind is quite 
changed and altered ; and he who was created but a little in- 
ferior to the angels above, is now made but little superior to 
tJie angels below. 

5. Children are such as their institution ; infancy is led al* 
togetiier by imitation ; it hath neither words nor actions but 
what are infused by others : if it have good or ill lancruage it 
is borrowed ; and tlie shame or tliatAs are 4>nly due^'to th'eia 

.tiiat lent them*. 

6. Covetousness brings nothing home. Sometimes men are 
•o blinded with avarice, that they contradict themselves and 
lose what h honestly due to them, by coveting what is not 
justly their own, and thereby give others an opportunity of 
deceiving them. , 

7. Do not the work of Godnegligectly ; and let not your 
heart be upon the world, when your hand is lifted up in 
prayer : for that time, you may be confident, is gained, which 
is prudently and zealously spent in God's servi<.e, 

8. Divine providence disposes all things most wisely ; not 
OHiy ill WsiJit coTiccras trie noria m general, but every one of 
us in particular : so that in what condition soever he puts U5 
we may assure ourselves that it is b«st for us, «nce ke vhoos^ 
it, who cannot «rt. 

M 



134 



A NEW GClDfe 



H 



9. Ever since the transgresBion of our first parentg, thepua 
rity of human nature hath been miserably stained ; its faculties 
have been sadly depraved y and iti affections very liable to be 
deluded, influenced, and overcome by the world* 

10. Enquire not into the secrets of God, but be content to 
learn your duty according to the quality of your person ©rem* 
ployment. God's commandments were proclaimed to all 
the world ; but hi« counsels are to himself, and his isecrot 
ones, M'hen they are aduiitted witjiin the veil. 

11. Flatter not yourself ihat you have faith tosBrards God, if 
you want charity towards your neighbour ; for the one is ft 
certain pTect of the other. Neither follow a multitude to 
flln, lest God make you share with them in their pimishments, 

12. Gold, though the noblest of metals, loseth its lustre 
when continually worn in the same purse with copper, or 
brass ; and the best men, by associating? themielves with the 
wicked, are often corrupted with their sins, and partake if 
their punishments. 

13. Gregory Nyssen compared an usurer to a man giving 
water to one in a burning fever ; which does him more harm 
than good ; so the usurer, though he seems for the present tfi 
relieve his brother's wants, yet afterwards he rrierously iw- 
ments him. 

14. Happy is he who allows himself time and leisure to 
maka his peace with God, and sign a truce with heaven ; but 
more to be admired is he, who is obliged to Jive in the midst 
of temptations, and yet can be in love with religion to the last 
moment of his lift. 

15. He that only pleases himself, does himself no kindnesi, 
because he displeases God his creator ; who commands us to 
be kind and good to all men, and to do unto others those 
things which we are willing should be done to ourselves. 

. 16. If they go down to the pit, that do not feed the hungry, 
and clothe the naked ; what will become of those that take away 
bread from the hungry, and clothes from the naked ? If want of 
charity be term nted in hell, what will become of the covetous? 

17. It is a commendable thing for a boy to apply his mind 
to the study of good letters : they wiU be always useful to 
him ; tliey will procure him the favour and love of good men, 
which thos.3, that are wise, value more than riches or pleasure, 

18. King Darius' mother, when she heard of the 'death of 
AletcandeTf I 'id violent hands upon herself; not that she pre* 
ferred an enemy before a son, but because she had experienced j 
the duty of a son in him, whom she had feared as an enemy. L 

19; Let us never measure our godUncss by the number oil 



T& THE ENGLISir TONGUE. 



135 



Sermons, which we hear, but by the fruit we brine forth • 
Without Which all our hie^ring will serve but to bring us into 
tliat portion of stripes, which belongs to him that knows his 
master s totll and does it not, 

20. Lazy folks take the most pains. Some people art go 
carelesa, that they will rim all haziirds, rather than help them- 
selves at t\\2 expense of a little trouble; and it generally hap- 
pens, that they afe tha greatest sufferers in the conclusion. 

n. Men are generally governed more by appearances thart 
rtaities; and the impudent man, in his air and behavior, 
undertakes for himself that he has ability and merit, while the 
modest or diffident gives himself up as one who is possessed 
01 neithor. 

22. Many gfter> ahe gtown so negligent of seekine divJno 
mercy betimes, that they put that off to the last, which shouid 
ftave been the first pari of their business ; and many times their 
«tc 18 at an end, before tncy begin ther repentance. 

23. No man is so prosperous and happy, but he has somj^ 
Untortunata and sad tUiys ; and on the contrary, no num is so 
miserable, but he has sometimes of refreshment. Prosperity 
ind adversity by turns succeed one anotlier, as raia does fair 
Weather, and fair weather rain. 

'2^. Notliing is more^absurd than to extend our hopes ar^d 
desires, ^^?? pt%fb?fK^ancrde^ns^S^1?r^^ 
term of our hving here : and it is unreasonable for us to troubl7 
ourselves about this worW, longer than we are 1 kely to conti» 

25. Obedience comprehendeth the whole duty of a man both 
owards (xad, h,s neighbour, andliimself; we should therefore 
let it be engraven on our hearts, that we may be useful iu the 
common wealth, and loyal to our prince. 

^.^i!\^f^'' ' '' '"'^' ^^-"'arkable sin ; and often meets with 
ytry ^...tiaorainnry juctoments even in this life ; but will cer. 
t:im< V J;. punished in the next ; for if God spared not the an- 
V^J'l^:^^ '^'""^ them into hell, let! no man hop^^ 






, Personal merit is all a man can call his own. Vv 'lof^v^r 
s ri.t^y adherts to honesty and truth; ard lead, a rer„}ar and 
virtuous lue, is more truly noble than a debnurh^d I:^aJ!^ 
proii^at.^ wereho clescended tn,m the most \Wu,'.io;,,^. 
.-b. HiCit.s :re like dun^-, which stUik in a \v,^r> ; but bf-iivr- 
prcad abroad, make the earth fruitful, it is but^no^e ft^^ cf 

them. The best metals lose thoiriustrc, unless brightene d by ust^ 



lil 



i'C 



136 



A'NEV^-'GtJfDE 



jifl 


!■''' 


i^^B 


W^m ^ 


t -|^^B 


H^ 


jj§jj§ 


^^■^ 


Jj^B 


^B| 


*3H 





i 


■ 


j - 


1 


i: 

It! 

» - 


1 



heac Tf ft r'"f "■■ ""^ '^?"'* of tJ,e pardon thereof, whiih is 

W £r. '.. f T."'' """^ **?«" •«■•'>'>" without it. * 
JO. b«rvants should not deal worse with their masters for 
deahng better with them, but conscionably do their w^rthat 
the proverb nmy not be verified in then. : HetJimmhk 
servants' ua<res befhrehan^ r,,H r.«- h: ' i, ^i' ■ 
occasions hir„-to'Shffi an1^4. "^ "'^ ' ''"' ''' 
31 . The lawfulIncGS of our actions may not be iudeed bv the 
events, but by the grounds ; the wi.e and holy Ser o7 Sc 

Tuc ls"'!:;'^^'-"^'7 '!"^^^' .^^^ better cauihath the wor.e 
the agent ^ "" ^"'' "''""'' ^' "'""^^^ ^■^^' ^ V^^^^i to 

aU m'aili^d^in^f'' "^'•^'^ * "''''/^^' *^^* '^ ^'« ^^''^^^"S to entertain 
'^^^J^'^^*^]^''^^^^<^^-''inL\h^s such variety of em ploY- 

support at least, if not enrich themsdves. "^ 

prect'^ d^t hP ' ^' ^omn^hM t.> our management ; so 
mom rTc' .^ ^v''*^ \^ ''' ^>^ ^-'^P^ ' "«^ ever afibrds us two 

heathen philosopher, viz. Make it no longer a matter of dispute, 
what are Lie mark:; aiid signs of a righteous ^.an, but imniecU- 
ately set about it, and endeavour to become such an one. 

3i). Virtue (said a vicious man on his death-bed) as much 
out^imes vice in splendour and light, as the glorious luminary 
ot heaven, which runs its duiiv course in the lofty sky, does 
that small rushlight which stands glimmering by my bed-side. 

26, Upbraid no man's weakness to discomfort him, nor re- 
port it to him to disparage liim ; neither delight to remember 
It to lessen him, ©r set U'yself ab^ve him, A nd be surt never 
to praise thyself, or to dfspraise any man el.'ie, unless God's 
glory, or some good end do allow it. ) 

37. Wicked breasts are fal&e to themselves; neither trusting 
to their own choice, nor making choice of that, which they 
dare to trust. They will set a good face upon their secret 
..1. !ta..,.-5 °'"^ » »"•»* iiau.iia«v;r tie owir-conaemaea, than wise 
and prudent. 

3«. Young minds, being fullest of ignorance, want instruct 
tion most ; are fittest to receive it, as being freest from preju-, 
dices, and woridiy cares ; and are apt to retain it best. beirJ 
yo;a of such corruptions as vwauld otherwise expel it 



arrn ; that is, 



rff to entertain 



10 THE ENGLISH TONGUE. 13^ 

CHAP. II.— SENTENCES IN VERSE.. 

A Life is fJiori and misernbk. 

H ! few and full of sorrows are the days 
^f miserable man. His life decays 
Like that frail il -wV, which with tin; sun's Upfise, 
Her bud uufoidS, and with the eveniojc* (jjgs ; "^ ' 

He, like an empty shadow, glidei» '^iway, 
And all his life is but' a wintgr'''j j^y. 

On the diligent jifit:. 
Ants in Ivwttaha to \hii'ix cells conve'^^ 

But w.a,„„. J,, devor^i til ::^-, .. 

ror m y jt^ir mouths we ^pp tSn«, ^' ? » 

A stocl. for winter.^vhirthev In''*'''^ ^^^"^^'' 

. I tftiiLh they know must cohie;^ 

T^olA- .u On the Atheist, 

-" 1^^%^' ^''} attempt to scan 

l^sotHnn, tluit's infiniteiv wise, 
^e he cannot comprehend denies • 

on 1^ too weak a guide to show, * 
Aiuiig.ity governs all below. 

^future State certain, 

Jl.ador« tJiW,eve, whene'er ,va di^ ' 
• that canacfJse to heaven fly ^' 



<x»m On cM:t 



All wear)% resurrection* li?/Pf" ^^ receive*? 



And died adeath jt^a?, that will rely'^ 



Conceited thoughts, ''^^mpture. "^ ^. 

Exclude all future knowK 3(i^^ ^W'd> '^^^ 
For he that thinks- himself S^*«sp»r'd, ' 

In course all further knowle^iM?*?'** yfont!KS^h€^ 
And but for this, how mAfiy ral^ ttBClefltttest. 
J^t> reputable, wise, aud lKm€»t%. 



ru 



it 



«? 



^^^ A' NEW GUIDE 

On Death 
Death at a distance we but glighty fear, 
He brings his terrors as he draws more n4r . 
Through poverty, pain, siav'ry, wc drudge on, ' 

No dZ' ^^^5'^^^' ^^"^' P^'««^ *^ none" ' 
TheTelV..^ ^^"^ '^. ^"'".^^^ ^^^^-^ *"d breath, 
ine heaviest burden's easier borne than death. 

Dazzled with hope, we cannot see tfie cheat 
Of aiming with impatience to be er^t 
When wi?d ambition iu the hean we^d, 

In/ ""f/^i^^d^ we leave the solid shor^' 
And wonted happiness returns p. m^ '^' 

^ager the soldier meets his desp'rate foe* 
With an mtent to give his fatal blow : ^ 
The cause he fights for animates him hW h » ' 
, Namely, religion, and dear liberty. 7 
For^these he conquers, or more braWg <Jiesv 
And yields, himself a willing sacrifice. ^ ^ 
_j, ^'^ ^A^ Resurrection, 

From ev'ry corner of th'extended eaitf^" 
The scatter d dust is.called to second b^th, 
1 he sever d body now unites «gain, 
And kindled atoms rally iato men. it 

AnH !5'*'"^^'?^' resume. their a»cient^at8; 
And evry lunb its former tasfe Rer*«t» ^ 
„ ■ ' 'On Youth, '/astEegloh 

Fragrant the rose is, but f.^^® ^" ^^^ ^S;." 
The violet sweet, but quic'^""^"^^''"ig ^>y *' * 
White lilies hang their heJ^ ^^ discomfoi-'™^ J 
And whiter snow in mip^^ Jneither deli- «ecay j 
Such and so withrin*"^' abpve him, J^Y '*■' 
Which time or sir^^P^"'^^ any man.^y^* 
.aid do ailow it. . «*8troys. 

First to -^^^^ ^^^ ^"^^^^ ^o therf^* 
The sr~**^'c^» "yr makiijg r^*^ tevVence boTr^ 
Nex . '^^^y ^'^^ set a p^f^nce we owe ; 

•tident. «-rti kindred we direct : 

..; Young minds, bey(^ who gr«wn beneath the weight 
n most ; are fittest tT*" want,' commisserate.. 
-iccs, and worldly cp^ On Mortality., 
5'o;d of such corrui^y palaces we must remove, 
^£4odging5 of a grav* to j^rov.ej 



TO THE ENGLISH TONGUE. 

tewc the fair train, iuj4 the \igU gildod j-^m. 
To lie alone, benighted in the tomb. 
God only ig imtnortal ; man not so : 
Life, to< be-poid upon demand, we owe.. 
07h honest Labour, 
Go to the ploughj or team ; go hedge or ^tch ?: 
Some honest calling t^se, no* matter which ; 
Be porter,, postman, |»Jj? the kb'ring oar ; 
Employment keeps the bailiff* from the door* 
Though thou be mean, thy frugid. industry. 
Depend upon it, shall rewarded be.. 

Heaven ig our guard, andimjoceJWMits c^rej. 
Nor need the just the worst of dangers fear :• 
It pities the detencelpss poor man's grief; 
And sends him, when ke coils, help and relief.;- 
Its arm, the surest succour, and the be»t». 
Delivers andtevenge* the distress- d^ 
On an active Life,. 

Happy is he, the only li^ppy man^ 
Who out of ch«ice, does all the good he can > 
Who business love% and others better make^, 
By prudent industry, and pams he takes : 
God's blessing here he'll havei and man's esteeiii^> 
And, when-hediesj hi&.works will follow him.. 
Mis^rtunes advantageous.' 

In all misfortunes, thisadv^ptage lies, 
They make us humble, and they make us wise >: 
Let s bear it calmly,, though a grievous woe, 
And still ador<j the hand that gives the- blow <; 
And he that can. acquire such virtue, gains 
,4ft ample recompense for all hispains.. 
On CHRIST our Life.. 
_ I am the resurrection, saith the Lord ; 
Eternal hfe's the fruit of my eternal, word ;. 
Whoever firmly does m me believe,. 
The grave shall not. confine, nor hell reqeive : 
isior only this • but those, that will relv 
Wii wiiat I teach, shaij never, n#ver dlj.. 
On the Scripture. 

Let sacred writings always be admir'd,. 
Whose holy penmen truly were ifispir'd, 
Through aU succeeding times, both wor.?t 8»4 besf, 
They hav8.rM».4awij, m^kom.Hie rtfiae«kte»t. 



mo^ 



A K£W GUIIW! 



A* jsi>Irit there In €\'ry line we see, 
t)i iiope, Jove, joy, and immortality, 
On the Fall of Man, 
Man was by heaven made ta govern all ; 
Hut how unfitj demonstrates in hia fall : 
Created pure, and with a strength endu'd 
©t grace drvine, sufficient to have stood : 
But alienate from God, he soon became 
The child of wrath, pride, misery, and shamfc.. 
On the Hcertie^ 
No providence the Sceptc wiU allow , 
Then let the ungrateful mortal tell me, how 
His tender infancy protection found, 
And how his childhood Mas with safety erown'd' 
How through his youth he came to manly years ' 
, Through many dangers>whiclv lie sees and fears4 
I'/te Good oJ^Evil, 
One week's extremity may teach us moFc 
Than long jwosperity had done before ; 
Death is forgotten in our^easy state. 
But troubles mind us of our tiftal fate p 
The doing ill affects us not with fears, 
But suff'rmg ill brings sorrow, woe, and tears,:. 
On Lying, 
On all octasions ta declare the truth ' 

Is most prai«e-worthy in a virtuous youth. 
A faqltiextesuated by a lye,. 
Is doubled in reality thereby J- ^ 

And he that to this vice becomes a slave. 
In fire aiid briniBtone shatt bis portion have*'. 
* On Foretk^ughtt. 
Rashness and^iaste make all things unsecure • 
All great concernments niustdelays endure • * 
i hink on the means^ the manner, and the enA 
Wfifen^any greatdesign thoa dost intend ; ; 
And if uncertain thy pretensions be^ . 
Stay^ still fit time wears-out uncertaimy.. 
. (^ft Me Parliament. 

See rsriinins 1(^in/v imA... u;« rL_i ^r. 

Mriymg to make each subject's heart his owfc 
^y j'jstice ruhng, but with mercy raixti . 
Supporti«g worship, as^by law 'tis fixt ; 
While lords and commons all as one aare^ 
Tq aetti© firm hit crown f^A dignitj^. 



TO THE ISSGUSU TONGUE. 

On Trouble, 

„J^®,^^PF«s^ "^" ^^^^ ^^«r breath'd on earth. 

With all the glories of estate and birth, 

Had yet some anxious rare to make him know 

No grandeur was above the reach of woe : 

To be from all things that disquiet, free ' ^ 

Is not consistent with humanity. 

On the Almightj/ Potter. 

The lofty concave of the vast expanse, 
Could never be th'effect of giddy chance ; 
Those beauteous and amazing globes of light,. 
No power could make, that was not infinite ; 
But when He spake, each atom of tliis frame 
Iiroin the dark womb of empty nothing came. 

-, . ^^i^^ f^^i in Devotion. 

Whither thou goest conceive, and to what end! 
When thme own feet the house of God ascends 
There rather hear his life directing rules, 
Than offer up the sacrifice of fools, 
For sinful are their gifts, who neither know 
What they to God should give, oi what they ow^. 

OnDeaiL -'^- 

Whfen we have once resign'd our sinful breath, 
[Vox we can die but once) then, after death, ' 
Th' immortal soul immediatcJy goes 
To endless joys, or everlasting woes. 
Wise then's the man, wh© lafiiurs to s*cur^ 
His passage safe, and his reception sure. 
CHRIST on the Cross. 

Ye wand'ring travellers, that pass this way;,. 
Stand still, awhile these agonies survey } 
And on result of serious thoughts declare, 
If ever sorrows raight with mine compare. 
But God, in mercy, hath decreed this cup. 
Most willingly, tlierefore, I drink it up. ' ^ 
Live to Die. 

You, whose fond wishes do to heaven aspire, 
\Vho make those blest abodes your sole desire \ 
If you are wise, and hope that bliss to gain, 
Use well your time, live not an hour in vain : 
Let not the moi row your vain thoughts employ,. 
But thinjc tl;is day the last you shaff enjoy.. 



I4|r 



imr 



KiEW OUJJJ& 



SELECT FABLES; 




■Efc tluit will not help himscl/i Mu^hdn 

Jrom nobody. ^ 

FABLE L 
^ Oftk. IVAGGONER and HKRCVLP.S. ' 

a hole, ajid stuoi fl^st. '' "^*'"* n^s-waggon sunk into.' 

The poor mm i.n.n!-diHt<^}" f 'i ..^> u- , 
to H.reule,, that he m^ d 'i 1,"''?" ''"' ''"'^'^^' »"-! praye* 
again. "^ S<-t hi» itnggon out- of the hole 

t-^^s'i^ r^a:':t^^^ and set thy 

M^rcules, he vviJi help '^!ee ^^^^"^ ^^^»^ wiit call upofi. 

TRE mTERPRETATTnxr 

»lore hW a»»i3teace, but make u.e of h- k"" "'" ""'-^ '"- 

. uui. mdKt use of his own best endeavours. 



to TIfE ifKOtlfitt TONOUK. 




i^ 



> 



Se mirnyul of past favours. 



FABLE 11 
^Mf HOUND DESPISED hi, hU MASTEH. 

N aged houad being in pursuit of his game, caught it btk 
^•uld not hold It, because hfs teeth were worn out; for which 
ma maater corrected him very Eevcrely. 

tKoT^lf ^"^ ^F^^ ^t^ ^^ ""{^^^ ^«^ ^^ punished, alleging, 
ihat he wa. old ; yet, he said, he had been stout in his yout£ 

^re only for h.s former .ervices; but I Bee,%oHtinu4 hu, 
MthiDg pleasea witKewt profit. ^ «^ 

THE INTERPRETATION. 

K a m^inff is Hot continued, it is forgotten. Many people 
are 8o imgrateful as to take no notice of the ninety-mne «wd 
torn* which they hftve ^received, if the bondredtb be dcki^ 



t4* 



A NEW GUIDE 



¥.■■ 



h 




Young folks think old folks to be fools ; but old 
folks know young folks to befools. 

FABLE III. 
Of the KID, the GOAT, and the WOLF. 

W H l^^N the goat was going abroad, she charged the kiti 
to shut the door after her, and open to none, tili she should 
return ; and then to look out of the window first. 

Very well, mother, says the kid : if you had not told me, 
I should have had wit enough to keep the door shut, and to 
fake care of myself. 

At the sanne time the wolf happened to be behind the house, 
and heard the charge given to the kid. 

Some time after the goat's departure, the wolf knocks at the 
dbor» and counterfeiting the goat's voice, demands entrance. 

The kid, supposing it to be her dam, forgt»t to look out at 
the windovy, but immediately opened the door, and let in tue 
wolf, who instantly made a prey of her and tore her to pieces. 

THE INTERPRETATION. 

Children should obey their parents, who are always better 
»«ie to j^dvise theru than the chiidren can themselves. It is 
convenient also for young men to lend an ear to the aged, 
who being more experienced in the affairs of the world, can 
give them better counsel, whereby they may avoid many 
tfaugcrs. Witness iVi's sons, and Eehobocun'a falh 



TO THE ENOLISH TONOCE. 



t4« 




A man maj/ forgive an mjur„, but he eannot 

easily Jorget it. 

FABLE IV, 

Oflh, HUSBANDMAN and the SNAKE. 



THE INTFJJPnT>.TATrA>i 



s ■» i_j i-ia^»'\,-i:;3- 



in 
to 



It ill not 

friendsh ^ 




once made abreadi 



but 
guard. 



no iuirni 



^ NEW cvmE 







Make no friends/up mith an ill-natured man. 

' i^ABLE V, 
Of the WOL VMS and the SHEEP. 

1 HE wolves made n league with the sheep, and hogtoffe* 
were g^vea on both sideg. The wolves gave tSeir younir^es 
to ihe Bho p, rmd the sheep gave their dogs to the wolves. 

feome t, me «fter, while the sheep were quietly feeding io the 
meadow, the young wolves began to howl for tljeirdama : at 

Thpln J^.h IT ''^T i"'^^^ *" *^™°"e them, and charged 
tftem with breaking the league. 

The sheep began to excuse themselves, saying, they ireit! 
feeding by themselves, and therefore could nothuit q/youni 
wolves, rot having any dogs with them. ''^^ i S 

Butthevvolves insisted on it, that they were ffuiltv oft 
breach of friendship ; alleging at the same time, thai those ia- 
nocents who never did any harm in their lives, would not make 
..^pii dreadful lamentations, unless some violence had been 
ottered to them ; and Jaaowing the sheep to be without Uidr 
gaura, they tell iipon them, atMLtore them to pieces. 

THE INTERPRETATION. 
Be always upon your guard when an euetii¥, js near. He 
.who has always run counter to the rulee ti' JfrienlMip, wifl 
never become a tru* friAnrl ^krMi»u .,».. -i,.„ij ».• . jT-., i .: 

4he strongest engagements. ;ia Jien^, «.«"«-*5' 



I 



fOfUt fikGllSH TO^JGtrUi 



id^ 



m^i^^'P 



ed man* 



9 



Mid hostages 
ir young cues 
he wolves, 
feeding id ibe 
eir danu ; at 
and charged 

g, they irere 
lit ^\Q young 

guilty oft 
that those ia- 
uld not make 
:;e had been 
without tliiir 
sees. 

is near. He 
ndelbip, win 



I 




A 



HSoneaii^ is the best Folictf. 

PABLjE VI. 
Oft?ie nVQ THIEVES and (he BUTCHER, 



COUPLE of sharpers went to a'bittcber's sbc^ to buy 
iome meat ; but while the butcher was busied with other cus- 
tomers, one of them stole a piece oi beef, and gave it to bis 
ISellow, who put it under his cloak. 

The butcher presently missed the meat, and charged them 
with the theft. 

But he that stole it, swore by Jove, that he had none of it.; 
and he that had it, swore likewise, he did not take it away. 

To whom the butcher replied, the thief to me is unknown^ 
though I believe it to be one of you ; biit ht by whom you 
have both sworn, can tell, and will reward } ou accordingly^ 

THE INTERPRETATION. 
God Almighty is privy to all our actions ; and though Ve 

iTinv fnr nwilt» Ae>cn\vi> irjpn. vpf ivp rantint PSPaD6 hls a41-ssof>inff 

ejfe, who will reward or punish us according as we deserve^ 



I4d 



A NEW GUIDE 




^ Uar is not to be helievp^} n,^.. 7 r 
^^ , FABLE Vir. 

would oftciuimcs in r-t „! nf/^u*'"^'^? "> " "'oadow, I,e 

his a«,.,an,co, nvKl thc-n Ik. would V'''"''^'^" '^""^ "»» «o 

«ud> f .o!.s as to co„,e wh'n ly-m ,'?«■' "' L''^--'' *or being 

A t last t'le vo\Uirr,f. i,, „ "' '*''"" them. *= 

«ut a, u„.a, . but lltr^:^:^-;:^;.-;; tho ,,oy began to cry 

■ »»J;-'!udeth.„« agii,,, n v-r "rouW^*^ ' '"^ ""■'>' "■""ted 
I'm le: Iiiin CO oil- and -io tl,I ^ ^■""""'■'"^''''-'s al>out liin. 
the .voir, andVcre'destloJcd. "'' ^'''"'' ^'' "^"^^r P'4"« 

^^ THE INTERPRETATION 

"otoiious for ivini^ . tl „ „ """ot escape theni; others aro a. 

f-con.panyr2dattri:?S%:?'"<^\^- "^^^^^ 
lor>vhen once the deceiver Till^f '?.<="«'? tl.'ng they say: 

" '«'■ evrr deridted in every company.'"* ^''""' "* '*""• ""'''« 



W fV» Kl^ClvISH fONGUB. 



r^. 



w 




Let envy abne, and it will punish itself. 

FABLE VIII. 
OftheDOGandtheOX. 



■^1 



/X N ill-natured doig laid himself dowrn in a manger full of hay, 
Piesently came an ox to feed ; but the dog in a surJy man- 
ner bid him begone. * 

Well, replied tlie ox, thou wilt neithe. eat the hay thyself, 
nor suffcjr others to eat it ; therefore stay tiisre in this thy en- 
vious hu.nour, and keep away every ox, and then thy envy will 
become thy punisliment. 

The dog did so, and by that means starved iiiniself. 



THE INTERPRETATION. 

Envy torments hoth the body and the mind, and Is deserved- 
ly its own punisher. Tims we .see, some men are content to 
lose a blessing themselves, that others may not enjov it. 



150 



•«'. 



A NEW GUIDE 




Cne good turn deserves another. 



FABLE IX. 



A 



Of the naVE «nd the BfS. 



rorJSfrj **« •'"'"^ "^ ^ fe^'tai'* t„ drink , but peing, 

lif^stX"df'Sf«'ar„W2r^** beesen.gg,i„g ft. 

«d by be. weight brouStto die ifT^ ?k" ^"^ *°>"''«'°. 
«et upon ; and so saved her life ** ''**^'' '^* *^« ''^ might 

^ that infant wr^troi "f^t^rt',*^ "- -"- 

jtenger, stung the fowler s^ToJerer^fh^f, ^''^""'"" '" '"'-^ 

Jet the net go agion, b, whietS tbtSove Z^'^ '» 

TH£ INTERPRETATION. 



J^A±t':^j}y^''"^f><i ' and always return *»l. .„ u. 

— .->-'-ws. TV i.iii;iij, - ^ — -f-w-ttj 



ujveu 



^ THE EN'CtlSn TONGUE. 



m 



'gling for 
fotintain, 
»ee might 

've; and 
«e (who- 
in such 
>liged to 
d.. 




y^ U: 



Etilbe to them that evil think. Also, Throw i 
crust to a surlij dog, and lie mil bite you. 

FABLE X. 
Of the GOOD-NATVREB MAN and the ADDER;, 

A GOOD.NATURED man Being obhged toeoout m^ro«tv 
jreather, m h,s retmn home found L adder L lost foz^S. 
death, wh»ch he brought with him, and la^d before the fire 

As soon as the creature had received fresh hfe by the warmth 
^n^ was cojue to herself, she began to hiss, and VXout ufj: 
ho.^e ; and at length killed one of the children" ^ ^ 

v^ell, says, the man, if this i* ^e best return thafvou can 
make for my kmd offices, you shall e'en share in the same fate 
if ourself ; and so killed her immediately. 

THE interpretation:. 

Ingratitude is one of the blackest crimes that a man can he 
gmlty of : It is hateful both to God and man. Jd?lT± 
unngsuiion sucfi a graceless wretch all tliat mischief whreh hi 
cither did, or thought to do to another. 



l5^ 






4 NEW CVlDt 




Lazyjolks take the most pains. Also, Give a mm 
his bread and cheese when he has earned it. 



J'ABtE XL 



A 



Of the OLD WOMAN mid her MAWg, 



„ CERTAIN old woman havine about her a nm-z^^r /^f rJt. 
n.a.ds.^wou!d oblige U.e» .o ,ise fver /rorniil/n^et'ot 

m.f f c,"*^ f"^f? '""^'"^f "".*'''' •*'» '•ardship, resolved to 
put a stoj. to this growing evil, and so cut off the cockS hp»H 
th,nku>g that they might then Ue a^bed ^eci^ely, .„d fnXtj 
themselves m their laziness. •'^* »na inauige 

But the careful mistress soon frustfafed their dpsJan. n«^ 
ordered a bell to be brought to her, with whfcrshe?^^^^^ 
rung them up at midnight. ^'^ 

THE INTERPRETATION. 

^^ w good to be industrious ; for fazinrss i* ^«*«««.l 
punished w.fh wanti and drowsiness Tai h Sj .^ortmonfy 
a mun with r^^^.. "^^wsmess, saith ^/om«n, >;'ill cover 




TO THE EKGLMH TdNSUB. 



«5^|§^ 




we a Tnrfn 
ed it^ 



tS0 




A bird in the hand is worth two in the hush^ 



rcefof idfe 
t the cock 

esolved to 
ck's head ; 
id indulge 

signs, and 
ever after 



'Oteimon^y 
^'ill cover 



FABLE XII. 

&/the FISHERMAN and ihe FISH. 

Xl FISHERMAN httving cast h\» line into the water, pre-- 
sently after drew up a fish. 

The little captive entreated the fisherman that he woulc^ 
spare her (she being but small ) till she was grown larger ; and> 
then she would suffer, herself to be taken by him again. 

No, no, replies the fisherman, 1 am not to be so served : If 
I let you go, I must never expect to see^ou any more ; neither 
s.iould I have caught you now, if you had known there was * 
hook wjthm the hair ; and I was alM'ays of that temper, thafe* 
whatever I could catch, I had lather take it away tlian leav«- 
it behind me^ 

IHE INTERPRETATION, 
Never let go a certainty for an uncertainty. 



/ 



TO 

THE ENGLISH TONGUJ& 

PART v7 
PUBLIC PRAYEk^ 

TOR 
THE USE OF SCH60tt. 



Jntkg Morning,. 

AtMGHTY 6M, the ftuntain of attidfiSfcto weKumKfc 
»e»oecb thee to pour into o..r he^^rtTi^r^llZl^M 

the true holy catholic church. Mor. «pec lll^wi nl ^""'^ J" 
«Me^*»»^rf<,», (He j,o^r a,uttl^ ^Ur^f j„ Zt' a.T'Z 



««^M,/./W.^ „^M. Hal, Ghost, t^^Uh u:luevern.or.. 



and the love of God, 



In the Eveninrr. 

}:' ^'■^'"IGHTy God, and most mercifi.l F,,^. __ . 

^-V "xe. to torgive ali the error, and tranTgr-e^Jiois^hieh'S 



o 



10t« nro !>•- *-1 



TO THE ENGLISH TOUQVtk 



15$ 



hast beheld in us the day past ; and help us to express our 
«iifeigned sorrow for wLt has been amiss, by oii^re^ 
.nmenB ,t. What we know not, do thou teach us : instruct u, 
m our duty, both towards thee and towards men ; ar.l Xe « 
Ijrace always to do those things which are goad and welJ-nleJ! 
ing IB thy Sight. Whatsoever good instruction^ have beil^; 
given this day, grant that they may be carefully remembertd 
uiid daily followed ; and whatsoever good desires^thou hast^ut 
nito our hearts, grant that by the assistance of thy grace, they 
niay be brought to good effect ; that thy name m?y haie thj 

thZT{ T *^°J?f^^^« "^^y ^»»^« comfort at the day of account, 
through Jesus Christ our Saviour ; in whose holy name an3 
word! lye further pray unto thee, saying, Qur Father, S(c. 

PRIVATE PRAYERS, 

A Prayer for ff^isdom and Knowledge. 

To be »aid by a Child going into School, or at any other Time. 

%J ALMIGHTY Lord and merciful Father, Maier of He<w 
ren and earth, who of thv free liberality givest wisdom abun- 
rtantly to alt, who with faith and fqll assurance ask it of thee, 
beautify by the light of thy heavenly grace, the towardness of 
my wit ; the which, with all the powers of nature, thou hast 
poured mto me, that I may not only understand those things, 
which nmy effectually bring me to the knowledge of thee, and 
the Lord Jesus our Saviour; but also with my whole heart and 
will, cpnst^tly follow the same, and receive daily increase 
through thy bountiful goodness towards me, as well in good 
We a» doctrine: so that thou who workest all things in all crea- 
rures, mavest make thy gracious benefits shine in me, to the 
epdless glory and honour of thine iinmortal majesty. Ametu 



O 



A Morning Prayer for a Child. 



LORD our heavenly Father, almighty and everlasting God, 
who hast safely brought me to the beginning of this day, de- 
fend me in the same with thy mighty power. Direct me in all 
ray laudable and praiseworthy undertakings for the best, and 
J)le88 me m them. Enlighten \m understanding, strengthen my 
jjiemory, sanctify my heart, b,xA guide me in my life: Let the 
^utiesofthis d^ybe cheerfully undergone by nie : and give 
^e |rac^sa tp a^piy isyseif io my learning, that i may thereby 



i5& 



4 NEW GUIDE, &C, 



^hecome a useful member of the conmionwealth. Graat that 
J may be obedient to my parents, and to those who have the 
.<Hire of my education ; to behave myself soberly, and with 
^ood niunnera to every one ; and that I may lead an innoccMt 
und in')ffengive life. Lord, protect and deiend all my relations 
and friends ; and grant that none of us may fall into sin, nei- 
ther iuii into any kind of dang'.r ; but that all our doincs may 
be ordered by thy governance, <o do always that which is 
righteous in thy sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord, to 
whom with thee and the Holy Ghost, be all honeur and glory, 
world without end. Jmeju 



O 



An Evening Prayer for a OiitcL 



_, LORD God Almighty, by whose Providence I have been 
preserved this day from all dangers tliat might have befallen 
jne, I humbly beseech thee to contuiue thy watchful provi- 
.dence over me this night. Let mv guardian angels defend nte 
from all tlie perils and dangers of it ; andjfrora all assaults of 
my spiritual enemies. And do thou, who art always more 
ready to hear than I am to pray, and art wont to give more 
than either 1 desire or deserve, pour down upon me the abun- 
dance of thy mercy ; forgiving me those things whereof my 
X^tfnscience is afriiid, and giving nae those good tliijigs which I 
am not worthy to ask : ^ft in my heart the love of thy name ; 
increase me in true re-igion ; nourish me with all goodness, and 
4>f thy great mercy keep me in the same. And grant, O Lord, 
that I may so faithfully serve thee in this life, that I fail not 
Anally to attain thy heavenly pronu'ses, which exceed all that 
J can desire, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 



S 



Grace before Meat, 



_ A NOTIFY, we beseech thee, O Lord, tliese creatures to 
our use, and ourselves to thy service ; through Jestis Christ 
<?ur Lord. Amen, 



G. 



Grace after Meat, 



^ OD'S holy name be blessed and praised for this present re^ 
rreshment ; and for all his mercies from time to time bestowed 
upon U9 ; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 



m-i- \. 



Grant that 
ho huve the 
^, and with 
an innoccMt 
my relation* 
ito sin, nei- 
cloincs may 
at which is 
IT Lord, to 
ir and glory, 



I have been 
ive befallen 
:htiil provi- 
s defend nte 
1 assaults of 
Iways more 
give more 
le the abun- 
i\'Jiereof my 
ags which I 
f thy name ; 
lodness, and 
nt, O Lord, 
at I fail not 
eed all thai 
len. 



i) 



creatures to 
estis Christ 



3 present r£^ 
»e bestowed